I Dare You!

by peter_budo

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

A couple of useful resources on this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5pUBtZr5MYk https://alexkunz.wordpress.com/2015/01/18/underexposure-salvaged/ I use the Vari-ND style filter but I know photographers who go the other route. Either works, with practice. What you need to decide is how useful the color enhancement is. My view is that there are times it's ...


0

Just to add - UV light doesn't damage a lens (as suggested by the OP), whether it's a mirror lens or not. UV light just has the potential to affect the image. A UV filter attempts to filter out UV light, so it doesn't matter where the filter is positioned, as long as the light going through the lens also goes through the filter. There are many different ...


1

You need to have at least one filter (there's usually a plain glass "filter" in the kit; the 1A is probably playing that role in your lens's kit), since that element is part of the lens design. Because you can't adjust the aperture of a mirror (catadioptric) lens, the only means you have of changing the amount of light coming through the lens is to use a ...


2

The second two filters you have listed are not UV filters but neutral density filters. They are used to reduce the amount of light reaching the sensor by a set number of stops, to allow for use of slower shutter speeds than would otherwise be possible. The names ND2X and ND4X stand for 'Neutral Density 2x' and 'Neutral Density 4x' - indicating that they will ...


0

I think the photo has 3 "effects" Vignetting. Some adjustments on contrast (curves). A slight color grading. Probably some saturation adjustments. I think it is a trend to give and "old look", or "film look", washed out, lost memories, etc. With a "trend" is one of many: dragan, tone mapping, "hdr", black and white, grainy, high contrast... Yeap, ...


3

You can indeed photograph an eclipse through an ND filter. I actually photographed a partial solar eclipse with an f/22 setting and a HiTech 10-stop filter, producing the following result: It's no Lunt Solar scope image of an ultra narrow band Ha emission, by any means. It does show surface detail, plenty of sunspots and sunspot structure, and some other ...


4

A "big stopper" reduces light by a factor of 1000x, whereas Baader Astro filter film reduces light by a factor of 100,000x. You may get away with using the big stopper if you're using live view on a dSLR but I'd seriously recommend avoiding viewing through the finder. If you fried your sensor that would be bad, but not as bad as burning a retina. Stacking ...


0

Just got of the phone with Wex, I asked them the same question and their answer was "we would not recommend it because the sun requires a filter in the region of 100,000 stops.Yep that's what I thought, 100,000 stops, might as well stick a brick in front of your lens. I've just looked directly at the sun through my Lee big stopper and I feel sure that with a ...


2

The application/apparatus described in the question is similar the method used by the Microsoft Kinect(tm) camera system. Kinect employs a timed IR dot pattern projected from the device and a high speed IR camera to pick up where each dot lands. A processor uses simple trigonometry to create a depth map which can then be applied to the RGB image from ...


4

There is no infrared wavelength that does not appear in sunlight. You would have to apply a filter to the sunlight, and to any ambient incandescent lighting, to be able to restrict the image to whatever is illuminated by your specific IR source. Note also that most consumer digital cameras have infrared filters in front of the sensor. However they still ...


0

A high-priced neutral-density filter will have optical-grade glass in a metal frame, with a multi-layer anti-reflective coating. At the cheap end, you'll have a plastic filter in a plastic frame, with no anti-reflective coating. In between, you'll have various combinations of the above, plus variations such as cheap glass or single-layer AR coatings.


1

It looks like this filter uses a high black level and adds a yellow cast. One way to see this is by starting with the instagram version and looking at what it takes to make it look "normal". Here is my normalized version of the instagram version: I used the darkest area as the black level, which was (.161, .125, 090) in the original. I then use a white ...


0

Your version has more contrast than the instagram filter. Try reducing overall contrast to get closer, then reduce the highlights and/or increase the shadows if necessary. Once you've done this you may need to reduce overall brightness to compensate for the increase in the shadows. You may also want to decrease overall saturation a tad. The instagram result ...


2

Price differences between ND filters are often attributed to differences in quality, as with most other consumer products. Pricier ND filters tend to have glass optics while their cheaper counterparts would use plastic instead. Glass would more often that not give you images with fewer aberrations as compared to plastic due to the nature of the material, ...


0

It depends... What is your final intended use for your images? If you're just going to share them on the web, then the quality of the filter is less important. If you're going to blow them up to mural size and paste them on your wall (or a billboard), then quality really matters. That said, I would recommend going for the best filter you can possibly ...


-1

You are most likely looking for "Cross-Processing." You can find many plug-ins that should replicate the effect. You can also grab a freebie that should do what you want from "Perfect Effects".


1

There is a limit to the amount of length you can add to the lens barrel before it starts blocking the light that enters the lens. The determining factors are the angle of view and how far back the front element is from the filter threads. The current version of your lens has a front element that's more recessed than its predecessor, so that factor gives ...


7

You have a light smudge or a very minor abrasion on the surface of your lens, running at 90 degrees to the direction of the highlight smearing you are seeing. It probably won't be visible on the lens unless you get the angle of the light just right. If it's a smudge, a good cleaning (with a good cleaner - use tissues or fabric designed for the purpose and a ...


1

I'm not familiar with using developed color film for IR; however, I have used a project where the inside of a 3.5" floppy disk was used. It should be noted that was used with a webcam and not a "proper" camera. If you want to develop a cheapo way is with coffee and orange juice, but it takes away the color so it probably won't work for your project. ...


2

I don't know about colour negative film but unexposed slide film works once developed. Slide film needs to be transparent to IR by necessity, otherwise it could be damaged by the heat from a projector bulb. There's no guarantee your film will work and unless you can develop colour film yourself, a cheap IR filter from an auction site may work out cheaper ...


1

I've had attachments that slip-fit over a smooth outside cylinder. Especially in a compact camera, the base of the lens is a plain cylinder that is wider than the extended lens. I saw some dyi ringflash plans that used a split piece of pvc pipe, where the original pipe was a bit smaller than the lens barrel to slip over. Opened to fit around the lens, it ...


2

I literally just hold up the filter to the lens and take the picture. I'm too cheap to buy multiple sets of filters for both my DSLR and compact cameras, so I buy one larger set for the DSLR lenses and use that all the way around. I've done the same thing with my smartphone and my DSLR filters too.


0

To be honest, the advantages of using a polarizing filter at night are limited. The vast majority of people who purchase a polarizing filter are using it to darken the sky for landscape photographs. Others may also use it to remove reflections in glass or water (or general glare from photographs). It will only decrease the "wet look" or have no impact at ...


1

What the prior comment called threads are just concentric circles to hold the lens cap not a filter. They are not really threads which match real threads required for 52mm filters. If you use a 52mm filter, such as a UV to protect the front lens, it will not screw on properly. It can be forced on but the stress on the lens itself while forcing the filter to ...



Top 50 recent answers are included