Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway

Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway
by Saaru Lindestokke                

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0

Don't forget that when using E-TTL you can also apply different power ratios and flash exposure compensation to each group independently. In your example of the hair light you can either change the power ratio of the key light to the hair light. Or if you are only using a single flash you can dial it up or down using FEC. And by selecting the Av exposure ...


0

The basic answer is really that TTL flash isn't all that important in many situations, and that most of the situations where off-camera flash might be used fall into that camp. If you're in a place where the light doesn't change much, any exposure automation is not a big deal, let alone flash automation. It's handy for the first exposure of the session, and ...


1

The same is true when the flash is on the camera, facing away from the subject into empty space with nothing to reflect it back to the subject. The point of TTL is to adjust flash power automatically under the assumption that it has an influence on the scene. If the flash is on camera or not is not too relevant. In event photography or photojournalism for ...


0

You can get some cheap flashes and use them as slaves. I believe flash like that costs around $70. Do not use light sources with different color temperatures (like flash plus IKEA lamp)


0

I feel you still need to provide more information, for example if the gecko is going to be on a flat background or a "natural" environment, some branches here and there. But In reality the gear you already have can do. 1) Use it on a big white board, or use a big softbox or umbrella on the top of the set. Use the second flash with another difuser as fill ...


0

Lets look at another area. The B.I.F. (Built In Flash) The "BIF" Spring assembly is to blame for not allowingth flash to charge up and flash. NOTE: Discharge the capacitor FIRST. This is a very easy repair and requires few simple tools to complete. Remove the two micro small screws that hold the BIF cover on. Remove that cover and look along the sides, at ...


1

This is an apparent design flaw. The YN685 is a very inexpensive superficial copy of the Canon 600EX. I wouldn't call it a "clone" as that implies more similarity than actually exists. The Canon 600EX (and prior flashes such as the 580 and 580-II) project a pattern of horizontal bars that provides a good target for the camera focusing mechanism. The ...


0

It seems completely useless if the grid isn't aligned with the center focus point Well, I hope the misalignment is not to the sides. If it is poining up take a look at this: http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/54160864 This depends on the focal length you are using. The misalignment would be more on a longer lens. If the beams were pointing down, they ...


-2

High speed syinc in the case of your camera, is not limited by your camera, but by your flash. So the answer is yes, your camera can do high speed sync (teoricly, any camera), but your flash don't. A High speed sync flash makes a series of flashes to make a longer duration light. In this case the point is not to have a brief fast single output but a longer ...


2

No, the D3300 does not support high-speed sync, (none of the D3x00 or D5x00 bodies do) so you're limited to 1/200s and below shutter speeds. Anything faster, and you will have black bars on the image. In addition, your (one assumes Neewer) TT-560 is a manual-only flash and cannot perform TTL or HSS, which is why it's so super-cheap. It only has the ...


3

I love photo math but that approach will drive you crazy and nothing will come of it. The Guide Number method is tried and true. Once you know the guide number for your flash or combination of flashes, you divide the subject distance into that value. Suppose the guide number is 200 and the subject is 18 feet from the camera. The math is: 200 ÷ 18 = 11. ...


0

Using the guide number 100, the f/number setting for 5 feet is 100 ÷ 5 = 20. Thus we would set the camera to aperture f/20. For a subject 25 feet distant, the math is 100 ÷ 25 = 4. Thus we set the aperture to f/4. Using the inverse square law, this is indeed a 25x reduction. The problem is actually the complications of dealing with the focal ratio number ...


5

However, 25 is NOT 2/3 of the way between 16 and 32. You just have to remember that the scale is exponential, not linear. 4 2/3 stops allows 24.66 more light, and 24.66 = 25.28132..., or roughly 25. It's actually 9/16 (0.5625). Meaning that 25x less light is actually 4.5625 stops less bright, rather than 4.66 stops. Again, you're mixing linear and ...


0

Please note that the Metz Mecablitz 64 AF-1 flash has a radio receiver, but it does NOT work with the YN transmitter. According to the flash manual (page 191, "Remote Slave Flash Mode"), it's compatible with the Nikon "Advanced Wireless Lighting" system, which apparently is different than the YN's system. BTW, the Nikon SU-800 is $337 in the U.S., while the ...


1

No, you can't. To quote from v5.0 of The Other YN-622C User Guide II, page 20: The Canon YN-622C is NOT compatible with the Nikon YN-622N. The camera codes are not the same. This actually makes sense when you consider the completely different pin/contact arrangement on the hotshoe and the inevitable differences in signal protocols. The only way I ...



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