Paris

by Jon

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

36

When I started considering the purchase of a fisheye lens I was worried that I wouldn't use too often. Boy, was I wrong. I loved it so much that it actually gave me motivation to take more pictures and it grew to be my favorite lens. Unfortunately I had to sell it when I switched to a full frame camera and now I miss it a lot. First of all let's start by ...


20

When you correct the distortion in an image from a fisheye lens, you get undesirable side-effects. You lose a lot of LOT of diagonal angle of view from cropping, to get a rectangular image out of it. See the below example of a rectilinear conversion (yellow indicates the largest usable rectangular area after fisheye to rectilinear conversion). So after ...


18

You lose a ton of resolution when you essentially crop a small portion of your image. Also because of the curvature of the image retained resolution will not be even across the image, which can wreak havoc with apparent sharpness in a print (or even just a web image). Lastly it's a lot of post processing work you'd have to do for every image you care ...


11

The original link is actually my article and lens. I shaved the petals off the lens because I didn't want them to show up in the full frame camera images. Although I already have the 16mm fisheye, the 10mm shaved is a totally different look and although you don't get a full circle, it's better than spending more money for a new lens. I wasn't concerned ...


11

The zoom helps with crop sensors but that's not the main reason. Basically on a full frame sensor the 8-15 is two lenses in one, at 8mm it's a full fisheye with a circular image and a 180 degree vertical field of view. At 15mm it's a diagonal  fisheye, with 180 degrees corner to corner and no black areas. Even if you don't want to shoot circular ...


10

Those two lenses are going to give you significantly different results. The big thing to note is that the fisheye lens is, well, a fisheye. It'll create severely distorted images that can be "straightened" using software but it's going to have a distinct fisheye look. It doesn't look bad, but it's not what one would usually choose for a ...


9

It's probably worthwhile for experimenting, but it likely won't give you the same quality or experience as a regular fisheye lens. One option if you're looking to minimize cost while you experiment is to rent a lens... most larger cities have at least one camera shop that does rentals and there are also online rental outfits such as LensRentals.com or ...


9

All lenses create a circular image, it's just that most of them have an image circle large enough that it covers the entire sensor. Vignetting at wide apertures is a manifestation of the image circle encroaching on the corners of the sensor as the circle edge is not as sharp as it would be with a narrower aperture. With a fish-eye lens, the image circle is ...


8

A camera lens is made up of a number of individual glass elements (lenses) which work together to focus an image onto the plane of a piece of film or a digital sensor. Each element in the 'stack' of a lens is either there specifically to make the image hitting that sensor more accurate, or to correct for some inherent deficiency that has been introduced as a ...


8

Fisheye lens can be used to pack together some kind of action with environment, and don't mind the distortion (examples: 1, 2). I've also seen some nice portraits done with fisheye, but that really depends on what you can come up with. Or, you can get rid of the distortion by software conversion and use your fisheye an normal rectilinear ultra-wide lens. ...


8

First, who said Fisheye lenses are cheaper than wides? Currently the old EF 15mm fisheye is sold for ~$650. The EF-S 10-22mm is slightly more than $700 now. You get all the advantages that @Mike listed from the UW, plus a zoom range. The EF 8-15mm Fisheye was just announced and I can't even find a price quote, but given it is an L lens, expect price ...


8

For an image like that, a "fisheye" lens was used. This is a specialized lens that covers an extreme wide angle. What can a fisheye lens be useful for?


7

The Fisheye is a lens for special effects. You certainly don't want to buy this as a lens for documenting your vacation.


7

They are useful for those times when you absolutely want the subject to know you are taking a picture, unlike a telephoto where you can shoot anonymously. ;-) Seriously, fisheyes have a number of real applications: They allow coverage of large fields of view, with a distortion that has a fairly simple mathematical model. They were invented for ...


7

Adding an additional piece of glass to an already complex arrangement of elements is, at the very basic level, something that can degrade the performance of the lens. Adding one that is designed to optically alter the lens raises even greater risk, this is, after all, not explicitly designed to work with the lens. On that basis, you're already in the optical ...


6

Um... yes. You're comparing a cheap (a quick Google search shows around $35) aftermarket attachment to a dedicated lens from a major manufacturer. Lenses are very often "you get what you pay for" but you're not even talking about the same category of glass here. Any fisheye lens from Canon/Sigma is going to give you vastly better results.


6

Back when I was a photographer at parties, I used my Tokina 10-17 fisheye ZOOM lens quite effectively to pack a bunch of people together with some scenery and a bit of a creative touch. The fisheye zoom had the advantage that you could make the effect bigger or smaller, depending on the occasion. I'm including some examples:


6

By default, you are unable to place filters in front of those ultra-wide angle or fisheye lenses. There are however, 3rd party accessories designed to tackle just this issue: Fotodiox Pro. Filter Adapter (145mm) Lucroit Hitech Filter Systems


6

I've had limited use of a Composer and Muse. The build quality was acceptable, and I know they've held up well for the owners who use them regularly, though it's a pretty clear step below kit lenses in terms of fit and finish. I think the amount of enjoyment you get out of a Lensbaby is most directly correlated to the optic you choose and your expectation ...


6

I have not used Fulla myself but pulled this information together from various internet resources. First you need to install Fulla, which is included in the Hugin package. sudo apt-get install hugin-tools Fulla is able to read in correction data from the last open-source PTLens database, available here. You have to point Fulla to the PTLens database ...


5

If you buy a fish-eye you will use it, I promise! I got mine just over a year ago, and contrary to popular opinion, I have not grown tired of sticking my (Nikon 10.5mm DX fisheye) lens 3cm from my subject, but still capturing the whole atmosphere of the scene! I love mine so much: really really would recommend getting a 'proper' one!


5

You really can't use filters with these due to the wide angle of view. You could try to rig up something along the lines of a Cokin style filter, but it would have to be a very large filter to avoid vignetting. Some lenses, like 400mm and 600mm Nikon teles, have a "drop-in" filter which you slot into a gap in the middle of the lens. Not sure if any ...


5

As far as free alternatives you can try Fred's defisheye script for ImageMagick, or Fulla, which is a command line tool that comes with Hugin. Fisheye-Hemi is superior to these, though, as instead of using a standard remapping to a rectilinear projection that softens the edges and requires an aggressive crop it uses a custom mapping algorithm that preserves ...


5

Apparently Nikon currently only offers a 16mm fisheye for the FX cameras. I suppose "gaining" 5.5mm and "saving" $150 by modifying the DX is more than enough justification for some people.


5

You could use the majority of software that handles barrel distortion, and just either setup a profile and save/reuse that profile, or reuse the settings by syncing the settings. An example of this software would be PTLens, but many solutions exist. Since this is a fixed focal length lens, you don't need to worry about changing the settings for each image - ...


5

The difference between a wide angle fisheye lens and a wide angle rectilinear lens is equal area projection versus straight line projection. Uncorrected, they will both demonstrate field curvature. All simple lenses will demonstrate field curvature based on the angle of view the lens provides. Of course the sensor/film size is also involved in the angle of ...


5

There are several problems transforming the curvilinear perspective of the wide angle GoPro lens to a rectilinear one. The transformation stretches the image in certain areas and compresses it in others. This lowers the image quality as new pixels are created as approximations and interpolations from the information in the original image. There is also a ...


4

A few thoughts that come to mind: the distortion in fisheyes is probably more difficult to correct due to the extreme distortion present; they may be more susceptible to flare (wider lenses usuallly are more susceptible than more telephoto ones); the optics may be generally of lower quality than ultra wides; the front element will bulge out further so ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible