Not Your Everyday Banana

by Bart Arondson

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10

Editing out the eyes removes a metric tonne of information that might have been helpful in answering your question — please don't do that if you're asking about studio lighting problems — but there is still something to be seen in the photos you have posted. Apart from the makeup and post-processing that have already been mentioned in the comments, it's ...


5

Unfortunately, your flashes won't be able to do the job. It's not that the DLites are altogether useless (they're really rather nice units), but the way they work — the way a lot of studio flashes work, and not just at the lower end — means that the flash duration at t 0.1 (the time when at the flash is firing at more than 10% intensity) is as short as it's ...


4

At 1/250, you are trying to exceed the x-sync speed of the 6D (which is 1/180, as you have found), which explains the black bar. Don't forget that on the 450D, as a crop-sensor camera, the shutter has less distance to travel, so doesn't need to move as fast to give the same exposure time, which explains why some full frame cameras have a slower x-sync speed ...


4

There isn't nearly as much to figure out as you seem to think. Let's say that you have a scene in front of you that is nicely illuminated and doesn't really need flash at all, and you meter for, and set a manual exposure for, an ambient exposure that would have been absolutely perfect. Then, for some inexplicable reason, you decide to add manual flash ...


3

Bad news: the botzilla table of sync voltages reports that the sync voltage of the 260T is 220V. The Fuji X hotshoe, as far as is known, has a limit of 50V. Hopefully the flash simply doesn't work, and you haven't fried your Fuji X's hotshoe. If you have to use this flash, I'd suggest getting a Wein SafeSync. It would probably be better to get a modern ...


2

Yes, the Canon 430EX II is fully compatible with the Canon EOS 6D and should be able to do all of the functions for which it is designed. If you are having problems using your 430EX II with your EOS 6D, here are a few things you should check: Batteries Be sure the batteries for both the flash and the camera are properly charged. Connection Be sure the ...


2

For multi-flash TTL setups, the photographer first puts the flashes in groups and then adjusts the power between those groups by setting up power ratios. (Say for example that Group A should have 4 times the power of Group B, or a 4:1 ratio.) Prior to the pre-flash, the master flash communicates these ratios and the overall power level to be used to the ...


2

I would suggest Canon Speedlite 320EX. It is relative cheap and matches price class of your camera body. It is also less powerful than 600EX, but in studio it does not matter so much. If you need powerful flash anyway, then Metz offers a wide choice for far less prices than Canon, but be advised that build quality is considerably lower as well.


2

It only requires two values to figure out. Before the pre-flash it knows how much light is ambient. For the pre-flash it knows how much light the scene gets from the flash at a fixed power. It knows how much more or less light is needed for a standard exposure and simply sets the flash power accordingly since it knows exactly how effective the flash is ...


2

The metering flash is almost always relatively low powered. The camera compares the amount of light the metering flash produced to the amount of the pre-flash light that is reflected back to the camera by the subject. It then computes what percentage of light was returned from the metering flash, assumes the same proportion of light will be returned at any ...


1

Get a smaller, lighter external flash unit. They come in more than one size and you should be able to find one that fits your needs. As an added bonus, it will still probably work better than your original built in flash.


1

I just took a few test shots with YN-622C triggers and my YN-568EX (I usually use them in M, so hadn't thought to test eTTL function), and with the single speedlight, if I had wireless and groups on, I was getting consistent underexposure. If I turned wireless off, eTTL exposure was spot-on. I did NOT get inconsistent exposure or missed fires. I also tested ...


1

While the specifics are somewhat brand-dependent, this question has essentially been answered already in one of your follow-up questions. Start with the following assumptions: There is no magic involved; everything that happens will be as simple as it possibly can be and still work; The system is not and cannot be foolproof; any sufficiently advanced fool ...


1

There are a few new systems appearing on the horizon that look like they will allow power control from any iso-compatible hotshoe, including those of mirrorless cameras like mft and Fuji X. But they're typically flash-and-trigger combination specific and are likely to be manual-flash-only on mirrorless. AFAIK, there are no full-function-TTL-capable radio ...



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