Orquid "Phoenix"

Orquid "Phoenix"

by ceinmart

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58

Fluorescent lights can flicker at twice the frequency of the current feeding them, which implies an entire cycle of the flicker will take between 1/100 and 1/120 second. During each cycle the light's intensity and its color temperature can change. Thus, if you're using a shutter speed of 1/100 second or faster, you might observe exactly these phenomena: ...


22

Balancing for fluorescent lights is harder than say tungsten. The reason for this is that tungsten bulbs produce the same sort of spectrum (set of intensities at different wavelengths) as a daylight balanced flash, just shifted. A fluorescent light doesn't have the same bell curve shaped spectrum, it produces a set of spikes at very particular frequencies. ...


22

Fluorescent lights are terrible news for photography, and this is just one of the reasons! They give out light which is missing a big chunk of the red spectrum, which can make skin tones look greenish and unhealthy, they are usually different colours from each other even if the tubes are the same type, and they change colour during the power cycle! Your ...


18

The problem with fluorescent lighting isn't the color temperature, exactly. You can generally adjust white balance to account for that. If there's a green tint, that can usually be compensated for with manual white balance. But the poor color rendering is harder. The problem is that by their nature fluorescent tubes only produce light in narrow ranges of ...


15

fluorescent lights flicker, they change both intensity and color 50 or 60 times per second (depending on where in the world you are). This produce inconsistent colors, banding at high shutter speeds and confuses the auto white balance feature. but the solution is simple, just make sure to only get complete flicker cycles during the exposure - the ...


13

I've also tried using CFLs in clamp lights for photography, and I've also been disappointed with the color rendering. Color temperature is a measurement that properly only applies to black body radiators, which produce a continuous spectrum. CFL bulbs aren't black body radiators and don't output a continuous spectrum, so the color temperatures claimed for ...


7

There are two things at play. One is the spectrum and the other is the shape of the light-source. If you place both types of light in a soft-box, you will be wipe out the difference in shape which will make the harsh look and appearance of imperfections, bumps, wrinkles match more closely. The spectrum of an incandescent bulb is more more uniform and ...


7

I think in this case, a diagram or two is probably the easiest way to get the point across. A typical "cool white" fluorescent bulb produces an output spectrum something like this: In this diagram, blue is to the left, green in the middle, and red to the right. As other answers have already pointed out, your eye/brain can/will adjust so you usually see ...


6

The key words in your question are "to my eye". The human vision system is fiendishly good at adjusting white balance. Fluorescents are anything but white, but your eyes perceive them as white nonetheless. If you look at some nighttime photos of a cityscape or a building exterior, photos with a lot of different light-sources visible, you will see that most ...


6

As you are taking this on a phone - it has no shutter, instead it scans the CCD matrix (i think top to bottom) to build an image. What you are seeing is the variation in the brightness of the CFL as the camera scans the CCD. these lamps have a running frequency of around 50-60 Hz, as does the picture on your CRT tv (scan frequency).


4

This is really a technical comment to accompany Matt's answer, not intended as a complete answer - others do that well enough already. Matt did a nice job of colour correcting the firelight scene :-) ! A look at the luminance and RGB information of the original show a very sorry looking light mix which he has redeemed very nicely. The orange lit street ...


4

As others point out the lights are essentially blinking different colors during your exposures. What's worse is that different flourescent lights are on different circuits, so may be out of phase by 180 degrees, and unless they installed the same temperature color bulbs in all the fixtures (unlikely), color variations through a cycle will be even greater. ...


3

I've had exactly this issue over this past weekend covering a national karate championship with 4 other shooters. Flash was not an option. For the multi coloured image which won't respond to one simple colour temp fix, I intend using Lightroom 4's new feature of painting with temperature and tint, a sort of roving gelled brush. Only doing it for the print ...


3

If you're going to use fluorescent bulbs, you want a full-spectrum bulb, probably with a "CRI" rating of at least 90 or so. I've used Ott-lite for a few years, but there are now alternatives that are considerably less expensive and provide (at least very close to) the same quality. If memory serves, one I've seen used that seemed to be quite good was ...


3

Fluorescent filters are for "converting" fluorescent light to closer to daylight (FL-D) or tungsten (FL-W). Generally speaking, with a digital camera there's not much need for a FL-* filter since you can accomplish the same thing (and more) with your camera's white balance setting. Shooting with film you would want an FL-* or some kind of magenta filter, ...


3

Your camera has the ability to manually set the white balance. Under most circumstances, the auto white balance feature works fine, but since it's very likely you're shooting JPEG, correction after the fact when it does get it wrong is probably going to degrade your image quality a bit. at any rate, page 90 of the English version of the manual for your ...


3

Now, my question is: Is this due to the TYPE of lighting (Florescent vs Incandescent), or is this a function of the lighting temperature typically found in Florescent as opposed to Incandescent? The effects have little to do with colour temperature, except in extreme cases you can always calibrate images for colour temperature provided it's reasonably ...


1

There are several things you can do, but almost all of them require taking the camera off of full auto. If you use the P (Program mode) setting, thw camera will still select the aperture and shutter speed for you, but you will be able to select more options for other things, especially White Balance. If you are not allowed to use flash at the gym: Set the ...


1

On auto, the camera tries to automatically adjust the overall tone of the picture. I would expect different sources of the problem: the fluorescent light sources are not all the same, then having mixture of light sources causes troubles at large distance photos, there is some dominant color, which tricks the camera into wrong choice of white balance ...


1

As far as quality of image goes, if your light sources and your camera are balanced properly for the color, it isn't a problem. Mixing different temperature lights can be a problem due to color casts. Ie, you balance for one light and the other one casts a color. The quality issue difference between CFL and Incandescents arises due to differing CRI or ...


1

It is a little of both. Most florescent bulbs are nowhere near full spectrum light. That is, they don't emit all of the wavelengths of visible light the way incandescent bulbs do. In the case of CFL bulbs tuned for 5,500K, they are usually much better than your run-of-the mill bulb made for an office fixture. This video tutorial shows how to make your own ...


1

Fluorescent lights are usually very green. We don't notice it with our eyes, as our brains auto-correct the white balance. The best fluorescent filter is the off switch on the wall, turn them off and use other lights -- strobes, sunlight, tungsten lights, etc. there are filters for strobes and other lights that convert their nice light to the green crud ...


1

If flash isn't an option but you're there officially and reasonably close to the action, what about halogen floods (poor man's studio lighting if you like). Many years ago I had some cheap 8' tripod mounted 500W floods designed for DIY work, modified to 3x500W each. Something similar may work here, at least to reduce the contrast from the fluorescents to ...



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