Napioa - Wind Origins

Napioa - Wind Origins
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1

... as the adapter increases the distance between the sensor and the lens by ~10mm, does this effectively make my 50mm lens a ~60mm lens? Or am I just misunderstanding things? You're misunderstanding things. The Minolta MD/MC registration distance (or flange focal distance)--that is, the distance from the mount flange to the sensor, is 43.5mm. If the ...


1

The answers you've gotten are correct, a standard/correct adapter does not change the focal length. It is worth noting however that there are some adapters called Speed Boosters which are designed to do exactly that. They counteract most of the "crop factor" caused by the smaller sensor. They aren't cheap, but it's always good to know your options. For ...


3

Michel Thoby's webpage has the following formula for the equal-area projection: r = 2 f sin(θ/2) where r is the distance from the centre in the projection plane of a point that is visible under angle θ. (image source) For 10 mm focal length this gives r = 2 * 10 mm * sin(π/2 / 2) = 14 mm for the radius of the 180-degree image circle. This roughly ...


-1

The angle of view calculation requires trigonometry: This is the formula I use in Excel. =((ATAN((d/2/f)))x180/9.8596 d=the dimension of the frame 35mm full frame 24mm height by 36mm length diagonal 42.36mm f=focal length x=multiply 10mm = 100⁰ height – 121⁰ length 127⁰ diagonal 12mm = 90⁰ height – 113⁰ length 120⁰ diagonal 14mm = 81⁰ height – 104⁰ ...


0

Following a link in the answer provided by @Itai, I found this equation: For: focal length F minimum focal distance X extension L Then the new working distance is: F(XF +XL - Lf)/(XL -LF +f^2) I'm not sure about the validity of this equation or any of the assumptions that go into it.


4

The 35mm film camera format has been with us since 1924 when the German Leica was introduced. The image size (format size) measures 24mm height by 36mm length. Now digital cameras are replacing film cameras. Most were built to house a digital imaging chip that has the same format size. These are called full frame cameras. As technology marches on it has ...


-1

As I have said before: It's because the effect of any given focal length is a relation between focal length and focal plane - it's not literately a crop and 10mm lens doesn't have a specific fixed field of view. A 10mm lens is always a 10mm lens, however, what the field of view is with a 10mm focal length, depends entirely on the focal plane. So a 10mm ...


3

Because a 10 mm lens is a 10 mm lens. Crop factor has nothing to do with the real mm of a lens. Crop factor is the same as if you take your Photoshop and crop the center of a photo. Take a look at this answer: Do I use the crop factor in calculating aperture size and area? The crop factor equivalent is to give you "an idea" if you have being using a 35 ...


2

Will the focus change after i re-turn on the camera? Yes, but only if you are using a Canon STM lens. STM lenses will rack the focus in, and then out, when you turn the camera on, but it should return to the original focus distance. Non-STM lenses will not change focus.


0

Will the focus change after i re-turn on the camera? Of the DSLRs that I can think of, none changes the focus setting when you turn the camera off or on. However, if you have the camera configured to focus with a half-press of the shutter release, the focus may change if you try to take a picture. If you have the camera in your possession, it's easy ...


5

What lens would work for a canon 6D to take up close photos of birds far away in the trees? It comes down to three questions: How up close do you want to get? How far away are the trees? How big are the birds? In landscape orientation, your 400mm lens takes in 3.4 degrees over the height of the sensor and 5.2 degrees across the width. That means ...


1

The Canon 6D sports a full size image sensor measuring about 24mm height by 36mm length. We fit lenses to cameras based on the diagonal measure of the imaging area. In this case the diagonal measure is about 45mm. By tradition, we round this value up to 50mm. If a 50mm lens is mounted, and angle of view is delivered is label as “normal”. Mount a 100mm lens ...


2

I know what you mean about the big lens still not getting close enough. Tips though include: Set up an area if you can with a bird feeding station. Manage the type of food offered and the overall placement against a nice background. Although the 6D is your A camera, ideally your B camera could be placed on a tripod next to a feeder ready to be remote ...


2

You either need a longer lens (>400mm) or a telephoto extender. Telephoto extenders are a less expensive way to get additional "zoom" from your lens, but the image quality will not be as good.


2

Remove the supplemental lens from the phone-camera. On a sunny day, hold the lens between a white sheet of paper and the sun. The lens will project a tiny image of the sun on the paper. You start with the lens touching the paper and slowly increase lens to paper distance. When the image of sun is a tiny spot of light, the distance lens to paper is measured ...


-2

Focal length is the distance between the focus point on the lens and the plane of the image sensor. For example a 50mm lens set to focus at 10 ft has 50 mm between if's focus point and the sensor and 10 ft from focus point to subject.


0

There are two "magnifications" which are related to addon lenses: the maximum magnification achievable in combination with a given camera and relative (optical) magnification. To know maximum magnification (ratio between object size and image size at focal plane) you need to photograph a ruler parralel to the frame as close as possible and then divide the ...


0

In traditional miniature format photography (35mm... which equals an image dimension of 24 x 36mm) a 35mm lens was regarded as a moderate wide-angle lens. A 50mm lens was regarded as a 'standard' lens. The standard lens had an angle of view of around 46 degrees which approximated to that of normal human vision. That meant that when a photographer used a ...


1

The technical points basically boil down to three points Angular Resolution Distortion Perspective Since you need to get closer to the object using the 35mm lens, you are at least theoretically able to see more details. However, this is (a) only a small difference and (b) may be limited by by other factors like the sensor of the camera. 35mm lenses ...


17

The proof is in the pudding – the focal lengths are not exactly the same as yours, but the differences are obvious...


12

Thanks to my schwifty skills in Inkscape, the rotation here is slightly off but the following shows exactly what you're comparing. These are the fields of view of a Nikon 35mm (inner) and a Nikon 50mm (outer). So even when you're getting approximately the same stuff in the frame, the 35mm is much wider, focal distances are slightly different too. If ...


4

Do you have a selection of lenses (or a zoom lens) now? Shoot a table-top test with different focal lengths, repositining the camera to get tye same view of the foreground object. Then look carefully at the photos to see for yourself. If you're one of those peopke where this doesn't just scream at you, it's good to develop your eye to seeing the ...


36

If you shoot from the same position with both lenses, then taking the 35mm lens and cropping it to the same angle of view of the 50mm lens will give you pretty much the same picture, other than the differences in optical quality between the two lenses and the resolution lost to cropping. But even if you were to shoot with the same lens, shooting from a ...



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