Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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83

Most importantly: It's not just the disks rendered from a point source, even though that's the simplest way to describe it and see it. The disk is just a shorthand; the lens characteristics that produce these disks are always present; they're what determines the look of the out-of-focus areas in every photo you take! On the one hand, it's quite ...


47

In the daylight focus on a very, very far away object, like a radio tower. Mark your focusing ring with a bit of tape or something, and you have your infinity setting. For closer focusing in the dark carry a laser pointer. Tape it to the camera or tripod so it points at your subject. The red dot should be easily seen through the viewfinder, and it will ...


36

Increase your ISO as far as you can go without losing too much quality (to get a shutter speed as close as possible to the 1/focal length rule). Practice and use a stable shooting position like one of these to help steady the camera: http://blog.muddyboots.org/2009/04/avoiding-blur-due-to-camera-shake.html Slowly and smoothly press the shutter button, don't ...


34

I think the best way to describe Bokeh is to show Bokeh: Reference: In the Spotlight by Healzo The blurry background "circles" are what we normally refer to as Bokeh, however in general it more simply refers to the quality of background blur. The picture above has some truly excellent bokeh, as the circles are truly round, generally evenly shaded across ...


28

The hyperfocal distance is the distance at which everything from 1/2 the distance to infinity is in focus. For instance, if the hyperfocal distance of a particular lens at a particular aperture is 100ft, then by focusing at 100 ft you can capture anything from 50ft-infinity in clear focus. A more in depth explanation can be found at www.dofmaster.com


26

With some lenses (mostly fast wide-angles) there's a possible problem from focusing and then re-composing: as you re-compose, what you originally focused on will no longer be on the plane of focus. With longer lenses, this is rarely much of a problem, if you're shooting with something like a 30/1.4 on full frame, your subject could be quite a ways out of ...


24

Bokeh, in its most technical definition, is the shape produced by taking an out of focus picture of a single point of light. The overlapping bokeh from all the myriad points of light that make up a scene creates the blur in out-of-focus areas. People may have different preferences, but there are really just a few different measurable qualities of bokeh. ...


23

I've never attempted to photograph the Aurora Borealis myself however the following advice applies to most celestial photography: You will want the fastest (biggest aperture) lens you can get your hands on. The 50 f/1.4 is ideal, though the focal length is quite long for this sort of thing. It's good because it will let in about 5-6 times as much light as ...


23

I wear glasses, and I'm a good photographer (so I'm told). Do you have trouble looking through the viewfinder? No. You get use to it after a while. Do you prefer contacts over glasses? I have no preference when taking pictures, however my preference in general is using my contacts. Do you find it harder to manually focus? Not because of ...


23

What you are looking for is large depth of field. This is an optical property, not something applied as a special effect, so it's not something you can turn on or off. The raw image capture the light focused by the lens, and inevitably there will be parts of the scene out of the range where the rays are tightly organized by the lens. In fact, the fashion of ...


22

Many suggested answers so far assume that you can see something through the viewfinder or the focal point is close enough to use a focusing aid. While all great suggestions for low light focusing, I think you're dealing with no light focusing. I spend a lot of time photographing similar situations where there is just no light in the viewfinder at all. ...


22

Short answer: Current autofocus systems only work when the AF area contains high contrast. The places where it doesn't work don't contain enough, and the areas which do work, do. Here's what's going on in more detail: There are two different types of autofocus systems in modern cameras. One is the contrast-detection AF, which is used in most point and ...


21

In general there are the following advantages of manual focussing via the optical viewfinder instead of the LCD: The viewfinder image is almost certainly sharper than the LCD, when viewing the entire image. This makes it easier to judge when something is in focus for the times when you need to be able to see the whole image at once (e.g. for a scene that ...


20

The twisting motions you apply to focus and zoom rings are converted to forward and backward movement by helical threads and tracks cut into the barrels inside the lens. This photo shows an example of the threads that do the focusing duties in a partially-disassembled Nikkor prime: Note the tracks cut into the inner barrel and the metal rails in the outer ...


19

The most obvious reason is to be sure that you can reach the spot where it focuses at infinity. It would be hard to make the lens stop at exactly infinity, and any little change (temperature, humidity, filters, et.c.) might move that point slightly, making it impossible to focus exactly at infinity. On a prime lens you would need only a small margin, so ...


