Spring 2012

Spring 2012
by ani

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7

The same is true when the flash is on the camera, facing away from the subject into empty space with nothing to reflect it back to the subject. The point of TTL is to adjust flash power automatically under the assumption that it has an influence on the scene. If the flash is on camera or not is not too relevant. In event photography or photojournalism for ...


3

Don't forget that when using E-TTL you can also apply different power ratios and flash exposure compensation to each group independently. In your example of the hair light you can either change the power ratio of the key light to the hair light. Or if you are only using a single flash you can dial it up or down using FEC. And by selecting the Av exposure ...


2

The basic answer is really that TTL flash isn't all that important in many situations, and that most of the situations where off-camera flash might be used fall into that camp. If you're in a place where the light doesn't change much, any exposure automation is not a big deal, let alone flash automation. It's handy for the first exposure of the session, and ...


2

Assuming "indoors" means flash, the usual reason for a shadow on right side of the subject is that you are holding your camera turned up on end in portrait orientation. This puts your flash on the left side of the lens, causing a visible shadow outline behind the subject on (your) right side. This is the purpose for flash brackets, to let the flash rotate ...


2

When indoors the light meter sensor determines that the ambient light is insufficient. The camera logic orders the flash to fire. The flash thus supplies the additional light needed. In most cases, if the camera is close to the subject, the light from the flash provides the main light for the scene. Now miniature cameras sport a flash that is quite close as ...


2

At high shutter speeds, the closing shutter curtain chases the opening curtain across the frame, so the shutter is never 100% open. The flash has a very short duration and this means that while the flash is lit only part of the frame is visible through the shutter. The exact shutter speed that you'll start to see this issue, depends on the model of camera - ...


2

Both Nikon and Canon use ISO-compatible flash hotshoes on their cameras and feet on their flashes, so the Canon flash will fit on the Nikon hotshoe, its sync voltages are well within the limits a Nikon hotshoe can sustain, and the ground signal (rails) and sync (fire signal--the pin in the center of the foot's square) will be recognized and work, so the ...


2

Is what he said correct, and why? No. What he told you is utter horse hockey. Light travels in straight lines; regardless of its color, no background can "attract light away" from a subject. There are a number of explanations for what happened given what you've told us. Some possibilities: CVS guy didn't allow enough time between shots for the flash to ...


2

1) If the flash is falling on both the subject (in this case: you) and the background, 2) If the subject is sufficiently close enough to the background that there's not a lot of light falloff between the subject and the background, and 3) If the background is more reflective than the subject then using a camera set to an automatic exposure mode could ...


2

No, you can't. The ST-E2 is like a headless 550EX--it doesn't grok/speak the commands from the camera menu. You'd need a 580EXII or later hotshoe unit as master to have that kind of control. If you don't have the cash to spring for the RT flash system or you want a small optical master, your best bet is probably to ditch the ST-E2, and get a 90EX instead. ...


1

The subject of your question is flash synchronization. A little background information will help you understand. Your camera sports a “focal plane” shutter design. This mechanism uses a curtain, not unlike a window shade to cover the entire image sensor chip. Thus its normal state is closed and since it is opaque, it prevents light from the lens from ...


1

Despite your photographic "evidence" to the contrary, the flash is probably faster than the shutter; however, the synchronization between the two is not timed optimally for faster shutter speeds. You don't have much choice modifying the settings to better synchronize the two. You'll have to leave the shutter open for the flash to occur before you close the ...


1

The Cobra Auto 210 is reported to have a very high flash trigger voltage. As you can see from Can using an old flash damage a new DSLR?, this is not safe. Earlier Canon DSLRs could only handle 6V — yours should be able to handle up to 250V, but it's possible the Cobra flash exceeded that. (Also, there is some lack of clarity on whether 250V is okay through ...


1

Godox has several lines of flashes (everything from speed lights to studio strobes) that are manual with HSS. The challenge is HSS requires the trigger interface with the cameras proprietary flash protocols and so if you're doing all that you might as well do TTL. Godox gets around this by making HSS an off-camera only function. So the flash has a single ...



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