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by Jakub

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5

There are two types of battery packs that you can get: The first type is your readily available manufacturer packs. These are specific to flashes, as different flash manufacturers use different high voltage power sockets. (To keep you locked into the ecosystem and make you spend more money). The two most common type of plugs are Nikon and Canons three pin ...


4

The options I'm thinking of must have some characteristics. Portable. Easy assembly. Must be atached to the speedlight (does not matter if the speedlight is on the camera or not) Can be holded by the photographer with one hand. (off-camera light) Decent size, so it provides a decent difussion. Wall/Ceiling independent. :o) I have not tested this but ...


4

We have a couple of existing questions that might help, here. First, take a look at When and how to use a push-on flash diffuser? regarding the plastic. The key is that these aren't really meant to be diffusers themselves, since they are so small. Instead, they provide a bare-bulb effect, and if you are in a room with a low white ceiling and walls, the ...


4

When presented with this situation I've usually hired a VAL (Voice Activated Lightstand.) VAL's are a self-propelling vocally directed support system, they come with built-in collision avoidance systems and fit well into most cars. They are also compatible with most types of light (within certain weight limits) and with the monopod boom suggestion ...


3

I think you're confused as to what constitutes "a TTL system". Triggers merely relay the information from the camera to the flash. Whether you're using an AirRemote or a PocketWizard, if you're using Nikon's iTTL system, then you're getting iTTL information and calculations--it's still the same "TTL system" and the same exposure calculation is happening in ...


3

Since "TTL" (system) in your original question is really about "thru the lens" the software the system uses to transmit that information really has no bearing on the exposure value (fstop shutter ISO ) calculation. What language the hardware talks is not changing the message. If the camera wants f8, and you ask a PW you get f8...if you ask another TTL ...


3

I think the answer is a "maybe". You're talking about different hardware running different software. There will be many occasions where the different combinations of hardware and software will reach the same conclusion and give you the same result, but there are times where there's a more borderline condition that will yield a different result. But, I have ...


3

Higher end studio flashes tend to be (in order from most to least amount of impact on a typical studio shoot): More powerful. They can output more light than their speedlight/speedlite couterparts. Capable of higher quality light. The light they output is more evenly distributed along the visible spectrum in the way natural light is and even at different ...


2

The flashes I like are the famous LumoPro LP180 flashes, so if I put them in Slave mode can they keep up with highspeed sync of my SB-910s? AFAIK the LP180 doesn't have any form of high speed sync, so no.


2

I read that my Canon Speedlite 430EXII could only be used as a slave on my new 5D Mark 3 and that I should buy a new flash. That's simply wrong. Any Canon EX-series speedlight (and many third party flashes) will work just fine with your 5Dmk3 provided you use them on camera, or off camera with the right cable. Your 430EXII is a great flash -- it's ...


2

THe 430EXII works fine with the 5D3 on-camera. All the features are supported, including controlling the flash settings through the camera menu (as opposed to on the flash directly, which is also supported). The "slave" element you are referring to is as follows: when you want to use several flashes, one on the camera and one or more off-camera, the flash ...


2

Check that the diffusion panel is fully seated back into its slot. Like the Canon flashes the YN-568EXII is imitating, if the diffusion panel is pulled out, the flash sets itself to the widest zoom and ignores any attempts to set the zoom differently.


2

The duration of the flash is much shorter than any of the shutter speeds you are using, so the shutter speed doesn't directly affect the amount of light from the flash that winds up in the scene. What does seem to be happening here is that the camera is treating the flash as fill light and automatically adjusting the flash power to balance with the amount of ...


1

Yes, the "guide line" you seek is called Guide Number. It applies to direct flash, and Manual flash mode. Your flash user manual probably contains a Guide Number chart. For example if at some flash head zoom value, and ISO 100, maybe the Guide Number is say GN 100. It might be feet or meters, GN in feet is simply 3.28 times GN in meters (3.28 feet in a ...


1

Is there any pictures I can see shot with two different flashes in equal settings to compare the result? Yes! Prompted by your question, I tried testing two different flashes: a cheap one and a pricy one, so find out if the light itself is any different. My experiment is detailed on my blog post. To summarize: The spectra is different, but it shouldn't ...


1

I don't think there is a way in the flash of doing that, but as a DIY fix, how about putting some putty, or a sticky pad or something just below the 4 directional buttons, to help prevent stray head/hands/trees etc from hitting the buttons by accident. Edit: Just as an example, I had an old remote some time ago where the button wasn't depressed into the ...


1

I see you've received good answers and have already purchased the equipment, but for all the other folks, here is my general (and flash specific) advice. As with almost any piece of gear you might want to purchase or try, it really comes down to: "Is there something that I want to do, that I can't do with the gear that I already have have?" And here I'm ...


1

You can put the flash on a tall monopod, and then use one hand on the camera, and one hand on the flash, like this guy: https://idigitaldarwin.wordpress.com/2012/05/20/aggressive-gear-pt2/, If you find it too heavy, Use a tripod for the camera and two hands on the flash.


1

That fstoppers Flash disc Rafael posted looks pretty neat. Another alternative might be a flash bender. If you don't mind carrying a bit more kit for a bigger light, you could go with a monopod + umbrella holder + umbrella softbox. Quite a bit smaller and lighter when packed up than a proper light stand and softbox. Though still a lot larger and heavier ...


1

If you're actually going to go to the trouble of bringing off-camera lighting gear/triggers with you, then maybe a small softbox could be useful in some situations, but you do need to understand its limitations and limited usefulness, and I'd say don't go any smaller than 8". I use a cheap knockoff of the Lastolite Ezybox Speed-Lite (22cm). But what might ...


1

According to Nikon, the D5200 can sync up to 1/200 s., so the 1/60 shutter speed certainly should not be an issue. Check the following: What is the flash synchronization mode used in the photo? There are settings for Normal, Rear [curtain] etc. Try different modes to see if one is problematic. Does the flash fully extend? If there is something in the way, ...


1

Probably your shutter speed is faster than the flash can work at, take your shutter down to 180/sec and try again


1

If you need to remotely control the power of the 320EX, then you have two choices: Canon's near-infrared wireless system, which would require that you get a 550EX, 580EX, 580EXII, 600EX-RT or ST-E2 to put on the 6D's hotshoe; or you get TTL-capable radio triggers that allow for remote power control through the 6D's hotshoe (e.g., Yongnuo YN-622C triggers). ...



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