Spring 2012

Spring 2012
by ani

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1

WEll, I wrote this originally, and you do not re-focus, after you have pressed the af-on back button to lock focus, you turn away,hold your shutter button down, then turn back to you prefocused spot and your camera will automatically make the exposure. (I learned how to do this on a Yashica af230 film camera and posted it on several forums, and tried it out ...


0

I'm not sure that tethering is going to help, unless you are specifically manually focusing and just can't quite nail it. You can also try a better orientation of your subject to be more in line with the camera's sensor plane. Also, it looks like your camera has the ability to perform focus micro-adjustment for a given lens. You can try this by printing out ...


8

It looks like a Chinon 40-150mm f/3.5 zoom, correct? In either case, those are focus marks for infrared photography. Infrared light will focus at a different point than visible light, so if you want to make infrared pictures you'll use one of the red markers instead of the white mark for the focus scale. There are multiple red marks because the IR focus ...


3

Those markings are for focusing infrared. Infrared light focuses at a different point to visible light. It will also vary with zoom length. To focus at infrared on that lens you would select the mark witch matches the zoom you are using. Then you would match this mark with the correct distance from the focus ring above.


4

There are some other considerations, depending on the camera in question. I'll address it from the point of view of Canon EOS cameras (which is where the nomenclature AI Servo originated). Situations in which One Shot will perform better than AI Servo for Canon EOS DSLRs: Low light conditions. Per Chuck Westfall, the head of Canon USA's Professional Client ...


8

Yes it is convenient, and does track a subject, but not always your subject. For this reason, I always use one-shot. In situations where there are multiple potential subjects, but one I wish to focus on, one-shot is really the only way that works for me. In sports, but even in travel photography: In sports, you are shooting a soccer game, and you wish to ...


0

The subject in your photo is moving and is NOT in focus ? but the exposure seems to be correct for his location. You could switch to manual focus mode, choose how the camera sets exposure or where in the scene you want to point the camera for setting the exposure, recompose and manually focus on the subject. The dynamic range of light is to wide for the ...


0

In the manual for the X-T10 or X-Pro2 (and probably others), when describing the AF+MF feature, Fujifilm suggests: Set the focus ring to the center of the focus distance indicator, as the camera may fail to focus if the ring is set to infinity or the minimum focus distance. This seems entirely reasonable. Of course you can't then get to extremes far ...


0

For smaller objects and larger magnifications manual focus is recomended using live magnification, it is funny that many times it is better to use zoom ring or moving camera backward-forward than turn the focus ring. For flowers and leaves autofocus on chosen point would give good results. If you want better result and not want to use stacking, then tilt-and-...


11

Yes, it's possible With the focus stack you could estimate a depth map of the scene. Then this map is used to selectively blur the image to emulate the effect of shallower depth of field. See for example: https://graphics.stanford.edu/papers/focalstack/ You could of course use other methods to generate the depth map, such as moving the camera (as the ...


6

what focusing mode should I use Any AF mode that works for you is fine, but many people prefer to set the camera to manual focus mode and make fine adjustments to focus by moving the camera. You can mount the camera to a macro focus rail and mount that on a tripod to make it easy to make and maintain small front/back and side to side adjustments. ...


1

If opening the aperture all the way (possibly using a very low ISO and/or an ND filter) still doesn't get you low enough depth of field, the chances are you need a faster lens (one with a wider aperture). Pushing or pulling the focus and stacking is unlikely to help more than a tiny bit as the sharpness falls off fastest close to the focus. Fake bokeh ...


3

Yes, although it is actually a bit different than what you described; it is most typically referred to as the Brenizer Method. See this question for much more info: What is "bokeh panorama" (also called the "Brenizer method")?


1

The description is quite accurate. It simply means that the camera will focus the lens at infinity each time it is powered on. Many modern lenses can focus beyond infinity and have no stops at infinity, so when shooting very distant subjects such as stars it is difficult to focus, particularly since light is very low. While I almost always turn off that ...


0

To get "most of it in focus" you need to use the hyperfocal distance, not infinity focus. When the lens is focused at infinity you give up any depth of field past the point of focus and push the near limit of DoF further back than it will be at the hyperfocal distance. I think the point of resetting the camera to infinity focus each time it is turned on is ...



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