Incense

by Bart Arondson

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

Yes. Canon also has a near-infrared proprietary optical system for wireless flash. It doesn't have a snazzy marketing name like CLS, but is often referred to as "Canon wireless eTTL" or "Canon optical slaving". Like CLS, it can communicate most of the full hotshoe protocol, such as eTTL-II and high-speed sync (HSS). It also allows for control of the remote ...


5

This is wrong; you are right. The sensor can't tell which part of the exposure goes "on top" of the other. You don't have to take my word for it, either; here's a quote from the Flash basics guide on Scantips: Some people imagine that the delayed result of rear curtain sync causes a sharp stopped image superimposed on top of the blurred image (so is ...


2

For camera menu control, you need to have a flash that has that feature in it. All of the flashes with that feature have all five of the pins on the foot to correspond to Canon's five hotshoe contacts so that the flash can electronically communicate with the camera (however, five pins is no guarantee of menu-command capability--e.g., even Canon's own 580EX ...


2

Yes the Canon version is called E-TTL flash and you have similar functions as provided with the Nikon CLS system. You will need to use the appropriate compatible Speedlite flashes (Canon and 3rd party models exist). If your camera is an EOS 600D, EOS 650D, EOS 700D, EOS 60D, EOS 70D, EOS 7D or EOS 7D Mark II the built-in / pop-up flash can be set to ...


1

The center pin will fire the flash on any camera. To be safe use a High Voltage Sync Regulator. Here is a link to one on B+H: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/245292-REG/Wein_W990560_Safe_Sync_Hot_Shoe_to.html This is the first one I found and I'm sure they're are other brands that will work just as well. I used to have one a few years ago, but where ...


1

One attaches to and sends the signal from your camera. It is what we call the controller or transmitter. The other receives that signal and is attached to the flash and is called the receiver or trigger. Transceivers are able to do both functions: they can act as a transmitter when attached to the camera or as a receiver when attached to the flash. Also ...


1

It depends on your definition of "work" and which Yongnuo triggers. If you are thinking of the "manual" triggers (RF-602, RF-603, RF-603II, RF-605), then yes, they will work, but all they can do is trigger the flash with correct timing. You won't have any of the other features that are probably why you're paying extra for a TTL-capable Metz flash. If you ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible