The Perfect Sunrise

by NULLZ

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0

What I don't understand is how TTL and preflash work when there are 3 flashes firing at the same time. The answer may be somewhat dependent on the system that you're using. In Canon's system, and probably others, each flash group emits a separate preflash. The camera can then determine power levels for each group based on the total light needed for ...


0

Since all flashes fire at the same time (triggered by a pre-flash or radio signal) the camera does the exact same exposure check it does without flash. TTL means through the lens, so it just looks at how much light hits the sensor. There are different exposure measurements, like e. g. "global metering" (as I'll simply call it), which uses complicated ...


0

I think you're out of luck at the moment...unless you read Chinese (all the listings say that the English manual is "coming soon" and the flash was only released in late May 2014). Flash Havoc reports that the flash still requires considerable "refinement" (read: needs fixes), and that they don't recommend purchasing it yet. There are reasons not to cheap ...


1

While the specifics are somewhat brand-dependent, this question has essentially been answered already in one of your follow-up questions. Start with the following assumptions: There is no magic involved; everything that happens will be as simple as it possibly can be and still work; The system is not and cannot be foolproof; any sufficiently advanced fool ...


9

Editing out the eyes removes a metric tonne of information that might have been helpful in answering your question — please don't do that if you're asking about studio lighting problems — but there is still something to be seen in the photos you have posted. Apart from the makeup and post-processing that have already been mentioned in the comments, it's ...


0

Pixel and Phottix radio flash triggers have Sony/Minolta hotshoe versions, but you can just use hotshoe adapters with any manual radio triggers, since TTL communication doesn't matter. If you need TTL over radio the Pixel Kings and Phottix Odins both have Sony/Minolta hotshoe versions (but they obviously don't support the newer Sony iso-compliant hotshoe ...


1

Get a smaller, lighter external flash unit. They come in more than one size and you should be able to find one that fits your needs. As an added bonus, it will still probably work better than your original built in flash.


1

I just took a few test shots with YN-622C triggers and my YN-568EX (I usually use them in M, so hadn't thought to test eTTL function), and with the single speedlight, if I had wireless and groups on, I was getting consistent underexposure. If I turned wireless off, eTTL exposure was spot-on. I did NOT get inconsistent exposure or missed fires. I also tested ...


1

There are a few new systems appearing on the horizon that look like they will allow power control from any iso-compatible hotshoe, including those of mirrorless cameras like mft and Fuji X. But they're typically flash-and-trigger combination specific and are likely to be manual-flash-only on mirrorless. AFAIK, there are no full-function-TTL-capable radio ...


3

Bad news: the botzilla table of sync voltages reports that the sync voltage of the 260T is 220V. The Fuji X hotshoe, as far as is known, has a limit of 50V. Hopefully the flash simply doesn't work, and you haven't fried your Fuji X's hotshoe. If you have to use this flash, I'd suggest getting a Wein SafeSync. It would probably be better to get a modern ...


2

It only requires two values to figure out. Before the pre-flash it knows how much light is ambient. For the pre-flash it knows how much light the scene gets from the flash at a fixed power. It knows how much more or less light is needed for a standard exposure and simply sets the flash power accordingly since it knows exactly how effective the flash is ...


2

The metering flash is almost always relatively low powered. The camera compares the amount of light the metering flash produced to the amount of the pre-flash light that is reflected back to the camera by the subject. It then computes what percentage of light was returned from the metering flash, assumes the same proportion of light will be returned at any ...


4

There isn't nearly as much to figure out as you seem to think. Let's say that you have a scene in front of you that is nicely illuminated and doesn't really need flash at all, and you meter for, and set a manual exposure for, an ambient exposure that would have been absolutely perfect. Then, for some inexplicable reason, you decide to add manual flash ...


2

For multi-flash TTL setups, the photographer first puts the flashes in groups and then adjusts the power between those groups by setting up power ratios. (Say for example that Group A should have 4 times the power of Group B, or a 4:1 ratio.) Prior to the pre-flash, the master flash communicates these ratios and the overall power level to be used to the ...


