Moonlight

by Jakub

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

If they're TTL-capable flashes, they're brand specific. And they only come in Canon and Nikon flavors. The manual-only models are not brand-specific and will work on any ISO-compatible hotshoe. It's not a 100% reliable guide (e.g., the YN-500EX is an exception), but generally any model that ends in a 0 is manual-only and brand-agnostic; any model that ...


3

Given that everything's on manual, that you're firing the flash at full power (1/1), and that you think waiting one second between shots is sufficient, I'm going to take an educated guess and say that your problem is that you're not waiting for the flash to fully recycle before you take a shot and/or you've got the power level on the flash set too high. It ...


3

Taking polaroids at wedding receptions is nice. There are some things that you should be aware of: There's no polaroid film available any more. You can get modern film from the impossible project, but it does not develop as quickly as the original polaroid film. Waiting a long time for a polaroid image kind of defeats the point of using that technology. ...


2

In a wedding, with on-camera flash, bouncing off the ceiling, walking around taking pics of people dancing, etc. Does a TTL flash have advantages, and if so, what? The main advantage is speed. Given that event shooting is mostly about anticipating moments at the event, and the nature of events being that you usually only get one chance at capturing ...


2

If you're purchasing a new manual hotshoe flash that you will, presumably, be using off-camera Strobist-style, I'd look at and for the following features: Power The guide number is (sometimes) a good guide for this, but make sure you know the ISO setting and zoom settings that were used to measure the guide number. For some third party units (e.g., ...


2

You are using TTL, which means all flashes have to communicate with the camera and there has to be a preflash to determine the flash output. The process is something like this: preflash: let every flash fire at a certain power level meter the exposure during preflash and calculate if they should have more or les power during the actual exposure actual ...


2

You could use a fill light from a reflector or another strobe to illuminate the background a bit. Of course, that means additional setup time and expense. You could experiment with extending exposure, at least on the Canon, to reduce the brightness of the ring-light in comparison to the background (e.g. increase exposure time so that light keeps entering ...


1

Flash (manual or TTL) exposure varies with subject distance (and ISO and aperture too, but also subject distance). Twice the distance is exposure two stops down. So as you walk around the room shooting pictures, or you are chasing kids running around, then many cases are surely DIFFERENT situations, different distances, etc. With manual flash, you have to ...


1

Which flash helps? and in what areas does it help? I'm sure you're familiar with the difference between automatic exposure modes (e.g. Program) and manual mode on your camera. The difference between TTL and manual flash is similar. With TTL, the camera measures the exposure from the flash and the scene and adjusts the flash power to create a reasonable ...


1

I'm a little confused by your question. Wireless 2nd-curtain sync is not possible with Canon OEM gear; but is possible with Yongnuo flashes and radio triggers with a Canon body. If you use Yongnuo TTL/HSS-capable flashes and triggers, then you can do wireless 2nd-curtain sync. If you use Canon's RT or optical slaving gear, you can't.


1

I've done a few booths so far, with a fixed lighting system and some on-camera flashs, and I havent had it even once where the fixed lighting was actually used. The scenery of these images change so often that you should not worry about it, from single pictures to 6+ groups you will see everything and as the day passes (and probably the more booze is ...


1

Sure, some sort of "proper" lighting setup will give you better results than on camera flash... but as your friend is wanting photos of people with funny accessories on a polaroid camera, I suspect that he's not after your traditional formal portraits. Keep it simple, go with the on-camera flash and concentrate on getting fun images which capture the guests ...


1

The black bar you are seeing is the curtain from your shutter. Your shutter speed (1/500) is faster than your camera's flash sync speed (1/200). To get rid of the black bars, you either need to enable "high speed sync" on your flash (if it has the feature), or choose a shutter speed of 1/200 or slower.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible