Open

by damned truths

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

27

With some lenses (mostly fast wide-angles) there's a possible problem from focusing and then re-composing: as you re-compose, what you originally focused on will no longer be on the plane of focus. With longer lenses, this is rarely much of a problem, if you're shooting with something like a 30/1.4 on full frame, your subject could be quite a ways out of ...


19

There are a variety of ways to display highlighted focus point indicators in the viewfinder. One of the earliest (yet still common) methods is to direct light back through the pentaprism to reflect off the rear-surface of reticles etched on the focusing screen or dedicated "superimpose plate". Displayed information is limited to highlighting the etched ...


16

Phase detect autofocus in DSLRs works by comparing patterns of light coming from each side of the lens using pairs of detectors which are separated a certain distance on the AF sensor. This distance is called the baseline, and the greater the baseline the more accurately the distance can be measured. The need for a wide baseline and for light to travel from ...


14

A number of articles have been written about the problem with the focus and recompose technique. While the general idea they espouse is theoretically correct, most of them are really actually wrong on a number of points. First and foremost, most of them assume that you want to focus at the extreme corner of your picture. While you can do that, it's pretty ...


13

Perhaps it would be helpful to select a non-center point if your camera is on a tripod and you have it set up so the framing is just right.


11

To get the definitive answer you can try to find and study the service or repair manuals for some cameras. For the stupid secrecy of the camera makers they are usually removed from the public access, but can be found elsewhere. This is a page from the Pentax K10D service manual; I don't know if you can figure from it how the LEDs themselves are positioned. ...


11

There are two main cases: Focus and recompose can cause misofocus when using really fast lenses as by rotating the camera the focal plane rotates and thus will no longer pass exactly through your subject. Most of the time the subject will still be within the depth of field so this effect goes unnoticed, however with shallow depth of field focus and ...


9

If you're trying to compose your photo so that the subject isn't directly in the center (using rule of thirds or similar composition), the selectable focus point is a big help. You can pick a point to the left or right of center (or any of the other points) and compose around that point. An alternate technique is focus and recompose, where you focus ...


8

Matt Grum is correct, your camera uses contrast detect and can focus anywhere in frame. According to user manual (page 82), your camera has two auto-focus modes - Face Detect and Center. So you can choose only one point, but in Face Detect mode, your camera will detect and show a selection of up to 9 faces, which is probably what the number refers to. ...


8

One situation where you want a different focusing point is when you have action shots you wanna take. Imagine a bike race for example and you want the rider in the left part of the picture, then you won't really have time for focus and recompose. Another application is shooting a flying bird. Of course you could use your AF Servo function to trace a moving ...


7

Modern auto-focus systems are designed to accommodate a wide range of shooting applications that require different ways of using the auto-focus system. Which way is the best for you depends on several factors: Your subject matter, your skill level, and which setup produces the most consistent and accurate results for the particular camera/lens combination ...


6

The additional AF points are essential for Action/Bird photography. I have enough trouble keeping fast-moving birds within the viewfinder, let alone keeping the center AF point over the bird. As it is, with the 9 AF points on the 5D2, It's quite challenging to even get a shot in focus. Take, for example, a Diving Pelican. You have something like 2-5 ...


6

I generally select the focus point that gets me closest to the majority of shots. For an example, in soccer, I'll select the point either above the midpoint or two above in the vertical orientation, and I'll select the midpoint for horizontal orientation. I would not be comfortable letting the camera pick the point. Then, if I want the subject off ...


6

Cross type focus points are slightly better than horisontal/vertical focus points. A cross type focus point is basically a horisontal and a vertical focus point in one. The only problem what you would have with focus points that are not the cross type, is that they have problem focusing on patterns that are horisontal or vertical, depending on their ...


6

In Live View, the mirror is up and the AF collimators do not have view of the scene and can't do any focusing. The EOS Quick Mode flips the mirror down, exposing the scene to the collimators and then flips the mirror back up. There isn't a way for a traditional mirror-equipped DSLR to show live view WHILE using the collimators to focus. The Sony Alpha DSLRs ...


