Napioa - Wind Origins

Napioa - Wind Origins
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5

The main fundamental thing to get used to is doing the crop math in the other direction with FX lenses. What you're used to seeing as 50mm with your crop body, on full frame, will look like 35mm on your crop would. Having all your glass get wider is the first disconcerting thing you think you're prepared for, that you really really aren't. Particularly when ...


3

Really you are making two transitions here. From a D3200 you need to accustomed to a pro body with dual control-dials, more direct controls and a 100% coverage viewfinder. This would happen if you are to move to a D500 or D7200 instead too, even though these are APS-C cameras. While you can probably ignore the extra buttons ;) it is best to get accustomed ...


0

It is possible to go both ways but you would have access to a wider angle-of-view by going full-frame using a rectilinear lens. On full-frame, the widest lens currently is the EF 11-24mm F/4L USM which has a 126° maximum angle-of-view. For APS-C, the widest rectilinear lens is a Sigma 8-16mm F/4.5-5.6 which gives an angle of 114° (Actually, I think it less ...


0

Six of one, half a dozen of the other in terms of FoV. Not so much in terms of expense and the character and size/weight of the individual lenses. Just me, but if you want your 24-105 to be the wide-angle walkaround it was designed to be, then get a full-frame body to mount it on. When I added a 5DMkII to the arsenal, my usage of the 24-105 changed ...


0

Actually, the reason lies in the manufacturing process. Pages 11-12 of an old Canon whitepaper detailing their full-frame sensor technology describes the economics of manufacturing image sensors of different sizes. Image sensors are semiconductor devices, like the CPU in a computer or the SoC in a smartphone or tablet, and are manufactured in batches by the ...


-1

For a long time I shot with both a Canon 5D Mark II and a Canon 7D. The only time I used the 7D was for sports at longer focal lengths, for the extra reach with other subject matter in bright light, and when I was using both bodies at the same time (wide lenses on the FF 5DII), long lens on the 7D. When actually shooting the 7D felt like a far superior ...


0

There are two other advantages that full frame will give you besides better low light performance. A full frame image is 50 to 60% wider depending on the crop factor on your camera platform. On Nikon, it is 50% wider. This is crucial for landscape photography and makes it a far more compelling case for me. The other important factor is that full frame ...


0

Low light capability is very useful when shooting newborns. Larger sensor size will allow better subject isolation (shallower depth of field if using the right lens and focal length)for certain types of portraits. Another advantage of a FF camera is that you can more easily use wide angle lenses in the range of 24 - 35mm. These are pretty useful when ...


0

Don't be concerned with shutter lag. Any DSLR has almost instant shutter reaction. You are talking about milliseconds here. The 7D is better for sports and action, and the 6D is better for low light and overall image quality. Only you can decide which is more important for you. Keep in mind that going full frame means the lenses you have now may not fit ...


5

Focal length is never adjusted for crop factor, since it's a physical property of the lens. It doesn't change just because you put a bigger sensor behind the lens. So, a 10mm lens on your Nikon 1 would still have a 10mm focal length on full frame. What would change, if a 10mm Nikon CX lens worked like a Nikon FX 10mm lens, would be the field of view. ...


5

10mm is 10mm. Focal lengths of almost all interchangeable lens camera systems are expressed in the actual focal length of the lens.There are certain technical reasons why this is so, but the simplest is that a lens' focal length is defined as the distance from the film plane needed when the lens is focused at infinity to cast point light sources as a single ...


2

We all see things differently. People who complain online are likely to outweigh the people who write to tell you how happy they are. In that case, just be aware that complaints are far more frequent and can distort the real picture significantly. 'Walk around' is a term that suggests you want a lens that you would prefer to keep attached to your camera ...


4

None of these lenses are going to approach L series lenses in terms of build quality and the ability to take punishment and just keep working as they should. There are reasons they offer near the same optical quality at 1/5 to 1/15 the price of an "L" prime lens. I've had an EF 50mm f/1.8 II "nifty fifty" since 1997 or so and it still works fine for what it ...


2

If you are considering a Canon 50mm lens, you should really consider the new EF 50mm 1.8 STM as it is much much better than the old plastic mount EF 50mm 1.8 II. The new STM version has much more accurate STM AF along with a metal mount, closer min focus distance, 7 blade aperture, better focus ring, and new coatings which improve the optics. It is so ...


2

You seem to have some confusion about the different lens designations. The "nifty 50" is the EF 50mm f/1.8. I don't think Canon offers a 50mm f/2.8. generally build quality is very important to me so the 50mm f2.8 "nifty 50" is out. Then step up to the EF 50mm f/1.4 USM. At $350, it costs more than the f/1.8 that I think you're referring to above but ...


2

Well the 40mm is a better focal length for walk around in my opinion, however if you are into portrait then the 50mm is certainly more flattering and it's a tad bit sharper and faster.



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