0

In modern TTL systems, camera sends digital commands to flashes (by means of optical, radio or wired signalling). First, a preflash at minimum power before actual exposure is triggered and measured to calculate how many times the power of flashes should be increased in order to attain desired exposure. This power level is then communicated to slave flashes. ...


2

I would suggest Canon Speedlite 320EX. It is relative cheap and matches price class of your camera body. It is also less powerful than 600EX, but in studio it does not matter so much. If you need powerful flash anyway, then Metz offers a wide choice for far less prices than Canon, but be advised that build quality is considerably lower as well.


6

No The 600D uses the built in pop-up flash for the focus assist light, the pop-up flash pops up too close the the external flash if one is connected - there are many external flashes and accessories that would be hit by the popup flash if it tried to open when they are connected. So, as a safeguard the camera will not open the popup flash if there is ...


0

I doubt there'd be a generic SU-4 type unit, given that all you have to buy to duplicate the function of one is a "dumb" optical slave that can connect to the SB-25's PC sync port or hotshoe, such as the slaves from Sonia or Wein. The very inexpensive ones probably won't ignore an iTTL pre-flash like the SU-4 mode/unit does, but then the SU-4 doesn't ignore ...


4

One thing to realise is that in your example it is actually impossible for the camera to make the whole picture look "right" when you're using the flash. White balance will make a particular colour of light look white in the end image. However, when you have two different colour lights e.g. post sunset sunlight (probably mixed with yellow street lights) and ...


2

Yes, it is in a sense the camera not being smart enough. It probably tries to guess the color temperature of the light source(s), which light the main subject. In the case of flash, it has an easy job - it knows the color temperature of the flash. So, it probably just assumes that your main subject is going to be lit by this. We are still quite far from ...


2

your 3 images are al expected. Your flash is very little impact. You see impact on the metal pole to the right and the ground in front of you (look at the lower left). Your flash tells your cameras it near daylight 5500K WB) so it sets that WB. In both images with flash. The ground in the bottom and the right metal pole has a nice color with that WB but the ...


2

The brightness of the light from your flash falls off with the square of the distance to the subject. For example, if you are using only flash for illumination and something 10 feet away is exposed properly, then something 20 feet away will be 2 f-stops (4x) darker. Something only 100 feet away will be 100 times (almost 7 f-stops) darker. Conversely, the ...


1

There's 2 things to consider. Firstly the overall contribution of flash compared to ambient light. If the flash is putting out a small amount of light compared to the total ambient light over the course of the exposure then the flash itself and any changes to the flash will go unnoticed. Secondly flash exposure compensation only biases the flash metering ...


0

With an exposure time of 5 seconds, with the amount of light being gathered, the relatively far distance of almost all subjects, and the relative weakness of the flash used, I would expect there to be very little difference. The difference between photos 1 & 2, and photo 3 is the white balance.


5

The biggest problem with white balance is not inacuracy of cameras, rather the wide range of colour that the human brain automatically "corrects" to white. How is the camera to know what artistic effect you are looking to create when it is in auto white balance? The colour temperature shifted because you used the flash, so the camera assumed that it ...


-1

Check to see if you accidentally set your camera to bracket photos. This happened to me last night.


0

Surprisingly, but after three days the voltage on the board connector was still more than 200 Volts! So I have to state that the capacitor have very low self discharge current. I connected the resistor directly to the board connector as I could not reach the dedicated contacts on the flash head.


1

The D610's maximum sync speed is 1/200s. If you have set your shutter speed higher than this, and you are not using Auto-FP (high-speed sync) or you're using a flash that cannot do high-speed sync, you get dark bars at the top and/or bottom of the frame. Essentially, the shutter speed on a camera is controlled by the gap between the 1st and 2nd curtains. ...


0

No, the 430EXII does not have a "dumb" optical slave built in. None of the Canon EX speedlites do--the only "slave" capability that's built in is for use in Canon's proprietary light-based triggering system. The 430EXII can act as a slave to a Canon master unit (pop-up flash in a 600D or later dRebel, 60D or later XXD, 7D, and 1DX, ST-E2, 90EX, 550EX, ...


0

Your shutter may be going bad. Needs to go back to the factory. Does this happen when you use flash? If so, that would simply be a sync problem. Use a slower shutter speed.



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