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India Point Park
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15

I just read that a normal flash illuminates a scene within a 1/250th of a second. (A flash would keep the scene illuminated for a 1/250th of a second, right? In general, that's wrong. Flash duration is flash duration and sync speed is sync speed. Apples and oranges. The 1/250th of a second is the sync speed of (many) cameras. That's basically the ...


7

Like any lighting, this is not a simple one-size-fits-all type of deal. You have to think it through. Light should very much feel organic in the image and should have a reason for being there (i.e., "motivated light"). Nothing is more jarring than a light source in an image that your brain tells you just shouldn't be there. So think what light sources in ...


7

You need to disable exposure simulation. The EOS M doesn't have a menu option for this but it is disabled with an ETTL flash or ETTL trigger in the hotshoe. (actually any Canon "dedicated" flash will also communicate with the camera and disable Exp Sim) You could also install Magic Lantern as it includes a menu option to disable Exp Sim.


5

I just read that a normal flash illuminates a scene within a 1/250th of a second. (A flash would keep the scene illuminated for a 1/250th of a second, right? Sort of, depending on the specifics of the flash unit and the power setting. For example, a Canon 580EX Speedlite set to full power discharges over 1/250s according to Andy Gock's Actual Measured ...


5

So, can I use a non-Nikon flash or not? Your Nikon will trigger many 3rd party flashes, but with varying degrees of sophistication. From a physical standpoint, you can mount many 3rd party flashes on your camera, and the camera will be able to make the flash fire, but the flash may or may not be able to understand other instructions from the camera that ...


3

A sync cable is a sync cable. If your camera has a PC port that your cable fits and your flash has a PC port that your cable fits then the camera should be able to fire the flash. Of course you will need to control the flash power manually when using a PC connection. If the flash in question doesn't allow for that it probably doesn't have a generic PC port. ...


3

Is there any advantage to the trigger setup over an all-flash setup? price: The E3-RT costs somewhat less than the 600EX-RT as it's basically the same device without the flash tube, electronics (big capacitors and such) that make the flash tube fire, and half the housing. size and weight: While you're shooting, it's nice to have a smaller, lighter ...


3

The only real difference between using the dedicated transmitter and another speedlight is whether or not you want on-axis light to come from the on-hotshoe unit. In a studio setup, for example, not a lot of shooters want to use an on-camera light, but simply want to trigger the lights they've already set up. On-axis light can be problematic for typical ...


3

On any iso-compatible flash or camera hotshoe, the sync signal--the one that fires the flash in sync with the shutter opening on the camera--is communicated by the pin in the center of the "square" of the hotshoe/foot. So, to fire a flash correctly, you can use any ISO-compatible flash. It just has to have that square layout, use the rails as ground, and ...


3

This is a known bug with Yongnuo flashes (notably the YN-685's predecessors, the YN-568EX and YN-568EX II). TTL tends to be inaccurate and will underexpose unless you switch the metering mode from Evaluative to Average (see: this DPReview discussion, where one person claims Yongnuo support themselves suggested switching to Average metering). This is, ...


2

The external power port bypasses the flash's internal DC-DC inverter. External power supplies have their own DC-DC inverter to create the flash voltage. So to say that the external port requires more than 6 V is an understatement. The external port requires upwards of 300 V. I would not recommend trying to use a non-photography-specific DC-DC boost ...


2

My guess is that the ring light you saw on that TV show was just being used as a prop and the actor "photographer" had no idea what a ring light is used for. Yes, it is reasonable to use a ring flash or ring light for non-Macro photography. It is a realistic thing to see from a Pro but only in some situations. Many Pro's use ring lights for fashion ...


2

There is no way to completely turn off the light from the popup flash "Master" as the slave flash is only triggered by optical light. There is no radio transmitter or receiver. Even when set to OFF the popup flash will still emit visible light in order to communicate with the slave. The amount of light emitted will be very low and should not be noticeable ...


2

As much as I want to mention the Jarvie window technique, I have to concede that basically it is macro shooting; fisheye lens, very close distance to subject (a foot or less from the lens). It's just a distorted or effect portrait, but it has lots of the normal macro characteristics. Other than the Jarvie window technique, I've seen several professional ...


1

I wanted to know if I can use one yn600 on camera as Master to control another 3 flashes to fire together.. Is it possible ?? Yes. It's not only possible, it's exactly how the system is meant to work. The only thing you need to consider is whether you'll ever need that master flash to function as on-camera flash, or if you're only going to use it to ...


1

The question seems to make an incorrect assumption: that at a sync speed of 1/250 second the entire sensor is uncovered at the same time for 1/250 second. This is not the case. Most of that time is consumed by the first curtain opening and the second curtain closing. There is only a short instant between the transit of the two curtains when the entire sensor ...


1

1/250 is the time that it typically takes for a mechanical shutter curtain to travel from one end position to another. So for any faster shutter speeds, the closing curtain has to start moving before opening curtain has finished its travel, and 1/250 is the fastest shutter speed where, for just a moment, the whole sensor (or film frame) is exposed at once. ...


1

Your understanding of how a flash works is wrong. The flash duration is more in the range of 1/1000 to 1/8000. Due to physics and the design,the shutter needs to be open longer 1/1000 in order for the flash to "Sync". Flash photography usually involves both ambient light, and light from the flash. Usually we like to use faster shutter speeds to avoid ...


1

No. You can't. The PC sync port on the RF-603 is output-only for receiver mode to connect to the flash, not an input. I know, because I tested it with an optical sensor that worked just fine on my very very old RF-602-TX unit (no longer sold as part of the RF-602 sets--they removed the PC port). If you have an iPhone, the Triggertrap Mobile app, a dongle, ...


1

That's the reason: to shoot a fashon runway performance. This is event photography. This is not a studio. You have models running around, an audience that watches them, etc. One rule of thumb in event photography is: The photographer doing his/her job is not really part of the show. You should not get in the way of what's happening. For normal ...


1

If you are under the same lighting conditions and have the same settings selected when manually pushing the shutter button each time (the flash always fires) as you do when using the self timer (the flash only fires once), then it appears that the limitation of only the first frame firing the flash when using the internal flash (see pages 70 and 148 of the ...


1

With the internal flash? Not with the internal flash. The internal flash will fire only one time in any continuous shutter mode, including self timer. See D7200 manual page 70 and also 144. You can however use a hot shoe flash the way you want, but not the internal flash.


1

There are lots of flash choices for your Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000 Digital Camera. If you want TTL auto flash you must use an Olympus or Panasonic compatible flash that will communicate the settings to your camera. For manual flash you can use almost any brand of flash. Here is a link to B&H Photo showing many different Olympus/Panasonic TTL ...


1

The Yongnuo 560 IV has a 330v external power port but you have only two choices: 6v in the battery compartment or controlled 330v in the external power receptacle. Don't try to build your own external power source to plug into the external power receptacle. Your flash cable and 12v will not work. 330v in the external receptacle alone will also NOT power ...


1

You are on the wrong track here, lacking some basic info. For one thing, the YN560 IV has no port to use a high voltage power supply. Some flashes do, the YN565EX for example. And then 330 V DC is the right ballpark. The flash has regular AA batteries in it, which powers the electronics, and which (for the duration of the recycle) also powers a DC ...


1

One quick suggestion is to bounce the flash (light, not the actual unit) off the ceiling or other large (white) surface to diffuse and spread the light. My other recommendation is to shoot from a lower position so the verticals aren't converging as much. The more you can keep the back of the camera level (i.e. not tilted) the better. See here for more tips.



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