6

I am not 100% sure what you mean. Looking at the viewfinder of my 500D, it looks like (Via Bob Atkins) If I take the liberty to add "thirds lines", it looks like this: Unless you mean "100% spot on!", this looks very much like spots in the intersections of thirds lines. (My handiwork is a bit shoddy on the second picture, I have to admit as well.)


6

As others have noted, there often are focus points near to the rule of thirds intersection points, but they aren't always precisely in that location. There might be some consumer demand for it, but there are two major reasons why not, both answered, I think, by my answers to What is the “Rule of Thirds”? and What is the 'Golden Ratio' and why is it better ...


5

Most Canon DSLRs can do it. On the EOS 60D this is called Quick Mode, despite it not being quick at all. You just have to select the option in the Camera menu. The other option is Live Mode which uses contrast-detection. It is called the same on the 7D and I believe very similarly on the T?i models as well but I don't have them here to check at this time.


5

The manual pretty much says no, the OK button on the rear controls this toggle. It does say, though, that when in the mode to adjust focus there's a little rectangular controller icon that appears in the viewfinder. I checked that on my K-5 and the icon will appear down and immediately to the left of the shutter speed value. So not ideal but at least there's ...


5

The thing you have to remember is that the areas of sensitivity for each focus point are larger than the representation of those points in the viewfinder. This is especially true when using zone focus. The camera will focus on the area of highest contrast within the entire area of sensitivity. This will not necessarily be the area directly behind the little ...


4

Perhaps a closeup of one of these tiny surface-mount LEDs would be interesting: That's magnified quite a bit -- the package is actually 1.6 mm long. The LED itself is the small square at the center with the gold wire connected to the top. I can't (of course) guarantee that this is exactly the same LED package used in the particular camera in question, but ...


4

Both the Canon 600D and the 650D have 9 focus points: the central focus point of the Canon 600D is cross-type, the others are not all the 9 focus points of the Canon 650D are cross-type.


4

When I started to use the new camera this was also the case, but more recently, when I hit the AF point selection button, the 9 red points appear, but only for a fraction of a second, and then disapear before I can make a choice. Select any of the Creative Modes (P/Tv/Av/M/B/C) on the top mode dial Press the Menu button Navigate to Custom Functions tab ...


4

Freezing motion is about controlling the light, more importantly it's about controlling the amount of time the light will strike the sensor. To do that, you have two basic options: Shutter speed Flash duration Shutter speed with ambient light is pretty tricky unless you have a lot of really bright light. The better way to go about this is to control the ...


3

Needs a firmware update to address; obvious solution is to allow the Fn button to be programmed to act as the AF selector then at least it is easily accessible during shooting. However, this needs people to tell Fujifilm that they would like this. I called the FujiFilm Pro Digital team (1-800-800-3854 Option #1 and then Option #2) and they put me through ...


3

You're using a method known as 'focus and recompose' which works well in many situations, however if you're not using the 'one shot' focus mode (using 'ai servo' for example) then there's a drawback to this. As you move the camera to recompose the shot the camera will re-focus to try and keep your original point in focus, which is not what you want. In this ...


3

Is is camera in full auto mode? It needs to be in M, P, Av or Tv. It may also not be enabled if in AI Servo (continuous focus) mode - correction, it appears it is enabled, see comment.


3

I've published a plugin recently which does what you are looking for: http://www.lightroomfocuspointsplugin.com It currently works in Lightroom 5, currently for all Canon + Nikon DSLR, additional cameras will be added in the future. Works on Mac and Windows. Hope it helps.


3

In short, no, Lightroom doesn't display the active focus point(s). The only software I've used that that does is Canon's Digital Photo Professional, although apparently Aperture also does. It seems there's a plugin under development to do just this but so far it's been developed for Mac + Nikon only. Also, from the Adobe forums: The focus points are in ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible