Serene Life

by garik

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17

You can get rid of most of it in Lightroom/Camera Raw. Move the blacks/shadows sliders to the left. The fireworks are so bright they'll be at the other end of the histogram and largely unaffected. You could do this with levels or curves. At that point, your sky will be very black, so you can paint/mask out remaining smoke pretty easily It's possible ...


14

In addition to the tripod I use a remote to trigger exposures around 8 second. Or you could set it to 'bulb' (or the equivalent on your camera) and click to open and close the shutter manually with the remote, so you can capture the action you desire. I've shot fireworks at 200 ISO, no need to go higher, in my experience. In fact I stop down the aperture to ...


14

Take a tripod and experiment! Different displays will suit different settings. Is it going to be mainly rockets, or will there be roman candles? Is the scenery worth capturing? And etc. From experience you're going to want a tripod as your exposures won't be in the handheld range. I would also err toward very long exposures and shoot often — you're more ...


11

As most other answers suggest using long exposure times, I'd like to add that this is very dependent on the number and intensity of the fireworks themselves. During bigger fireworks shows, long times like 4 seconds of exposure (even with a small aperture) would probably be too much and render too long trails. Here is one example taken on New Year's Eve ...


10

It looks like the photographer has changed the aperture during the exposure, using a manual lens. The lens starts wide open when the firework first explodes and is then quickly stopped down. I guess it just takes a lot of practice snapping with one hand and twisting the aperture ring with the other. A lens that offers a continually variable aperture (like ...


9

I can't claim any deep expertise, but I made some fireworks photos this past summer and the "formula for next time" I came up with was: Tripod Wide angle (i.e., crop afterwards) f/9.5 ISO 200 Bulb mode The advice I read was to chimp a lot, which I agree with. One thing to keep in mind is that only a small percentage of the frame will be bright (i.e., ...


8

Fireworks require a long exposure. In this case, the photographer shifted focus while the camera was capturing the fireworks. For this reason, the shape has points from the time the image was in focus it widens as the image was pulled out of focus. It is easiest to start with the image in focus and then defocus as time passes, rather than the other way ...


6

There is a semi-famous trick known as the black hat trick. What you do is set your camera to take a long exposure, and put a black hat over the camera while you are waiting for the fireworks to burst. Then right before the fireworks burst, take the hat off. It should greatly reduce the amount of smoke you see in your images, and not show the rocket blasting ...


4

The only technique I can recommend with certainty is experimentation! There are no hard and fast rules. Bulb mode is useful if you want to go past your camera's maximum exposure time, typically 30 seconds. If you don't have any foreground light sources, i.e. you're pointing at the sky, or the foreground is unlit, then you can pretty much expose as long as ...


4

I asked this question apparently too soon, because only a day later the photographer himself answered this question on the Colossal blog here: Unusual Long Exposure Firework Photographs by David Johnson The way that he achieved this is outlined in an email correspondence found in the above link and quoted here: The technique I used was a simple refocus ...


3

This is done by changing the focus during exposure. Set the camera to take a shot of around 1 second. Start out of focus, and refocus quickly near the end of the firework burst.


3

Try increasing the Clarity slider (LR4) This should go someway to minimising the the smoke by increasing midtone contrast. You may still wish to increase overall contrast slightly using the black and white sliders in Lighteoom4. I would use these sparingly as a little goes a long way depending on the effect you are after.


3

If you are already quite familiar with your camera then I can suggest the following link: http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/fireworks.htm I have found with experience that manually focusing is the best way to ensure that you get the fireworks in focus. If you have the time try focusing manually on the firework display at the begining once it starts. (i.e the ...


3

Use a tripod - Good fireworks photos require long exposures, and the best way to get them is to use a sturdy tripod. Find a great location early - Once the show gets going, you’re not going to have the time (and if you’re in a crowd, the ability) to move around much. Turn your flash off - Whether it’s an on-camera flash or an add-on, it’s not nearly ...


3

I was shooting fireworks a few weeks ago, and I used manual, because setting the speed and aperture have quite different effects in this case. (I.e. the automatic setting, which assumes that both control the brightness/exposure of the final result, simply does not work.) Fireworks are essentially moving particles of light. The speed (exposure time) you ...


