Before the rush

Before the rush
by evan-pak

Submit your Photo
Hall of Fame

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Hot answers tagged

29

Your camera will have anticipated the extra light provided from the flash, and adjusted the exposure to compensate. Because this extra light has been blocked out. The exposure is now wrong. Additionally, when the flash fires, your camera is likely to use a different white balance setting to accommodate the difference between the flash light and the other ...


17

It stands for "Prontor-Compur connection": "Prontor" has its origins in the Italian word "pronto", meaning ready (and was a leaf shutter made by Alfred Gauthier). "Compur" is derived from the word "compound" (the "Compound" was a long-lived series of leaf shutters made by Friedrich Deckel).


6

Sounds like you want the outside of the tunnel to be properly exposed and not blown out. Meter for that and with your camera set to full manual mode use the settings suggested by the light meter. Take some test shots to fine tune the exposure. You are limited with an on camera flash but try adjusting the power of the flash with the flash compensation ...


6

(Some people might hang me for this but) You could take two shots and photoshop/merge them together afterwards. To do this you would have to take two shots from the exact same spot, maybe use a tripod. Take the first shot with the right settings to get your desired exposure for the outisde bit of the tunnel. For the second shot with the model use either ...


6

Is E-TTL Universal? No, it's the opposite of universal. It is proprietary and specific to Canon. Each brand has their own specific flash/camera communication system. The only thing that's universal is the sync (fire) signal [which is a short between ground (rails) and the center contact of the hotshoe], because that's part of the ISO standards for flash ...


5

No. E-TTL is a proprietary part of Canon's EOS flash system. Some third parties (e.g. Metz, Sigma, Yongnuo) have reverse engineered it, but to my knowledge it is not licensed to anyone else. Most of the third-party flashes are of the hotshoe type, but a few (again e.g. Yongnuo) offer AC-powered studio strobes as well. It looks like Profoto is included in ...


4

First step: Practice macro without the ring and get used to the extension tubes. Second step: Your camera will not be aware there is a flash fired, so it does not calculate this into the exposure settings. You have a couple of options (and probably more): You need to correct the metering manually, either by using the camera in manual mode (M) and do it ...


3

Put a gel filter over your flash. Golden or orange (especially the CTO) will be best. These filters are available from various manufacturers and holders are also available,if you desire one. There is a product from Rosco that includes variety of pre-cut filters for this purpose that includes various effect colors, but also balancing ones. It is called The ...


3

Assuming the flash is normally automatic TTL mode, so that its light is metered to take care of itself. Then TTL is metered so that the TTL flash power level is adjusted to provide a correct flash exposure. We don't know which camera we are discussing (brand, and a compact or DSLR, etc?), but speaking of camera more sophisticated than the minimum, then ...


2

You can set Exposure Compensation directly on the speedlight. Second button from the left. Note that any EC set on camera is in addition to any EC set on the speedlight. Camera +1, speedlight -1 result is 0 EC.


2

As everyone else is saying, better than nothing, so not completely useless, but in no way to be confused with a proper large softbox. You'll still be better off taking the flash off-camera rather than leaving it on-camera. You will still get an edge to your shadows. And there will be a hotspot. But if used in close, it can be worthwhile. I use a cheap eBay ...


2

Settings: D3200, Sigma 70mm Macro. YN560 III & YN560 IV, triggered by the 560-TX. F13, 1/200s and ISO100. I am guessing 1/32 on both units. It depends on what/how you're shooting. But I think you're being wildly optimistic on how much light your $70 flashes can put out if you're shooting portraits. Although, if you were going for a black ...


2

Light from a flash (or any point source lamp) falls off rapidly with distance. If we double the distance between subject and flash, the light playing on the subject decreases to ΒΌ its original value. Thus nobody can answer your question without knowing the distances involve and whether one or two flashes are to be used. If two, what distances etc. Guide ...


2

Not always. I think the C/N notation is as much of a seller convention to avoid returns :) as a Yongnuo production one. Or, it could be because Yongnuo typically reverse-engineers some bit of Canon gear, so the Canon version is released long before a Nikon version is. So for a long period of time, there may only be the single Canon version (e.g., the YN-...


2

The Canon Version of the YN685 was announced in the Summer of 2015 and began shipping in September of 2015. The Nikon version of the YN685 was not announced until March 23, 2016 and didn't hit the streets until May 2016. That may have something to do with the Canon version not having a "C" in the name as listed at most online retailers. The official model ...


2

Do you want the short answer or the long one? Some viable options or the best one? The long one. I am worried here. There are toooooo many basic points on the question. So I am preparing a check list of points you must further investigate. I will just write a basic tip on each point. No bokeh: What aperture gives bokeh and which not? Do not use a wide ...


2

I see that a complete set should include a key, a fill, a hair and a background light. What a complete set includes is very subjective and depends a lot on the desired look. Given that this is your first set, I would shy away from buying that many units. Start with one or two and add them as necessary. You didn't buy the "complete" set of lenses for your ...


1

Flash exposure is different than the "three components of continuous ambient'. Flash exposure is Not affected by shutter speed, but a more huge difference, flash exposure is greatly affected by the distance between flash and subject (flash and local lights fall off fast with distance, but sunlight does not, not here on Earth). The Yongnuo 560 III manual ...


1

No. You can't control YN-560IVs with an SB-700 the same way an SB-700 can control another SB-700 using Nikon's Creative Lighting System (CLS). Only the Yongnuo flashes with EX in the name have this capability. CLS is a proprietary optical (light pulse based) signaling protocol that requires a CLS receiver in remote flashes. The YN-560 series of Yongnuo ...


1

The essence of your problem is the high differential in brightness between the subject and the background. And you are forcing yourself to use a tight aperture to get the depth of field you want. Using a higher focal length lens and backing farther away from the subject will help with depth of field, but I know of only three solutions to the light ...


1

If you don't want bokeh, the first step is to find the aperture your lens produces sharp results for the model and the landscape in the distance. Something between 8 and 11 might be OK. Depending on the light situation inside the tunnel you probably won't need full power output of your flash or none at all. This is something that really depends on the ...


1

The option C is: That guy does not have a clue of what he is doing. The first explanation is just a cheap excuse. The second one is plain dumb. flash can make objects look darker against a white background. The lack of control is the one that causes objects look darker. When you fire an automatic flash, it fires a small pre-flash, this is a flash ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible