glasses

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New answers tagged

1

The description is quite accurate. It simply means that the camera will focus the lens at infinity each time it is powered on. Many modern lenses can focus beyond infinity and have no stops at infinity, so when shooting very distant subjects such as stars it is difficult to focus, particularly since light is very low. While I almost always turn off that ...


0

To get "most of it in focus" you need to use the hyperfocal distance, not infinity focus. When the lens is focused at infinity you give up any depth of field past the point of focus and push the near limit of DoF further back than it will be at the hyperfocal distance. I think the point of resetting the camera to infinity focus each time it is turned on is ...


2

Make sure the lens is clean Zoom in, touch and hold to lock the focus, verify if the focus is correct, then zoom out and you are ready to record


1

It would be nice if you control a bit more your light. Use a brighter lamp (and always use the same one) This will make your Iphone to close a bit the diaphragm, and then focus a bit more. If you take one video at day and other by night the surrounding light affects too, so try to keep it uniform and bright. The second thing that could be is that on ...


1

If I understand your example correctly, the focal plane changes with color. I think what you show here is axial (longitudinal) chromatic aberration. APO lenses are not necessarily a solution here. Canon does not mark any lenses as such and as far as I know none of their macro lenses are perfectly corrected for axial CA. The lens you have is pretty good. ...


3

The camera lens is a converging lens. Light rays from the subject enters the lens and the lens, due to the shape and density of the glass lens, emerge tracing out a revised path. This path resembles a cone of light. We focus the camera by moving the lens forward or backward. This action adjusts the position of the apex of the cone. We want the apex to just ...


11

You are seeing chromatic aberration — a prismatic effect which, as you nicely illustrate, reduces sharpness even in black and white photography. A lens which has greater correction for this is called an apochromatic lens — often something like "APO" in the lens name. Note that in lenses for telescopes and microscopes, you'll often also see achromatic ...


1

I don't think these are salvageable in post to be honest. At least not at a level I'd be comfortable charging a decent enough price to make it worth the timeSeveral folks have talked about the main issue these show... the noise. I have a couple other ideas that I don't think are helping any at all. Consider them more food for thought for next time. First ...


0

In my opinion, the lens is good enough. The fuzzynes is the smallest problem. 1) The noise. If you are using the built in flash, you really do not need to push the iso to 1250. 200-400 is ok. 2) The built in flash. I supose you want the prints because you want the photos to last, and be apreciated... That lighting is the worst light you can get. Sure, you ...


4

Hopefully, you shot RAW! But even if you didn't, you can still try to fix some of these things in Lightroom. To my subjective eye (and subjective monitor...), the white jerseys are slightly over exposed, so it draws the eye away from the person's face. Also the first player's face seems slightly over exposed. To me it gives a sense of fuzziness. Another ...


1

Due to the excessive amount of noise, I think you have two options. 1) Try using a denoise tool (such as Topaz DeNoise, there are others as well). This may give you acceptable results, if not... 2) Reshoot with better lighting. (BTW - you don't need to shoot at 1/200s for a portrait, there is very little motion, so slow down your shutter and lower your ...


8

I do not think your photos are fuzzy,I think they are noisy. You will get the best quality image by shooting as close to the 'native' ISO as possible. For most modern dSLRS that is typically ISO 100 or 200. By shooting at ISO 1250, you will naturally get noise. Reshooting is the only thing that will significantly reduce the noise. With Lightroom, assuming ...


1

Couple questions that might help narrowing it down: Can you rule out the lens (mounted on this camera) as a source of the problem? Do you have any good pictures shot with it at the same aperture and focal length? What was your setting in LR for noise reduction? Isn't the NR overdone? What is the LR settings for sharpening? Can you crank up the sharpening ...


1

The ratio of the amount of Depth of Field (DoF) in front of the focus distance to the amount of DoF behind the point of focus is highly variable. At Minimum Focus Distance (MFD) most lenses give a DoF that very closely approaches 1:1 or 50/50. At any focus distance past the hyperfocal distance the DoF ratio is 1:∞. The common 1:2 or 33/67 rule of thumb is ...


0

I think this may help though I'm not sure what mode you currently have set... make sure that the AF-Area setting is on "Single Point" (pg45 of the user manual). I believe using any of the other AF-Area modes may mess up the feature. The manual seems to indicate that the functionality you desire should work. I have a D7000, and it does not have the issue ...


0

As the question you've linked to says, this is a limitation of the camera. A workaround would be to flip the lens into manual focus after you get what you want with the focus-and-recompose method. That's an annoying extra step, but at least it will work.



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