3

This was an answer to Akram's very similar but not identical question. Alas, he deleted iut while I was preparing the answer, so, here it is here. I believe that shooting fireworks is close to shooting the moon, a very bright subject in a very dark sky. There are very major differences between Moon and Fireworks photos. Provided that a tripod is ...


2

creativeLIVE have a fireworks workshop video which you can watch for online free or pay to download for later. There's an hour-long "class" and a 15-minute demonstration. If you plan on shooting fireworks tomorrow or on the 4th (or any other time), watch the video!


2

A lot of good advice here already - when I did my shots i did the following: Tripod Set up bulb ISO of 200 Autofocus off - and focused manually on infinity App 16 I did have the wrong lens - would recommend a wide angle I also found that if the fireworks were mainly white I needed only a short exposure of a few seconds With multiple colours I had ...


2

I have yet to do it myself, but the New York Institute of Photography has a detailed article on the subject that is worth a read. Actually, the site in general is worth a read. :)


2

I don't know if this is too obvious, however I'd simply suggest not shooting them from behind (or even from the side). Try to get on a building or something. (I haven't tried it myself, but logically thinking, that should avoid the smoke getting in your way as much as possible)


2

Ah, okay. This is way more clear than your other phrasing of this same question. The issue is that the graphics formats supported by browsers do not enable fancy layer-compositing like this. GIF files have a very simple one-color-is-clear transparency, and the PNG format allows you to specify an alpha channel, which is a simple degree-of-transparency ...


2

No metering mode applies here. If you are shooting Bulb, the camera has no idea how long you will keep the shutter open, so it simply does not meter. You can also do it in manual (M) mode in which case the meter operates (to show you the offset from ideal exposure) but does not matter either. These fireworks shots were all done in Manual mode. Metering ...


2

Bulb mode is recommended in situations in which you don't know the exact time of the firework's existence.. Also the use of a black sheet or T-shirt is to get the effect of the ND filter(to accomplish long shutters) Some Common tips for Firework photography are as follows: Set Slow shutter speed(slow enough to get the whole fireworks effect) Set small ...


2

The photo that you present as an example has a shallow depth of field given by the large aperture used to capture it. It also can be given by a moderately large aperture used in combination with a long focal length lens. This is a photography website, so above are the details on the photographic part of the image. You can also achieve a similar but not ...


2

I borrowed your image to try it in Image View plus more 3, which I made myself so I know all the underlying algorithms. I think this is pretty close, albeit the colours may be a bit different (my weakness as I am colour deficient). What I did was: Local contrast enhancement. Adobe calls this "clarity". It is similar to the unsharp mask with a very ...


1

Here is the general technique. You can't make a single image re-size, but you can have several images. The main background image set to clip to the div it is in. Then you have an image on each side you want to fade out. Each of these are a gradient from background to transparent. I've attached an example to make it more clear. When the div is re-sized, the ...


1

In Photoshop you could also add a layer behind, either of a gradient, from a sample section of the sky, from another photo, or by blurring the main picture, and then manually mask (not sure if that's the right term) away the smoke. Alternatively add a blank layer in front and use the clone stamp (or similar) to apply sections of sky over the smoke. Rather ...


1

Being after the 4th I realize this answer might be coming little late, but after finishing my first time photographing fireworks I thought putting an answer in here would help. Tripod & Support. Good support means clear images. Granted I was standing on a beach, so keeping the amount of movement around the tripod while the camera was exposing to a ...


1

Without a doubt: shoot manual There's two things that are guaranteed to cause metering problems: shooting at night (low light levels don't give the meter enough information to go on). rapidly changing light levels (such as fireworks going off)


1

The obvious tip is to check the weather report and plan to get a spot upwind. Having smoke behind the fireworks is much better than blocking the view (it's also not fun when ash starts to blow in your face, eyes, lens). If there is no wind, you'll want to be ready when the first few fireworks go off. Have the camera set on all manual settings, a few stops ...



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