Serene Life

by garik

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4

Trigger is a more generic term that can cover transmitters, receivers, transceivers, optical slaves, etc. It just means a device that can trigger the flash burst. A transmitter, very specifically means a radio transmitter that sends the triggering signal. You can use Phottix triggers on other brands of flashes, but how much function you can get might be ...


0

TL;DR: a synthetic rubber based adhesive is what you want From the service manual for Nikon SB-600 speedlight, you need to use Adhesive J67017 - rather cryptic. Googling this finds another Nikon service manual that says this product ID is for Cemedine 575. This is a japanese brand of Chloroprene Rubber adhesive - so any synthetic rubber based adhesive ...


0

But if I use an f-stop that is high enough to blur the background, my shutter speed only goes up to 1/250s, which produces overexposure. Flash photography is a little different in that you can't use the shutter speed to control the amount of light due to the flash. That's because the duration of the flash at full power is typically around 1/250 sec., ...


0

Not exactly sure of your setup, but they sell diffusers that attach to the flash. The quickest way, however, is to aim the flash at a light colored wall or ceiling instead of directly at the subject. Here is an example. Not only will it reduce the flash intensity, but it also softens and can often eliminate shadows. It is a good all around technique that ...


1

I've been exploring use of flash for the first time myself, using 50mm f1.8 lens. For me I get best results in camera manual mode (pick shutter speed and aperture), and then fine-tuning my flash's manual settings (i.e. for camera settings I leave them stable, and just tinker with the flash). For example - I find flash power 1/16 and zoom 105mm gives really ...


0

The SB-700 has a "distance priority manual mode" (GN on the mode switch) that lets you configure the distance to the subject and have the flash power set based on that. It's still manual in the sense that you control exactly what results you get, but will assist you with some of the maths involved.


3

With manual flash and camera in manual mode, I think you already hit on one method of "metering" ... trial and error. Take a picture, chimp, adjust. Repeat until lighting is what you want. The other way is to use a handheld light meter.


1

I'll assume you have tried the following: reducing the power of the flash moving the flash further from the subject placing a diffuser between the flash and the subject to absorb a bit of light These will all reduce the amount of illumination arriving on your subject but may not be ideal for your situation. This is an atypical situation -- most ...


1

Is there a way to use HSS off-camera with the current equipment, or with additional minimum investment? You can use a Canon 90EX as a relatively inexpensive ($129) master unit that will drive the 430EX II in slave mode. The 90EX doesn't offer high speed sync itself, but it works fine with the 6D to trigger slaves such as the 430EX II that can do HSS.


0

I bought the Neewer/Viltrox f210. They doo Ettl and HSS. Their only drawback is they're not very rugged. Functionally they are fine. $50/pair so I bought and extra two


3

Here are some options: Find some shade If there's too much light for your style you need a location with less light :-) in mid-day sunlight you may need something pretty big to block enough light but still it's an easy option Shoot at a better time of day At early morning and late evening there's less light and you'll be able to get the aperture/shutter ...


0

You don't mention what kind of flash you are using. If You are using a Canon Speedlite, You should make sure it is set to ETTL otherwise, If you are using a manual flash You need to turn the flash power down.


11

Your camera is limiting your shutter speed to the 60D's maximum sync speed. If you were to use a faster shutter speed, you'd have black bars at the top and/or bottom of the frame, because the shutter curtains would be covering part of the sensor when the flash burst goes off. The only way to use a faster shutter speed than 1/250s with flash it to use ...


9

The trigger voltage you are worrying about doesn't come from the camera; it's all in the flash. All the camera does, in effect, is "flip a switch"; it shorts out the centre pin of the flash and the contacts at the side of the flash's foot. The voltage problem comes from the kind of "switch" used to short out those contacts. In (most) modern cameras, that ...



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