Lunch atop a (Springfield) skyscraper

Lunch atop a (Springfield) skyscraper
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0

My understanding of a "normal" lens as a casual student dipping in and out of books and online courses is that 50mm lenses (as found on 35mm film cameras) replicates the same focused field of view as the human eye. Which also just happens to be approximately 50°. Though it is true that we see a much wider angle than that in our peripheral vision, how much of ...


0

So as my question says in the title, does my crop sensor camera really turn my lens into a longer one (in terms of magnification), or does it just look like it based on the reduced field of view I get? The size of the image projected on the sensor is the same in both cases. But a smaller sensor with the same aspect ratio and same total number of pixels ...


3

By the way, while the Michael's answer is absolutely correct and practical (you need a new lens!) it might be interesting to learn that you actually CAN achieve the same FF look without changing lens under some circumstances (other than stated in the question - it will not work with 600D and with street photography). And yes, technically this is a comment, ...


8

You can't. What we refer to as equivalence is only an approximation. You can't put a different lens on a crop sensor camera and get the same shot with the same field of view from the same shooting position with the same depth of field using the same ISO and the same shutter time as you can get with a full frame camera. The converse is also just as true. You ...


1

This is not an answer to your question, but a suggestion for your setup. In order to help minimize any extra glare or reflections off of the front of your negatives or slides, try to block out the rest of the light table. Or, create some "gobos" (black absorption panels) out of dark construction paper, or black matte-painted foam board, and use them to ...


2

Note the minimum focal distance of the 18-55mm STM is 0,25m so this is part of the limitation on what you can shoot. Photozone indicates the maximum magnification is at 55mm, which is probably what you should use regardless of "sweet spot". Distortion, CA and vignetting are best at f8 and above and resolution at f8 is as good as you'll get across the ...


8

35mm to 55mm at f/5.6 to f/8.0 will get you great results with the EF-S 18-55mm STM. I really like SLR Gear's visual interactive graphs for checking out lens image quality at various focal lengths and aperture settings. SLR Gear Lab Test Results This is what a GREAT lens looks like, and below is what a CRAP lens looks like:


0

Yes. Compact cameras label their lenses in "35mm equivalent focal length" which is pretty illogical in my opinion. Thankfully other non-35mm formats such as m4/3 and APS-C and the various medium and large formats do not do the same. What this means is that your camera with its tiny (roughly 1/2.3" format [though that's not the actual measurement, just a ...


2

It's highly likely that cheap CPs use materials that are less optically clear. The camera uses a smaller area of the lens/filter when zoomed in, therefore magnifying the optical artifacts of the CP, which results in less detail. This, combined with the fact that each lens has a sharpness "sweet spot" at a specific f-stop, and detail is lost to greater ...


2

Yes, this mean crop-factor of your camera (Samsung WB250F) is 6 Focal length is one of the ways to calculate crop-factor, divide 35 equivalent of focal length to the focal length on the lens P.S. The canonical way (as far as I know) is to use the size of the sensor and compare it with the size of fullframe sensor. Check here for reference


-2

A polarizing filter is likely the most useful accessory you can own. It works by limiting light rays that transverse the lens to just one direction of vibration. We use them to mitigate reflections. Additionally the polarizer acts like a UV filter in that it cuts haze seen in distant landscapes. The polarizer enhances clouds and intensifies sunlit vistas ...


4

The problem is the cheap CPL filter, not CPL filters in general. I have also noticed significant image degradation at longer focal lengths, but only with low quality CPL's. When I use good quality CPL there is no image degradation.


6

Hard to know from your post, but note that a CP filter will loose you between 1 and 2 stops of light, depending on it's setting. This significantly reduces the amount of light reaching both the sensor and the all important autofocus system. If you have a variable aperture lens, this means that longer focal lengths have a smaller maximum aperture and ...


1

Whether a zoom lens is constant aperture or variable aperture has first to do with the design, a secondly to do with mechanical factors like opening or closing a diaphragm. A zoom lens works by having some elements move to change the focal length. This works because of the equation for the focal length of a thick lens: (1) Phi = phi_1 + phi_2 - ...


6

The quality of a modern zoom lens is outstanding considering all the manufacturing problems encountered. The maker would love nothing better than to keep the maximum aperture constant throughout the zoom. This is more easily said than done. The f-number is a ratio. Mathematically we divide the focal length by the working aperture diameter to compute the ...


19

The entrance pupil can not be any larger than the diameter of the front element, and that is what usually restricts the maximum aperture of telephoto zoom lenses - not the physical size of the aperture diaphragm. The physical size of the diaphragm is only part of what determines the maximum aperture, expressed as an f-number, of a lens. Magnification ...



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