Not Your Everyday Banana

by Bart Arondson

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3

You're mixing up some terminology here, so starting with vocabulary, a "wide angle lens" is one that can go wide and give a you a very large field of view--a lens that takes in the scene. What "25mm wide angle" means is that when you're zoomed all the way out, the field of view you have is equivalent to what a 25mm lens would see on a 35mm film camera. ...


1

Note also that the old rule of thumb that a shutter speed of 1/30 second is fast enough for a sharp picture is not good enough in the digital age. In the analogue era you would not typically zoom a picture to see very small details, so a picture would look sharp and that was it. Today, we take one picture and zoom in expecting to see small details clearly ...


1

Use a tripod. Shutter shake is a very frustrating aspect of modern cameras. When I had my old Fujica 801 I could shoot at 1/60th of a second and take a sharp photo. I would not trust myself below 1/250th on my Fujifilm Finepic. Try shooting on a clear day - you will have more light and less problems to solve


0

The angle of view is a measurement of the view plane area of an optical system in arc degree.


1

Hard to see what you're asking. A given focal length and composition will always have the same character due to laws of optics. You're always going to see that effect, it has nothing to do with the subject. If you're asking whether some people look good that way, then yes of course they do — but that's your responsibility as the artist to make that happen. ...


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Your second diagram is exactly on point here. Or at least it is for traditional lenses (that is, lenses that are not internal focus). All you need to do is scale the diagram's width according to the focal length of the lens. Longer focal lengths mean that you are focusing closer (at distances less than infinity); that is, the distance between the lens and ...


0

Obviously this is an economic question. Get a larger aperture lens first. Then if you later decide to sell your crop body camera for a pro camera, you can keep using the lens. Large aperture lenses hold their value better than camera bodies do. Always put your money in glass first. Otherwise you're looking at reducing the benefit of the expensive (and ...


3

None of these are inherently better. A larger sensor has more area to gather light, which can be an advantage when light is scarce (but which is less of a factor when it's not). A larger maximum aperture (small f/numbers) can let in more light, but at the expense of less in focus, and again, if you have the light available, this may not matter. Both a ...


1

The bigger the sensor (not to be confused with size of image (number of pixels)), the greater the area there is for collecting light, and so there is less noise produced when the signal from the sensor is amplified. This i why full-frame cameras (those with sensors that are 24mm x 36mm) are better in most conditions where amplification will cause significant ...



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