Paris

by Jon

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0

What is your sync speed? Try shooting at 1/200th of a second or less. I suspect that the flash doesn't support high speed sync, so effectively your flash will fire but won't be synced with your shutter resulting in a dark image.


0

It is most likely simply not bright enough for you settings. LED lights are much dimmer than a strobe, so you have to account for that when taking your picture. Try to increase your aperture and/or lower your shutter speed and/or raise your ISO. All of these will allow more light to reach the sensor. Of course, you haven't posted your settings, so this ...


3

The "Red Eye Reduction" flash setting causes several bright flashes before the photo is taken, with the intention of closing the pupils of people in the photo, reducing the chance of reflection from their retina, which causes the red eye problem. When there is nobody looking at that flash, that effect doesn't happen. It won't hurt the photo, but it wastes ...


2

My guess is that the studio lights overpowered the speedlight to the point it was barely contributing to the lighting. Next time turn off all the studio lights, place the speedlight with the gel, take test photos and adjust the camera settings until you get the effect you want (or maybe just a bit darker then you want), then turn on the studio lights and ...


0

No, the pop-up flash on your camera has to fire to be a wireless master for the off-camera 430EXII. The camera body and the flash communicate with light pulses ("pre-flashes"), so there will always be some firing of visible light pulses from the master. You can set the pop-up flash not to contribute light to the image. But light pulses are needed to set ...


0

One thing I did while doing some off-camera flash work before I had the radio transcievers was to use optical triggering, but with a very low flash power relative to the flash power of the output units. It could possibly be a little unreliable, but optical triggering tends to be unreliable anyway, hence the recommendations for radio triggering systems. ...


0

I don't have the 60D, but I had a T4i which also has a built in flash like the 60D. Yes, you are able to use the built-in flash to trigger an off-camera flash while NOT having the built-in flash contribute to the scene. You need to look in the camera flash settings - not the off-camera flash unit. There is a setting there where you can choose to have the ...


2

The 430EXII supports Canon's now older method of remote flash triggering, which uses flash pulses from the commanding unit to trigger the remote unit (430EX in this case). The newer system, based on radio, is supported by the 600EX-RT, and ST-E3-RT units. Your system uses flash pulses, which fire BEFORE the shutter opens. So, even though you are seeing the ...


1

Since you are letting the ambient light blow out the background, your flash doesn't come into play. I would start by adjusting my settings to get the ambient light the way you want first, no flash at all. Larger aperture and slower shutter speed will accomplish this, as long as you keep it fast enough to get a sharp portrait in the end. Once this is done, ...


1

Why make such a choice? To state the obvious, photography is about light. Even natural light can make bad photographs. Would you say, you will never use moonlight to take a photograph? Flash is just another source of light. Of course, one must learn to use a flash because, it is a little more challenging than natural light, because natural light is always ...


0

Flash is great, i love it. Endless possibilities. It's not just for dark environments either. I don't consider there to be 'natural light' and 'flash photography'. it's just photography. "Flash is unnatural, i only use natural light" Rough translation;- "I have no idea how to balance ambient and flash light but i'm very good at putting others down who ...



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