Moonlight

by Jakub

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1

An extension tube won't work because the amount of extension needed would limit you to only Macro photos. You would only be able to focus a few inches in front of the lens. A 1.4x or 1.5x teleconverter will work. Depending on the lens, you may need a 2x teleconverter to completely eliminate the vignetting at all focal lengths.


2

To increase the 28.8mm image circle cast by the APS-C lens to the 43.2mm image circle needed by the FF sensor, you would need to increase the focal length by a factor of 0.5, or one-half again. A 24mm lens would require a 12mm extension tube. A 50mm lens would require a 25mm extension tube. A 100mm lens would require a 50mm extension tube, and so on. That is ...


4

Yes... kind of. You'll be projecting the image to a larger size. If you move the lens out by a 1/3 of focus distance using extensions, shouldn't you gain the full frame image? With possible loss of infinity focus? Putting 35mm of extension on a 100mm lens or 10mm of extension on a 30mm lens isn't just a "you can't focus at infinity" but takes you well ...


4

Leica 10X binoculars show a field-of-view of 6.7°. This is slightly wider than a 400mm lens on a full-frame camera. The Panasonic FZ1000 has an equivalent 25-400mm zoom, so at its maximum it will appear slightly more zoomed-in than the binoculars, showing a 6.1° angle-of-view. The angle-of-view is the best way to compare these two because other measures ...


0

Pretty much any lens can focus at infinity, so I think to make sense, the question must mean maximum distance so that the image of subject is a usable size instead of a dot. Which is going to be hard for anyone else to judge, but a Field Of View Calculator should answer for individual purposes. See http://www.scantips.com/lights/fieldofview.html The Field ...


0

That is just Field of View, see http://www.scantips.com/lights/fieldofview.html For a calculator, and if you know trig tangent, the diagram at page bottom will explain how.


0

Angle of view is actually three different angles (diagonal, horizontal/landscape, and vertical/portrait), each of which is the measure of the angle at the top of an equilateral triangle measured from the focal point of the lens (where all the light rays cross) and spanning from the farthest points (corner-to-corner, left-to-right, or top-to-bottom) across a ...


2

You are correct in that a lower/wider aperture produces greater background blur. However, there are 3 things that help introduce more background blur - 1) the aperture setting, 2) subj-to-background distance, and 3) lens focal length. So, to get the most beneficial setting for background as possible, you would choose your lowest possible aperture, get the ...


0

Calculation goes as following. Angle of view will define effective (in 35mm sense) focal length of the lens. 58 degrees of angle of view will give you roughly 39mm focal length (if angle is measured diagonally). Your lens is (let's say) 6 mm by spec, that is 39/6=6.5 times smaller. Which means that sensor has crop factor of 6.5 (consider 1.5 for Nikon's ...



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