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92

One major difference is that a FF camera produces a depth of field that's around 1.3 stops shallower than an APS-C camera for the same subject & framing. This is most important when you have the aperture as wide as possible, e.g. for portraiture. To replicate the look of a 50 f/1.4 lens you'd have to use something like a 31 f/0.9 lens, which doesn't as ...


45

No, it is not a bad thing. It is not really "good" or "bad" in any sense. Its simply a different format than full-frame, which is different than medium format, etc. There are pros and cons to each. The smaller APS-C style "cropped" sensors do have some effects on lens focal length due to their field of view, and that can be beneficial or detrimental, ...


45

The price you pay for using FX lenses on DX is bigger and heavier lenses and less appropriate focal lengths. The core question you should be asking is: Why do you want to upgrade to full frame? Image quality in DX is superb and getting better. FX bodies have better low-light ability, but DX will be just as good; it just lags a few years. The higher ...


30

EF-S lenses are specifically designed for APS-C digital bodies and optimized for the fact that they have smaller sensor and mirror. EF-S lenses are marked with a white dot on the mount instead of red one that EF-glass has, and can be only used on EF-S compatible bodies (almost all of smaller-sensor Canon DSLRs, up to EOS 7D). Film and larger-sensor digital ...


28

Remember that full frame is not explicitly better than APS-C, it's just 'different'. It's perceived as better because shallow depth of field is very trendy, and that's the advantage of full frame, and for the portrait work I do it's invaluable, and even more important is the fact that I can shoot a scene at f2.8 and have it sharp, if I shoot the same scene ...


25

There is a disadvantage due to the sensor size, everyone will say that. While true, it is actually quite minimal. Obviously, it varies between models but a recent m4/3 camera compares to a recent one with an APS-C within one stop in terms of noise, and it is rarely visible until ISO 800+. Here is how the differences looked last year. All these models had one ...


23

The first technical difference is the fact that the sensor is smaller than the most common DSLR sensor sizes (APS-C and larger), whilst it's going to be less optimal than an APS-C, full frame or medium format (very expensive) sensor, it's still going to be far better than compact sensors. Noise will be comparable to APS-C (1.6x), though probably not quite as ...


22

The "S" in EF-S stands for "short back focus", which means that the rear element of the lens is closer to the image sensor than on regular 35 mm SLR cameras. The proximity of the rear element to the image sensor greatly enhances the possibilities for wide angle and very wide angle lenses, enabling them to be made smaller, lighter ...


15

One aspect of this comparison that has not been mentioned is the fact that crop-sensor cameras are generally faster for a given price point. The 7D shoots at up to 8 Frames/Sec, the 5D manages 3.9 Frames/Sec The 1Ds III manages 5 Frames/Sec, while the 1D III/IV manages 10 Frames/Sec In sports photography, where continuous drive is often used, those extra ...


13

Any EF fit lenses you own (usually marked with a red dot near the EOS mount) will work fine with the 5D mkII Any EF-S fit lenses you own (usually marked with a white dot near the EOS mount) won't work or fit the 5d mkII, as these are designed to fit crop sensor cameras like the T2i and not full frame sensors like the 5D mkII As an addition, some non-canon ...


13

Let me tell you a story. In the beginning there were the D30 and D60, which were 3 and 6 megapixels respectively. Simple. But then they moved the D to the end and released the 1D, 10D and 300D (would have made sense to call that last one the 100D, but whatever). The number of digits now meant the market the camera was aimed at, 1 digit was a professional ...


12

Which macro lens you get would probably depend on what kind of macro photography you want to do. There are a variety of macro subjects: flora, insects, still-life objects, abstract closeups. If you wish to photograph insects, and are a beginner, a longer focal length that gives you more working room in front of the lens would probably be better. I am a ...


12

Let's say I have a micro-4/3rd camera and a full frame camera, both set to 1/60 at f/2.8, taking a picture of the same scene in the same lighting. Will the exposure be the same across both cameras despite the different sensor sizes? Yes - if it's the same lens or both lenses have the same transmission, and assuming that by saying "same exposure" you're ...


12

Just a clarification: the size of a Micro 4:3 sensor is the same as a normal 4:3 sensor (what changes is the distance from the focusing elements to the sensor plane). Of course the 4:3 itself is a little bit smaller than an APS-C, but not much. So do not expect worse sensor performance than in any Olympus or Panasonic DSLR. ...


