Butterfly

by Rodrigo

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0

I would go with ultra-cheap Tamron 70-300 OS or Nikon 70-300VR. I think they're both of equal design. At least that's word on street that they were from same specifications. Both are great for DX cams. Also, the 55-300, I believe, is good. Lost track of DX lens lineup. Just get VR in whichever lens because handholding without blur is nearly impossibly at ...


3

Theoretically, assuming two perfect lenses, which do not distort the image at all, but just achieve different fields of view, then the wider angle, from closer should have better image quality, assuming a perfect collection surface (sensor or film). Reasons for this would be less air to disperse the light between you and the subject, and less air for ...


0

Alaska has amazing photographic opportunities, but the weather does not always cooperate. It is a good idea to be prepared for the worst conditions, and that may affect your lens selection as well. As far as wildlife photography, be ready for close encounters (especially when driving a car or riding the bus in Denali), but most opportunities will require ...


0

On a trip to West Africa I packed a D80, an 18-200mm, and a small bog-standard 28mm for walking around urban stuff. I didn't want to carry a full tele, and on a cropped sensor that 200 was long enough for me. So, it really depends on how much you want to pack. For big vistas I'd like a super-wide, but then I'd also want a full-frame sensor. In my case, I ...


1

I marked this to be closed as its primarily opinion based. Personally, I would much prefer to have a 10-24 and 70-300 over the 18-200. For me, for such an awesome trip, 18 wouldn't be wide enough to make me happy and 200 wouldn't be long enough. (300 wouldn't be long enough, either, but thinking about staying light...) It's a personal choice. Your ...


0

I have my sigma 17-55 f2.8 almost always on my APS-C camera. Depending on the what you want to photograph, a pancake lens can be an option.


0

From what I understand choice of lens largely depends on where you want to be. If you want to be in the scene, right there with your subjects, 50mm and wider lenses will be your choice. If you want to be out of your scene, and have it largely unaffected by your presence, medium telephoto lenses is your choice. (Personally I prefer 85/1.8.)


2

The most suitable lens of your kit is the one that took the best/most promising images when you scouted the rail road track location beforehand. The first image has an interesting background with buildings and a bridge in addition to the railroad. It adds to the image. A wider lens can include more of the background and the surroundings. The second one ...


4

This is very much a matter of preference and taste. Henri Cartier-Bresson was inseparable from his 50. The same holds for Jean Gaumy. On the other hand photographers like Bruce Davidson and Joel Meyerowitz seem to have a preference for wider lenses like 35 and even 28. One thing is sure: Any focal length longer than 50 is not an option. An 85 will make great ...


0

I am (amongst too many other things) a 'Street Photography' enthusiast. The following is based on 'what works for me'. Tastes vary. For an APS-C camera I very strongly recommend a zoom with a minimum focal length of around 17 or 18 mm and a top end of as much as you can afford at the quality level desired. ie 17-55 mm is an excellent start, but 17-100+ mm ...


1

For street photography, using a long focal length can be a little crippling because you might lose some of the interesting perspectives given by shorter focal length lenses. Another thing to note is that with a short focal length lens, you can compose people into the frame and make it look like you're not really aiming at that person. If I see someone ...


6

I think you'll be best off with the 24-70mm zoom. You're going to want a smaller aperture than f/1.8 anyway -- at 10 feet, the 85mm set to f/1.8 will give you only a few inches of depth of field. Your example images have a lot more DOF than that. Using the zoom will give you a lot more flexibility with respect to focal length, and also let you change focal ...


-3

In my opinion they don't produce the same result. Here is the comparison. Imagine you using a macro tube. One optical element is moved away from the sensor to create magnification. What occurs here is you loose quality. Light is a dispersing medium over distance if ever so slight. You lose that slight to dispersion on the distance. Also your angle is ...


-1

I took the opportunity to simply go for it and do it. I placed the camera (40D, being APS-C) in the same position, that is, the body is the same distance from the subject in both shots. (I'm on a slow network, so I upload only the embedded previews from the raw files) The first one, with an EF-S zoom lens dialed to "50" The second one with a 50mm EF lens ...


6

Does mounting an EF vs an EF-S lens produce the same results on a camera body that has an APS-C frame size? Yes. They will produce the same results, assuming all the same settings, and similar optical performance between the two lenses, and 100% accuracy in the actual focal length of the lens as reported (manufacturers have been known to fudge the ...


4

The answer is yes. 50mm focal length is 50mm focal length, no matter what the mount is.



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