Butterfly

by Rodrigo

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4

I think this is pretty well covered on the second page of Strobist 101: here's what your flash absolutely has to have: The ability to work in manual mode, and to do so at different power settings. (I.e., full power, ½ power, ¼ power, etc.) [...] If your flash has that, skip buying another flash for right now until you have a chance to play with the gear ...


4

The Cowboy studio trigger is a manual-only trigger. If you turn the transmitter over and look at the foot it only has a single pin--this is the "sync" or "fire!" signal pin, and is compatible across all brands of cameras/flashes (except for the older Sony gear that uses the proprietary Minolta hotshoe). However. The menu communication with a flash is done ...


4

All you need to do is time the shot correctly. The closer to sunset you shoot the lower the intensity of the sunlight compared to the light from the open sky. You can see in the image you posted you can see the position of the sun that is very low to the horizon. This was shot just before sunset with no reflectors or other light sources: The shot linked ...


3

Your camera doesn't have to "know" that the flash should fire when you're using a "dumb" (no TTL) flash; the hot shoe's centre-pin firing circuit is closed (turned on) when the shutter is open regardless of whether a flash is attached or not. All of the more complicated communications that happen for iTTL or manual CLS control happens through the other pins, ...


3

Gear-wise, the list is pretty simple. You need a flash and a way to trigger it remotely and a way to control the power output of the flash. This typically means a flash with manual power control and cheap radio triggers of some kind. This will then be followed by a need to position the flash where/how you want it and some type of diffuser, which leads to a ...


3

What to look for? It really doesn't matter, as long as it has a manual mode. I'd get 2-3 Yongnuo flash units and some decent accessories such as transmitters, triggers, stands, reflectors, umbrellas, etc. as well for that budget. But if you can find just about any manual flash a friend or family member has lying around; it can certainly keep you busy ...


2

I've had the same problem recently with my Canon flash not budging when I tried to slip it off the hot-shoe of my Canon 40D body. I'm afraid I did use a lot of force to get it off...but I think it's still OK. And I think I've figured out the problem. After reading the answers here, I took the ring-flash and...while staring at the bottom plate...began ...


2

By playing around with my D5100, I found that if you shoot in PROGRAM (P) Mode, not AUTO mode, and pop the flash up, it will (under normal conditions) leave your ISO where you set it (like, say, 200). It sets the exposure time at 1/60 and the aperture at f5.3. You have to set the white balance manually, though. I actually find the color balance is most ...


2

If you have the YN565EX version for Nikon, the SL mode allows it to receive signals from a Nikon Master flash using the automated iTTL flash exposure system. S1 & S2 modes are for manually set flash levels. If you have the Canon version, SL mode similarly enables the YN565EX to work as a receiver with Canon's e-TTL automatic flash exposure system. Both ...


2

On page 214 of the Canon 6D manual under Shooting Movies> Shooting Still Photos you will find: Even if an external Speedlite is used, it will not fire. If you want full control of image parameters, you will have to switch out of movie mode and into standard still photo mode first. That is how Canon has designed the system.


1

The fact that the place is dark should not matter, although it could just help if the flash is controlling an optical slave. Here are some reasons an external flash can randomly missfire: Hotshoe bug (external flash on camera) Check the connection between the camera body and the external flash, screw it tighter. Shoot a photo; if is still doesn't flash, ...



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