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3

There's a tiny switch inside the hotshoe (if I remember correctly, on the side below one of the "rails"). If this switch is stuck the camera will think an external flash is mounted.


1

Because light tends to come from above us. You need proper diffusion to make it work well, but light coming from slightly above tends to look the most natural. This is also why strobes are setup slightly above eye level in studio environments as well. If the flash came from below, then it would cast odd shadows from the cheeks and nose and eye sockets, ...


1

Check the custom option "Release While Charging". Check the batteries (camera and/or flash) If the option is not checked, you will not be able to take a picture until the flash is ready. The flash can take some times to charge if the batteries are not fully recharged (both for the internal flash and the external flash). Check the manual at pages 81, 150 ...


0

I think it depends on whether you're shooting in a controlled environment (like a studio setup) or "in the wild". TTL flash, especially the old kind which reads light bouncing from the film rather than the modern version which uses a preflash, can be very fast and accurate — as actually can the older "auto thyristor"¹ models. But, it's also going to be ...


1

Focus on an eye. Exposure: all of them! This is a staged event and a must-have shot. Figure out the general idea using a digital camera where you can see the result right away. Then start with those settings on the good camera. Shoot bursts of 3 on each shot, so you have 3 identical pictures with tiny differences in people's faces, to choose from. ...


0

Where should the focus on the group be? A good rule of thumb is that you get 2/3s of your depth of field behind the focal point, and 1/3 in front of it - so pick the extreme points you want in focus (probably the middle of the front row of people and the ends of the back row of people, unless you want the Christmas tree in focus) and focus 1/3 of the ...


1

Yes, flash usages and aperture are independent of each other. I shoot weddings and 90-95% of my flash usage is with wide open or near wide open apertures. What is confusing you is specifically the case of shooting outdoors where you want the flash to fill in with power equivalent to daylight. In that situation, the shorter your shutter speed, the less ...


0

I have seen a similar problem. I have a 565EXII and Canon 70D. On-camera, exposures are correct. Off-camera, with Sc (Canon Slave) mode, the usual result is gross overexposure. (> 3 stops). I haven't used another flash in optical EXIF slave mode to know whether the problem is with the flash or the camera. I have done a lot of tests, and observed the ...


7

I'd say that it's common enough, since low-depth-of-field portraits are fashionable. However, you have to distinguish between two situations: in a studio or other controlled situation where flash is the primary light, vs. outdoors where you are trying to overpower the sun. As the questions you've linked suggest, the studio situation is easy, but if you ...


0

If you want really cheap, all the Yongnuo flashes with names that end in EX can be used as a CLS slave with i-TTL, although I believe only the YN-586EX can do FP/HSS and not all the models come in Nikon versions. Yongnuo will put gold lettering on the Nikon versions of the flash, silver letter on the Canon version. And yes, even the Canon versions can be ...


2

Since you asked this question, Nikon has come out with the SB-500, which I have and I love it. Works with CLS, so you already have a trigger. It's very compact and also has a 3-LED video light, which is fairly unique and could come in very handy for video or other uses.


4

I'd suggest lighting her with a flash that would mimic the way the ambient light looks. My idea - put a full/half CTO gel on the flash so it has the same color as the lights, use a softbox/umbrella (preferably a small softbox with a grid as it's quite focused) and place it on that side of her face that is lit by the christmass lights. You can now limit the ...


4

Whenever you add light you change the way your image will look. I could think of two things: You could try backlight. Some kind of halo effect, possibly placing a light behind her, this may allow you to lower your iso and maintain "some" contrast, but I cannot really say how far you can go You could try (possibly with a softbox or an umbrella if you have ...


1

Logically, if you're lowering the sensitivity of the sensor, you must increase the amount of light hitting it. I guess you can't switch to faster lens else you would have already done so and you've said it's impractical to take a longer exposure. On the other side of the equation, you can increase the ambient light or the brightness of the fairy lights if ...


1

Now Pentax has 2 WR flashes both of the new 360 and 540 fgz versions (II) are weather sealed. But i did use my Sigma 610 DG Super in some rainy weather and i really have no fear to do it again. (Cover the hotshoe with playdoh.)


1

The first question to ask yourself is what kind of triggering system do you plan to use? CLS All the Yongnuo flashes with "EX" in their name can be used as a CLS slave. Dumb optical (S1/S2/SU-4) If you want to use dumb optical triggering, then all the current Yongnuo flashes have S1 and S2 "dumb" optical slave modes in them. manual radio triggers If ...


0

There are two different wireless systems used by Yongnuo (and other brands) to control (as opposed to simply firing) off-camera flash: Optical The on camera flash uses very short pulses of light to communicate with the receivers on the off camera flashes. Nikon's CLS and Canon's e-TTL system prior to the 600EX-RT use this system. Radio The on camera ...


1

Well it depends on how you wish for them to work in the first place. If you use your on camera flash to trigger them, then they will all work. If you use your existing flash with a cable, then you can use any additional ones as slaves, they will all work. If you use your existing flash on your camera, then this can work the same as the above. If you are ...


0

I don't think this flash is compatible with your camera in auto mode — forum posts seem to confirm this, and this blog post goes into greater detail. In short, you can use it as a manual flash, either at full power or at ¼ power (with the "Lo" button), but can't get further automation (or wireless optical control). The flash has a guide number of 35 meters ...


0

The 600EX-RT doesn't have a built-in dumb optical slave, it only understands the Canon wireless communication systems (optical and radio), which the Fuji doesn't speak. However, you could stick a dumb optical slave (such as the green-based Sonia optical triggers) on the PC port of the 600EX-RT, and trigger the flash manual-fashion if the Fuji's pop-up flash ...


1

You can buy cheap flash triggers that will trigger a flashgun via a PC cable or hotshoe adaptor. They just look for a flash of light, then trigger the connected flash. May be enough for you if you're using the Speedlite in manual mode and the Fuji is only generating one flash (any pre-flashes for red-eye reduction, or ettl metering would need to be disabled) ...


0

Doubtful. Canon's flash system uses a special set of pulses to communicate flash power information and sync details to the flashes in the system. It is unlikely that your Fuji camera implements support for this protocol and without that support, you can't remotely fire the 600EX-RT. There are other third party speedlights and strobes that you can get ...


0

As always, there is no "best setting" in photography - if there were, camera makers wouldn't need to give you all the different ways of changing things. That said, you should be able to change the shutter speed. Assuming you're in a mode where that's generally possible (either shutter priority or manual), changing the shutter speed with a flash attached ...


0

I've discovered that all six of my YN-622C work only intermittently with either of two Alien Bee 800 units, but work fairly reliably with an AB-1600 and 100% reliably with Flashpoint heads. Upon investigation, I've learned that the Flashpoint heads supply 6.0 volts on the trigger pin. The AB-1600 heads supplied 4.72 volts but the AB-800 heads each only had ...



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