19

There is a fairly simple explanation here: http://www.paragon-press.com/lens/lenchart.htm To summarize from that site: Simply put, the focal length of a lens is the distance from the lens to the sensor, when focused on a subject at infinity. To focus on something closer than infinity, the lens is moved farther away from the sensor. Focal ...


19

Focal length is a measure of the lens's ability to bend light. As such this figure doesn't change when you use a smaller sensor. What actually happens when you use a smaller sensor is that your field of view narrows. Field of view is dependant both on the focal length and the format (the size of your film or sensor). The ubiquity of 35mm film among amateur ...


19

Many years ago I tried splitting focus from the shutter because I was shooting action-sports. It took about a day to decide I liked it. One of the things we're supposed to do when we're shooting is keep both eyes open; That helps avoid fatigue from shooting for hours, but also lets us see what is going on around us. That is smart in case good action is ...


18

Back-focusing and front-focusing is when the auto-focus consistently is slightly off in either direction. This problem has always existed as long as auto-focus has existed, but it has come into focus (no pun intended) with digital cameras where you can enlarge the image to pixel level and really see where the focus is. You can test this with a simple setup ...


17

It's arguable whether this is "clear and easy to understand", but Thom Hogan has an interesting article on Hyperfocal distance - explaining that it's not quite what people think it is, and also why it's not necessarily a desirable effect. Here's a few quotes (emphasis mine): "Hyperfocal focus distance" is basically the focus distance for any given ...


17

Rachael, it sounds like your aperture is set to a wide aperture (low f-number), allowing lots of light in, but at the expense of a very narrow 'depth-of-field'. This creates a thin slice of focus where anything before or after is blurry. Let's assume you're 2 feet away from your subject when taking a photo with your 50mm lens. Most common SLR 50mm lenses ...


16

Check if your viewfinder has a dioptric adjustment knob - this is a little adjustment on the viewfinder that allows you to adjust for your eyes. It might be set for someone short sighted. If it is there then make sure the in-viewfinder display is visible, and adjust so that the display is sharp. Then try focusing on other things. You could also see if ...


16

The areas which are out of focus are blurred in a shape matching that of the lens opening. The final shape is usually circular when shooting wide open, but when stopped down, the aperture blades modify the shape, for instance, with 6 blades, the bokeh would probably be hexagonal. One example of circular bokeh: To really show this effect, you can use a ...


16

A focus limiter simply restricts the range of distances the camera will attempt to focus at. This improves both the speed of focus and the accuracy (as it is assumed you are only interested in subjects within the range you have selected). You tend to see them a lot on macro lenses, which can focus from a few centimeters up to infinity. Often a lot of ...


16

Front focus is when the lens and camera focus in front of your intended focus point. Your subject will look slightly out of focus and something in front of them will be razor sharp in focus. Back focus is correspondingly when something behind them is in focus, instead of your intended subject. As to why.. it could be mis-aligned, mis-calibrated equipment. ...


16

A very simple, yet effective method to achieve almost perfect focus is to use a Bahtinov mask. I believe that this is the "mask" that you were referring to. It is a diffraction mask that is placed on the aperture of the telescope, creating three diffraction spikes. When the image is in focus, the three spikes line up perfectly. If it is even slightly out of ...


16

Have you tried the High Pass Filter in Photoshop? Make a selection around the area of the image you need better focus on, press ctrl-J to jump this to a new layer. Then, in the Filter menu, scroll down to Other, and choose High Pass. Depending on how large your photo is, you might want to choose from 1-6 pixels. You will probably have to ...


15

Focusing rail is a type of camera mount that allows you to move the camera forwards and backward on a very small scale. (image taken from article at Earthbound Light) The reason for using them is that in macro photography you have such small depth of field that it's easier to focus lens to given distance and then move the camera to get the parts you want ...


15

I think that depends a bit on the construction of the AF mechanism in the lens. If there is resistance when turning the focus ring, this also means that there is greater force applied to move the mechanics, and so there is greater stress in the material. I would personally switch over to manual focus for that procedure.


15

The focus throw is simply how much you have to turn the focus ring when focusing, what's usually compared is how much you have to turn to get from closest focusing distance to infinity (or vice versa). A manual lens generally have a longer focus throw, to enable you to do fine focus adjustments, while an auto-focus lens has a shorter focus throw so that it ...



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