Westminster fountain at sunset

by Jorge Córdoba

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22

There are MANY links below...hover over each one to identify where they start and end, and view each example. ;) For nature: Position your camera behind a lone tree or under a forest canopy, and let the filtered sunlight (or moonlight) create rays of light in the fog. Capture trees fading into the fog. Find a lake shore or some islands out on the water, ...


11

I shot a (relatively popular) series of photos in the fog last year at night, feel free to check the EXIF info or the pics for inspiration. Essentially I was using my fastest lens, a 50mm f/1.4, hand held (this flash fog didn't last long, no time for a tripod). I relied on a lot of silhouetting, and city lights (naturally diffused by the fog). The light ...


9

Awesome question, I am studying for my Private Pilot license and (as a photographer) found the chapter on Weather Theory facinating. Among other things, it gives a very reasonable description on the predictors for fog (and other meteorological events). It describes 4 kinds of fog and when each may/will occur: Radiation Fog: "On clear nights, with ...


8

You can wait till it gets dark, and street lamp create shafts of light, and use those to your advantage. You can also backlight someone (for example with car headlamps) and him look like he's stepping out of a flying saucer.


8

I can't see any obvious noise in the photo at this resolution. I can see some JPEG artifacts (sections where the subtle differences in shade look like blocks rather than a gradual transition). Some people get confused between "noise" and "artifacting", and refer to both as "noise". Actual noise exists in almost all digital photos to some extent. Cameras ...


6

The effect is known as Rayleigh scattering. Blue light has a wavelength of around 400 nano meters, which is more likely than red light (650nm) to be absorbed by particles in the sky and radiated toward the ground, leaving the red light to carry on and hit our retinas. The water vapour in fog, however, are much too large to scatter individual wavelengths and ...


6

I am fairly certain what people are telling you is "noise" are actually JPEG compression artifacts. Unlike RAW images, JPEG images use a form of lossy compression...that means that some degree of detail and perfection in an image is permanently lost when saving a JPEG image. From what I can tell, the photo you posted is not noisy at all, however it does ...


6

You're looking for very humid conditions followed by a (somewhat) rapid cooling, relative to temperature. In practice, Spring and Autumn tend to feature the sorts of temperature swings needed, but fog can obviously occur any time of the year. The humidity needed to form fog will most likely come from recent rainfall, but again, this can vary. A fast ...


5

I check the weather forecast. Of course many people are interested in this information so weather centers predict it. It is especially critical for pilots. Try http://www.intellicast.com/National/Humidity/FOGcast.aspx or similar. They also define it on that very website as "Fog forms when the difference between the air temperature and dewpoint is 5°F ...


4

Dust in the atmosphere is the main cause of colorful sunrises and sunsets. According to wikipedia sunsets tend to be more colorful due to the presence of more dust in the atmosphere at the end of the day compared to dawn. Dust scatters (Rayleigh scattering) the small wavelengths of light (blues and greens), leaving the reds and oranges to come through. But ...


3

From my experience it's actually very hard to affect film by making it go through airport X ray machines. Unless you are using extremely sensible emulsions you should not notice anything at all (Even in those cases I have heard about people not noticing a thing in 3200 rated film that went through an X ray machine). Plus, if it was an X-ray issue the marks ...


3

Is it noisy? What would a noiseless photograph of fog look like anyway? On my 27" iMac this image looks like a foggy scene. Unless the judgement based on a larger, higher resolution image which displays noise, e.g. coloured pixels, I would disregard the opinion.


3

There will be no or almost no shadows, so textures will mostly disappear, you will have to work exclusively with colors and/or shades of gray. You can use the fog to your advantage since it will very strongly separate objects that are close to the camera from the background. As other have suggested, if you can get some light source, there is a lot you can ...


3

Morning mist tends to form after a rainy day followed by a clear night, and you can also get mist on a hot sunny day following a cold night. You are more likely to see mist around bodies of still water or in river valleys, and can also find it near wet, marshy ground such as fenland.


3

Is this a theatre piece that you are shooting for publicity or documentation? If so, I'd talk to the lighting director and director/choreographer and explain the problem and see if you can arrange a dress rehearsal with more light. You can then either underexpose and/or post-process so the resulting images match the intended lighting effect.


2

You could use a number of different things to produce effects similar to fog. A number of pyrotechnics are available to produce large amounts of smoke. (Legality may vary depending on where you live) In addition, if you are trying to save money, there are many home-brew versions of fog machines available for you to simply make yourself. Depending on the ...


2

There are some sets of conditions that are just extremely difficult to shoot in. Low light with moving scenery and people is such a set. My normal advice would be to bring your own light (e.g. an off camera flash) but with a stage full of fog that probably isn't going to work. In any case you are going to get some softness just from shooting through the fog. ...


2

You could try increasing the white point in the highlights of the image. That should keep the darker parts dark while making the white brighter. The same thing could also be accomplished using curves and pulling up the brighter side while keeping the darker side linear. If you shot raw, you might also try increasing the exposure and then increasing the ...


2

I don't recommend using a white balance tool in this case. That would result in altering the gray fog to the correct color, but it will also bring out the blue in the sky, which you don't want. So I'm going to suggest using a levels tool. Many applications have this and it's really easy to use once you know how. In this example I used Pixlr, which is ...


1

Well, if you do not see it on the films directly... It is not X-ray :-) You might have some dirt in the film scanner. Also, if it was X-ray, you would see it periodically on the film, with possibly a bit decreasing intensity towards the end of the film. And finally, try to view the film in a sharp angle. Is there something on it that reflects the light a ...


1

Even if you are not shooting in RAW, you can still use PS Camera Raw to edit the files. Simply go to File -> Open as... and choose camera raw format, then open your jpegs. ACR should give you plenty of options to deal with the fog :) As Bart pointed out correctly, this does not answer the question on how to make the fog whiter, just points towards a ...


1

If you live in a town that has a film industry, check the local lighting rental companies. Some of them have a device that can produce a lot of smoke for outdoors. There is the gas powered variant, but then there is also the fuel powered variant which is more fun. It looks like a weapon from MIB. It's also really loud, but very effective. A cheaper ...



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