Sunset in Kruger

by MrFrench

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0

Things that's catch you out, from recent experience and echoing some of the above. As all the photographic setting's side has been pretty much covered... This is primarily assuming your going to be shooting somewhere quite cold and a remote dark location. Take a second camera! Beg, Borrow, Hire a second camera, if anything like me you travel thousands of ...


0

After some googling I found a windows program called CombineZP on this minimalistic website. The Zip archive contains sources which means you might be able to port this to other OSses. My results were not very good but I must admit that I totally didn't know what am I doing: One of 20 similar samples


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As martinerk0 said, you could have less noise by increasing the exposure time of the live view at the cost of a low frame rate. But to do that, you have to hack the software. What you can do instead of hacking the software (and what you are probably already doing), is take a picture with no noise, see the result, correct... and so on, by trial and error. ...


0

Your LCD only outputs data from camera sensor. It could be possible to tweak software so sensor would capture more exposed scene, but at the cost of low framerate ( because exposure would have to be longer ) . If there is not much light, camera software can only incease ISO, which is artificially increasing sensitivity of sensor, hence producing noise, while ...


3

If you set the AF-C and the AF-S priority to Release, this will enable you to take photos irrespective of focus/color/contrast. These settings are accessed by Menu/Custom Settings/Autofocus/a1 AF-C priority and Menu/Custom Settings/Autofocus/a2 AF-S priority. They should both be set to Release. It is all on page 231 of the D7100 User Manual (p.259 of the ...


1

The current standard kit lens with the SL1 appears to be the STM version which means, among other things, that the camera has to be powered on and ready to shoot (not sleeping) for manual focus to respond. Essentially it's a "focus-by-wire" system, where there isn't a direct physical connection between the focus ring and the actual lens elements, instead ...


2

The question of Rowland Shaw is a pertinent one. The battery level indeed seems to have an impact on the size of an individual focussing step. At least, that was my observation when I was trying to automate landscape focus stacking with Magic Lantern. As my first objective was to simply count the number of steps of a full throw (i.e. from close to infinity), ...


3

The only difference in terms of sharpness I see is that the first shot appears to be at f/2.8 and slightly front-focused, while the second appears to be shot at f/1.8 and either slightly front focused if you are aiming for the branch in the left central area or grossly back focused if you were aiming for the nearer branch. When viewed at the same display ...


1

Prime lenses are generally sharper due to the reduced diffraction by not having the extra lens elements required for zoom lenses. A prime lens, even a cheap one, is a master of one focal length, that's all it needs to do and generally, it does it as well as the glass permits. Whereas, a zoom has to get it right over a much larger focal range, in other ...


1

The 24-70 is an f/2.8 lens. You are shooting at f/2.8. The lens is fine. Read up on what Depth Of Field is and you will understand why your pictures appear blurry. They are not, you are just using a small Depth Of Field.


0

I've been in the same situation as you and have solved it using two ways: Remote Live View and Magic Lantern. Unfortunately the Magic Lantern firmware is not available (yet) for the 1200D, so I'll explain the first method only. If something is unclear please ask for clarification in the comments, search Photo.SE or ask a new question. Remote Live View This ...


1

You can increase your f-stop. That way, the depth of field of the photo increases and more of the scene will be in focus. This darkens your image, though. Also, if you'd like some blur in the background, you'll have to keep the f-number low. Additionally you can try to manually focus. That way, the camera won't mess up (you will). As Daniel mentioned, you ...


5

The way I did it back when I had no remote to trigger: Place some dummy object to focus on, start the timer, then run and replace the dummy with yourself. I'm sure you've got something lying around that you can use for that purpose. Even if it's just a broom leaning against a chair. That of course is just a workaround to get things done. If you're doing ...


1

As a bird photographer (I was founder of the bird photography group on G+) I have to say that photographing birds is hard. The areas around birds tend to be clutters (leaves, branches, etc) and this can confuse the autofocus. Light is normally marginal so you need the large apertures, which narrows depth of field, so any auto focus mistake kills the image. ...


0

Back in the days when the Earth was cooling and I was in high school we never had these problems. Focusing on wildlife in the trees was very simple - look at it, turn the ring until the creature was in focus, press the button. So if the autofocus system can't make up it's mind just flip the switch on the side of the lens and do it the old-fashioned way. ...


3

When you use a larger sensored camera, you're going to be working with a thinner depth of field either due to using a longer lens, or from being closer to the subject to get the same framing. The reason the Fuji and Nikon bridge cameras don't have as much trouble focusing is that with a smaller 1/2.3"-format sensor and a superzoom lens that has 500mm or so ...


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I approach this problem by thinking of what can lead to blurry images, then eliminating those factors. Given your parameters, you will be sometimes shooting in low light with a long lens. That means opening up the aperture (reducing depth of field) or reducing shutter speed (increasing the chance of camera shake or subject movement), both of which can make ...



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