12

When comparing film to digital cameras, you need to compare apples to apples. I searched for the EOS 1, EOS 1Ds and EOS 1DsMk3 and found a surprising fact: the EOS 1, when equipped with the battery and motor drive extender (grip) which brings it to about the same physical size as the EOS 1Ds/1DsMk3, becomes almost the same weight and even heavier! EOS 1: ...


11

Two very good answers already, but I want to chime in that isn't necessarily related to Crop vs FF, but rather your ultimate decision: 7D vs 5D Mark II. While the 7D and 5D2 have different sensors, they are also geared toward different usages. The 5D2 is not really designed with shooting action. It works (I use it), but the 7D is better with a higher ...


11

The zoom helps with crop sensors but that's not the main reason. Basically on a full frame sensor the 8-15 is two lenses in one, at 8mm it's a full fisheye with a circular image and a 180 degree vertical field of view. At 15mm it's a diagonal  fisheye, with 180 degrees corner to corner and no black areas. Even if you don't want to shoot circular ...


11

Based on the specs the 6D has a smaller lighter body better AF system WIFI and GPS built it slightly better screen and more recent UI SD card slot instead of CF (users may have a preference, or a collection of cards already) The 5D mkII has magic lantern firmware option lower price CF card slot is available now plus a host of lesser differences, ...


10

Canon has a pretty diverse line of DSLR products, and it can be difficult sometimes to figure out what everything means, and why one particular product is so popular. I've added a comment that contains a link to THE nomenclature decoding thread here at Photo.SE, and that should answer any questions you have about codes in lens and camera names. As for your ...


10

These are the different sensor sizes: Full frame sensor (Nikon's FX, Canon does not use special term): 36 x 24mm, no crop (actual size might differ slightly between brands and cameras) Canon's APS-H: 27.9 x 18.6mm, crop factor 1.3 Canon's APS-C: 22.3 x 14.9mm, crop factor 1.6 Nikon's DX: 23.6 x 15.8mm, crop factor 1.5 (23.1 x 15.4mm, crop factor 1.55 for ...


10

Nobody mentioned the fact that micro four thirds cameras are very good for experimenting with old manual lenses. The micro 4/3 system is mirrorless, and has a very short falange distance (distance from sensor to lens), that allows it to use most lenses on the market, with an adapter (and there are lots of types of adapters). the slow focusing speed is not ...


10

In terms of field of view, or framing, APS-C is defined as a ratio to full frame. For Canon it's 1.6, for Nikon/Pentax/Sony it's 1.5. So, when looking at this: X x 1.5 = Y X is the focal length on the APS-C and Y is the focal length on the FF. So, we sub in and rearrange for: X = 50 / 1.5 X = 33.3333 So, you'll get around the same field of view if the ...


10

B&H sell a Nikon F6 35mm film camera for $2,449.00, it weighs 975g B&H sell a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR for $2,699.95, it weighs 995g


10

The original link is actually my article and lens. I shaved the petals off the lens because I didn't want them to show up in the full frame camera images. Although I already have the 16mm fisheye, the 10mm shaved is a totally different look and although you don't get a full circle, it's better than spending more money for a new lens. I wasn't concerned ...


10

All else being equal, yes. A bigger sensor requires more power. Advancement in power-saving technologies can sometimes improve that but with higher pixel counts being the norm, we do not see much of that. Each pixel requires circuitry so higher megapixels require more power than making the sensor bigger. Luckily bigger cameras have room for bigger ...


10

EV is a measure of illuminance, which is defined in the link you provided as "luminous flux incident on a surface, per unit area". You are correct in stating that when if you keep field of view, depth of field and subject brightness constant: Ev_crop = Ev_ff x c² however since: Area_crop = Area_ff / c² and Light(total) = EV x Area we arrive at ...


10

The size of the sensor does not matter, it is the size of the pixel. Having that said, bigger sensors like in full frame cameras tend to have bigger pixels. You can estimate the size of the pixel by taking the size of the sensor and divide it by the number of pixels. This calculation is not accurate because most sensors have gaps between the pixels and ...


10

Essentially, your argument is correct as long as you understand that negligible and high-price are relative terms. You are correct that you get one or at most two stops advantage between a full-frame and an APS-C sensor of the same generation. More importantly so, the advantage is lower at low ISO sensitivities with modern cameras which are essentially ...


9

The main stylistic reasons revolve around the ability to capture wide-angle shots (although less of an issue with wider EF-S specific lenses) and that a larger physical sensor allows for a narrower depth of field (for a given aperture/focal length) In additions, on a technical level, a larger sensor also allows for lower pixel densities, which can improve ...



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