Shadowy Daisy

Shadowy Daisy
by damned-truths

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0

The essence of your problem is the high differential in brightness between the subject and the background. And you are forcing yourself to use a tight aperture to get the depth of field you want. Using a higher focal length lens and backing farther away from the subject will help with depth of field, but I know of only three solutions to the light ...


1

Do you want the short answer or the long one? Some viable options or the best one? The long one. I am worried here. There are toooooo many basic points on the question. So I am preparing a check list of points you must further investigate. I will just write a basic tip on each point. No bokeh: What aperture gives bokeh and which not? Do not use a wide ...


0

You could try positioning the model near to the entrance of the tunnel in the sunlight and then use a long lens to fore-shorten the tunnel so the far end looks large behind them. Also, consider what other light sources do you have available. Car headlights?


6

(Some people might hang me for this but) You could take two shots and photoshop/merge them together afterwards. To do this you would have to take two shots from the exact same spot, maybe use a tripod. Take the first shot with the right settings to get your desired exposure for the outisde bit of the tunnel. For the second shot with the model use either ...


1

If you don't want bokeh, the first step is to find the aperture your lens produces sharp results for the model and the landscape in the distance. Something between 8 and 11 might be OK. Depending on the light situation inside the tunnel you probably won't need full power output of your flash or none at all. This is something that really depends on the ...


0

If you have too wide a range of EVs, and if you didn't have a set of flashes, I suggest you: Make an HDR at 7 fps (or more) by using a tripod with a constant aperture value by using the bracketing option.Then you will be able to remove ghosts by using "photomatix pro" or another software. With a tripod also, take a separate picture of the model in the ...


0

Check to see if your Nikon uses the same flash metering algorithm as Canon - when set tot aperture-priority but with the flash on, the camera will sett he aperture & shutter speed to correctly expose the background (the outside of the tunnel in your case, but it might get confused if too much of the dark tunnel fills the scene) and uses the flash to ...


6

Sounds like you want the outside of the tunnel to be properly exposed and not blown out. Meter for that and with your camera set to full manual mode use the settings suggested by the light meter. Take some test shots to fine tune the exposure. You are limited with an on camera flash but try adjusting the power of the flash with the flash compensation ...


1

The option C is: That guy does not have a clue of what he is doing. The first explanation is just a cheap excuse. The second one is plain dumb. flash can make objects look darker against a white background. The lack of control is the one that causes objects look darker. When you fire an automatic flash, it fires a small pre-flash, this is a flash ...


2

As everyone else is saying, better than nothing, so not completely useless, but in no way to be confused with a proper large softbox. You'll still be better off taking the flash off-camera rather than leaving it on-camera. You will still get an edge to your shadows. And there will be a hotspot. But if used in close, it can be worthwhile. I use a cheap eBay ...


2

Is what he said correct, and why? No. What he told you is utter horse hockey. Light travels in straight lines; regardless of its color, no background can "attract light away" from a subject. There are a number of explanations for what happened given what you've told us. Some possibilities: CVS guy didn't allow enough time between shots for the flash to ...


2

1) If the flash is falling on both the subject (in this case: you) and the background, 2) If the subject is sufficiently close enough to the background that there's not a lot of light falloff between the subject and the background, and 3) If the background is more reflective than the subject then using a camera set to an automatic exposure mode could ...


0

Unless your shutter speed is 1/30 second or slower most newer Canon EOS bodies will use first curtain sync regardless of what is selected in the menu of a compatible flash (or via the camera's menu itself if the camera has the capability of controlling the flash via the camera menu). I can find no mention of the requirement for a 1/30 second or slower ...


1

Godox has several lines of flashes (everything from speed lights to studio strobes) that are manual with HSS. The challenge is HSS requires the trigger interface with the cameras proprietary flash protocols and so if you're doing all that you might as well do TTL. Godox gets around this by making HSS an off-camera only function. So the flash has a single ...


0

I would not recommend the Yongnuo flashes; they have great features for the money, but are prone to failure (my 560 III got stuck on full power; that seems to be a common ailment). I like the Nikon SB-28 mentioned here already, although incorrectly mentioned as having an optical trigger, which is only on the SB-26. I also like the Minolta 320x; it isn't ...


0

I guess I would try a test environment where the flash is contributing 100% (or nearly) of the light instead of 60%. Also, another simple experiment of setting the flash correctly based on guide number and distance (fstop = GN / distance) and taking a test shot, then significantly increasing the power and trying another test shot at the same fstop should ...


0

Try sampling the yellow from the top left and paint it over the grey area with Color blending mode.


-2

You did ask about how to fix your image "in computer" not "in camera." I think you had a good idea, and with a little information you won't have to use post processing to fix issues in the future, only enhance what you like. What did you want to see in this image? Did you want the background AND the model to be rim lit in yellow? How far off is this from ...


2

Both Nikon and Canon use ISO-compatible flash hotshoes on their cameras and feet on their flashes, so the Canon flash will fit on the Nikon hotshoe, its sync voltages are well within the limits a Nikon hotshoe can sustain, and the ground signal (rails) and sync (fire signal--the pin in the center of the foot's square) will be recognized and work, so the ...


2

No, you can't. The ST-E2 is like a headless 550EX--it doesn't grok/speak the commands from the camera menu. You'd need a 580EXII or later hotshoe unit as master to have that kind of control. If you don't have the cash to spring for the RT flash system or you want a small optical master, your best bet is probably to ditch the ST-E2, and get a 90EX instead. ...


1

The subject of your question is flash synchronization. A little background information will help you understand. Your camera sports a “focal plane” shutter design. This mechanism uses a curtain, not unlike a window shade to cover the entire image sensor chip. Thus its normal state is closed and since it is opaque, it prevents light from the lens from ...


1

Despite your photographic "evidence" to the contrary, the flash is probably faster than the shutter; however, the synchronization between the two is not timed optimally for faster shutter speeds. You don't have much choice modifying the settings to better synchronize the two. You'll have to leave the shutter open for the flash to occur before you close the ...


2

At high shutter speeds, the closing shutter curtain chases the opening curtain across the frame, so the shutter is never 100% open. The flash has a very short duration and this means that while the flash is lit only part of the frame is visible through the shutter. The exact shutter speed that you'll start to see this issue, depends on the model of camera - ...


1

The Cobra Auto 210 is reported to have a very high flash trigger voltage. As you can see from Can using an old flash damage a new DSLR?, this is not safe. Earlier Canon DSLRs could only handle 6V — yours should be able to handle up to 250V, but it's possible the Cobra flash exceeded that. (Also, there is some lack of clarity on whether 250V is okay through ...


0

[caveat: I am not a Canon expert] Image From the photo it appears that the flash is firing at a low power setting, e.g. the reflection over the skinny man with a tie center frame, various pieces of jewelry, etc. Scene By all appearances the scene appears to have relatively little ambient light and therefore wide aperture, slow shutter and high ISO are ...


2

Assuming "indoors" means flash, the usual reason for a shadow on right side of the subject is that you are holding your camera turned up on end in portrait orientation. This puts your flash on the left side of the lens, causing a visible shadow outline behind the subject on (your) right side. This is the purpose for flash brackets, to let the flash rotate ...


2

When indoors the light meter sensor determines that the ambient light is insufficient. The camera logic orders the flash to fire. The flash thus supplies the additional light needed. In most cases, if the camera is close to the subject, the light from the flash provides the main light for the scene. Now miniature cameras sport a flash that is quite close as ...



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