Lunch atop a (Springfield) skyscraper

Lunch atop a (Springfield) skyscraper
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6

In lighting terms, a gel is a piece of thin, transparent, plasticky material in the color of your choosing. Rosco and LEE are perhaps the best known gel manufacturers, at least in the US. Gels come in large sheets that you cut down to fit your application. One 20"x24" sheet of a given color will probably last a lifetime if you're only using it in your gel ...


4

A gel filter cut to a circle slightly larger than 39mm in diameter is what the holder is designed to hold. There should be a flap that opens up and lets you insert the filter material. You then close the flap back over the filter material to hold it in place.


1

As well as the DSLR plus telephoto lens setup shown in your link, I have also used diffraction gratings mounted in front of (modified) web and video cameras as described. http://www.threehillsobservatory.co.uk/astro/spectra_20.htm Because of the very short focal length of the webcam lens however, the length of the spectrum is very short with a 100 line/mm ...


5

I have used the Xume adapters. