Sunset in Kruger

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5

If they're TTL-capable flashes, they're brand specific. And they only come in Canon and Nikon flavors. The manual-only models are not brand-specific and will work on any ISO-compatible hotshoe. It's not a 100% reliable guide (e.g., the YN-500EX is an exception), but generally any model that ends in a 0 is manual-only and brand-agnostic; any model that ...


1

The black bar you are seeing is the curtain from your shutter. Your shutter speed (1/500) is faster than your camera's flash sync speed (1/200). To get rid of the black bars, you either need to enable "high speed sync" on your flash (if it has the feature), or choose a shutter speed of 1/200 or slower.


2

If you're purchasing a new manual hotshoe flash that you will, presumably, be using off-camera Strobist-style, I'd look at and for the following features: Power The guide number is (sometimes) a good guide for this, but make sure you know the ISO setting and zoom settings that were used to measure the guide number. For some third party units (e.g., ...


1

If this is like every other Canon camera, Av exposes for ambient, and uses the Flash for fill. P assumes the foreground is the subject, so it exposes for that. For your Av photo, the camera found the subject very dark, so pushed to get as much light as possible, However, the fill flash was close to the subject, so it is over exposed. You can see that the ...


4

You see the curtain of your camera: nice, no? If you want to avoid that with mark III , use a shutter speed lower than 1/200s You could use high flash speed sync, but I am quite sure that your flash can't use that, so with this flash, your only solution will be under 1/200s or use a ND filter to have less light entering your lens Check this tutorial on ...


1

Found out the problem on my own. All is well now. I have 2 other YN 600's and the FEC w/bounce worked fine on those other two. So I kept tinkering with my 3rd/new flash until I got it working properly. Certainly a case of "user error" here. Here's the story: I have an event coming up soon where I expect to be using bounce flash "on the move." It's been a ...


1

You're probably using a shutter speed faster than your cameras maximum sync speed. check your camera's specs, and use a slower shutter speed. If you're using off camera flash with inexpensive third party triggers, you almost undoubtedly should be running both camera and flash in manual mode as well. run it manual, (typically) always keep shutter speed ...


0

If you select the last ETTL setting (press mode button 6 times after switching the flash on) and then just press the + button twice, it enables high speed flash. You can make sure its on by checking your flash settings in the menu of your camera.


2

1/400 second definitely exceeds your cameras maximum sync speed, which causes the black band. Try 1/160, or maybe 1/200 second. But in some other cases, we might not have exceeded the cameras maximum sync speed, but cheap radio triggers are notorious for causing a delay, and not being able to keep up with that max sync speed. Just lower your shutter ...


3

You exceeded your camera body's sync speed. The shutter speed in focal plane cameras, like most dSLRs, is determined by the gap between the 1st and 2nd shutter curtains. The bigger the gap, the longer the shutter speed. At a certain shutter speed (known as the maximum sync speed of the camera), that gap is only barely large enough to uncover the sensor all ...


12

You're shooting with a shutter speed faster than your sync speed (most likely 1/200 or 1/250). Your camera's shutter consists of two curtains -- the first one opens to begin the exposure, and the second follows it -- closing to end the exposure. At speeds slower than your camera's sync speed, these two curtain movements allow at least a tiny fraction of ...


1

My Jessops 360 AFDN got stuck on a Nikon D90. I tried almost everything mentioned above, except taking it to an authorised dealer. In the end I disassembled the flash to get it off.


1

You can use the guide number system (see How can I calculate the effect of non-TTL flash on exposure?), possibly in combination with your camera's meter or a separate incident flash meter. But if you have several lights, modifiers, and are trying different poses and positions, trial and error is probably actually easier and faster. As you practice, it'll ...


1

I'm not aware of any, and even though I'm not an electrical engineer, I think I can state with reasonable confidence that there aren't any, and won't be in the near future. That's because flashes work by storing energy in a capacitor, and it's inherent that the energy released from a capacitor starts out with a high voltage and tapers off, just as you see in ...


3

I can confirm that if you use a Yongnuo YN-622C, you will be able to trigger your canon speedlights. The setup that I have is 1 Profoto TTL Air remote, 2 Yongnuo YN-622C, 1 430EX II flash, 1 B1. One of the Yongnuo goes between the camera and the Profoto Air remote. The other on the speedlight.


5

Yes. What you're envisioning is something that's actually used by some TTL-capable radio triggers to allow faster shutter speeds with manual flashes and studio strobes: it's called tail-sync (aka "HyperSync", "Supersync", etc.). The problem, as Loong has pointed out, is that the light/power output of the flash pulse is not even and constant during the ...


10

In principle, your rationale is correct. However, there is no usable period during which an ordinary single flash is emitting at constant power. The power of a typical on-camera flash quickly increases from zero to its maximum value in about 0.1 ms (i.e. 1/10 000th s). Then it exponentially decreases with a half-life of roughly 1 ms; i.e., it decreases to ...


1

I think a key complication with doing it this way round is going to be getting the flash to be able to synchronise with the shutter at that level of precision. Eg, what happens if there is a long sync cord, or a radio trigger? They may cause different amounts of lag (I realise that the lag with a longer sync cable will be negligible and may not make a ...


0

This site may help answer your question conclusively: http://www.botzilla.com/photo/strobeVolts.html ...however, in my experience most hand flashes powered by AA batteries and using a single x-sync flash shoe (as opposed to multi-pin proprietary flash shoes) will be safe to use. I have used half a dozen random flashes from the 1970s and 1980s on my D700 and ...



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