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by Jakub

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1

What's happening is that the sensor in your phone is (for the sake or argument) 1/10th the width/height of that in a full-frame camera. However, then lens in the phone is 10 times as 'wide' as that of the camera lens. The 2 cancel each other out and give you the same field of view. So you might have a 50mm lens on the camera and a 5mm lens on the phone. If ...


6

The confusion here comes in entirely because "35mm" is the common name for the 135 film format, also known as "full frame" — and it happens to be the focal length of the lens you are looking at. The specification is: 35mm equivalent focal length when used with APS-C sensor camera 52,5 And you are reading this as: Equivalent focal length = ...


0

The Focal Length of a Lens cannot physically be altered. It is the distance between the centre of a Lens and its focusing point, the camera sensor. Therefore, the Sony 35mm Lens has distance of 35mm from the sensor to the lens. (Please note, a lens may have several corrective elements within it, the measure is taken from the final glass nearest to the camera ...


0

The lens has a focal length of 35mm. Sony APS-C sensors have a crop-factor of 1.5 (same a Nikon - surprise - but different from the 1.6 of Canon's APS-C sensors). So when mounted on a camera with an APS-C sized sensor, the 'equivalent' focal length is 35 * 1.5 = 52.5mm. So this lens on an APS-C camera will have the same field-of-view as a 35mm lens on a ...


2

What's causing confusion here is that "35mm" in the spec refers to the format (more commonly known as "full-frame"). So the part of the lens spec that states: 35mm equivalent focal length when used with APS-C sensor camera 52,5 Should be read as: Full-frame equivalent focal length when used with APS-C sensor camera: 52.5mm


1

I would read that as the lens being eqivalent to a 52.5mm lens on a 35mm camera, when attached to an APS-C sensor camera.


1

The more correct term for this case is "equivalent field of view". The focal length of the lens doesn't change, the crop factor changes. Using a crop-sensor camera with this lens would be the same as using a full-frame camera with the same lens and extracting a crop from the center of the frame with the same size as the cropped sensor.


0

If you're using Adobe Lightroom, you will want to try out https://www.lightroomdashboard.com , it's going to tell you about focal lengths, apertures, ISO usage etc.


0

The sensor (SONY IMX214) diagonal is 5.867 mm (~1/3"). crop factor = diagonal of the 35mm frame / diagonal of the sensor = 43.3 mm / 5.867 mm = 7.38 FocalLenIn35mmFilm = focal length * crop factor = 3.82 mm * 7.38 = 28mm


2

Those numbers aren't directly related in any way: The sensor size is the physical size of the sensor. The focal length is how much the lens is magnifying stuff. Note that the A720 has a zoom lens with a focal length which varies from 5.8 mm (5800 µm) to 34.8 mm. The pixel size is the size of each individual pixel on the sensor. This obviously relates to ...


0

It is a little complicated as field stops values might be different so you be comparing apples to oranges. In general your focal length is like a radius so a lens that is 18- 55 millimeter change in focal length would have a 3.05 change in radius. Allowing that the 18 mm to be your reference picture, if you then adjusted to 55 mm you would be taking a ...


2

It just happens that I made some test shots from another question which demonstrate this perfectly. I happen to have two Fujifilm lenses which have the same filter diameter and same bayonet hood mount — 23mm and 56mm. I took two test shots with the 23mm at the widest aperture (f/1.4), the first with the correct hood and the second with the 56mm's hood. The ...


1

Most lenses from the major manufacturers have a proprietary connector that the hood uses to attach to the front of the lens. While you can purchase hoods that attach to filter threads, that doesn't guarantee the hood will work properly with a lens it can screw onto. This is because: I read that the focal length plays a role... It's even more involved ...


0

I read that the focal length plays a role in it Think what would happen if you put a lens hood meant for a telephoto on a wide angle lens: all your photos would include a lot of that lens hood. Wide angle lens hoods are much shorter than hoods meant for longer lenses specifically to avoid this problem. Is it true that not all generic lens hoods work ...


-4

The size of the front glass of a lens is determined by the following: the bigger the sensor, the bigger the front glass. Canon EF lenses, made for full-frame cameras, generally have bigger front glasses than EF-S lenses, made for cropped sensor cameras. the bigger the max aperture, the bigger the front glass: everything being equal, a 50mm f1.2 lens is ...



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