Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway

Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway
by Saaru Lindestokke                

Submit your Photo
Hall of Fame

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

New answers tagged

0

Here are points to consider when making choice: 1x crop sensor + teleconverter is almost never better (have not seen counter-examples yet) than 1,5x crop sensor with same resolution and technological level + same objective without teleconverter. Teleconverter is extra glass and extra glass always means some light loss, some contrast loss and some ...


0

I own Nikons and Leicas so am not a Canon shooter but I switched to a full frame Nikon (D3s) several years ago and have been very pleased although I have bought 3 FX Nikkors to take full advantage of the camera's capabilities. I have also bought a F610 as a backup - Based on my experience I would go for the full frame Canon body and build from there. *


6

The main fundamental thing to get used to is doing the crop math in the other direction with FX lenses. What you're used to seeing as 50mm with your crop body, on full frame, will look like 35mm on your crop would. Having all your glass get wider is the first disconcerting thing you think you're prepared for, that you really really aren't. Particularly when ...


3

Really you are making two transitions here. From a D3200 you need to accustomed to a pro body with dual control-dials, more direct controls and a 100% coverage viewfinder. This would happen if you are to move to a D500 or D7200 instead too, even though these are APS-C cameras. While you can probably ignore the extra buttons ;) it is best to get accustomed ...


0

It is possible to go both ways but you would have access to a wider angle-of-view by going full-frame using a rectilinear lens. On full-frame, the widest lens currently is the EF 11-24mm F/4L USM which has a 126° maximum angle-of-view. For APS-C, the widest rectilinear lens is a Sigma 8-16mm F/4.5-5.6 which gives an angle of 114° (Actually, I think it less ...


0

Six of one, half a dozen of the other in terms of FoV. Not so much in terms of expense and the character and size/weight of the individual lenses. Just me, but if you want your 24-105 to be the wide-angle walkaround it was designed to be, then get a full-frame body to mount it on. When I added a 5DMkII to the arsenal, my usage of the 24-105 changed ...


0

Actually, the reason lies in the manufacturing process. Pages 11-12 of an old Canon whitepaper detailing their full-frame sensor technology describes the economics of manufacturing image sensors of different sizes. Image sensors are semiconductor devices, like the CPU in a computer or the SoC in a smartphone or tablet, and are manufactured in batches by the ...


0

There are two other advantages that full frame will give you besides better low light performance. A full frame image is 50 to 60% wider depending on the crop factor on your camera platform. On Nikon, it is 50% wider. This is crucial for landscape photography and makes it a far more compelling case for me. The other important factor is that full frame ...



Top 50 recent answers are included