Lightnings taking a ride

by ceinmart

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Your built-in flash has no manual mode. The TTL pre-flash is causing the optical slaves to fire at the wrong time. The easiest solution is to use a simple manual flash in the hotshoe of the RX10.


2

You need three RF-603II units: one on the camera to act as trasmitter, and one on each flash to act as receivers. The YN-568EXII does not have any built-in radio slave capability. All its slave modes are optical, and to be used with the RF-603IIs, a flash must be out of all the slave modes (because they tell the flash to listen only to the optical sensor, ...


2

The RF-603C II is a radio transceiver. The YN-568EX II has a built in optical receiver, but no radio receiver. To use a wireless radio transmitter like the RF-603C with the YN568EX-II you need to attach a radio receiver compatible with the transmitter you are using. The built-in optical receiver of the YN-568EX II will only work with an on camera flash or ...


0

It is just a diffuser and also great protection, I haven't seen anybody take it off really. Left it be there.


0

I'd think an extra set or two of rechargeable NiMH AA batteries (Eneloops) should do it. For the small flash, it should easily do 200 or more flashes per set, then it only takes a second to swap out the batteries. One set could be recharging while the other set is in use.


1

You can pretty much ignore the baffles. Just duct tape a CTO gel sheet/s to the inside of the softbox between the two diffusers. Been meaning to play with this for a while and it works nicely. I used a white lit background, set a custom white balance to cancel out the CTO and the background turned a lovely, evenly lit blue. Also used a grid to keep the ...


0

I'm kind of confused by your question. The YN-568EXII is Canon-only. There is no Nikon version. And e-TTL is Canon's flavor of TTL. The Nikon version is i-TTL. If you're trying to shoot with Yongnuo's for-Canon gear with a Nikon camera, you cannot get TTL or HSS on the hotshoe or on radio triggers. You can only get TTL and HSS through CLS (Nikon's "smart" ...


0

Use a Yongnuo 622N-TX transmitter on the hot shoe of your camera and a Yongnuo 622N trigger on each of the 568 EX II N flashes. You can also buy them together in various combinations of 622N-TX and 622N units. You could use a 622N for the transmitter, but the settings are nowhere near as intuitive with the 622N (no screen, just status lights) as with the ...


0

I did some research on flashes. Im not a pro or living on profits from photography. I have the Nikon D5200 with an assortment of lenses. I wanted the Nikon SB-910 but it was way out of my justifiable price range for a hobby. However, I found a clone of the SB called a MK-910 by Meike for $103 which is lot cheaper than the $550 option. I ordered the ...


1

I do the same thing with my Canon 100mm macro lens and I can't see any difference whatsoever in the photos, since the adapter is built NOT to cause any vignetting. In the end, if you are happy with the results and don't notice anything wrong with them, why not leave it on? Mechanically, there's nothing that say you shouldn't do it.


0

Probably the best source of soft light is natural light through a window, doorway, etc. As AJ points out, it's about finding a large source of light. It's usually suggested that you use a north-facing window if you're in the northern hemisphere, since you'll get diffuse light as opposed to direct sunlight through the window.


5

The biggest source of information about a lighting setup are the highlights in the eyes. You see one big blob of white in the upper half of it. This is very likely a one light setup. And that light comes from the top. Next thing to find out is what kind of light it is. For that, look at the shadows. The top hair provides a shadow line to examine. Even ...


2

The idea is to overpower the relative ambient light with the flash. So the first step would be to diminish the ambient light, with either shutter speed, ISO settings, and probably ND filter. If you use a fast shutter speed function on a flash, there is a chance the flash will not work with full power but a fraction, because it is using a series of bursts. ...


1

You could try using a Neutral Density (ND) filter to reduce the amount of light that enters the lens. This also allows you to have a more open aperture and get a shallower depth of field when shooting. The type of ND filter you should use depends on how dark you want it, but for outdoor portraits when it's sunny, you'd typically use a ND102 or ND103 filter, ...


1

I think logic will tell you what the problem is: When all three modes are used without flash, the image looks the same. When all three modes are used with flash, the images are different. So, let's investigate the flash. Now, what makes a flash work? Well, we have a power source, a xeon bulb, and a large capacitor. More than likely, your batteries ...


5

In general, no, not only do you not need it, but it won't help at all. In order to provide any meaningful amount of light more than a few feet away, you need a very, very powerful flash — much more than you can get in anything battery powered. Unless you are right on the field — less than ten feet away from your subject — even an expensive hotshoe flash ...


0

I cannot say much about the NEX-5R, but these are general flash topics on which I can speak. And I have looked at the online NEX-5R manual to verify. Generally many cameras have Auto modes, and they have A,S,P,M modes. Auto is fully auto, and A,S,P,M are not (not fully auto). For example, P mode is automatic exposure, but it will NOT be auto ISO and Auto ...



Top 50 recent answers are included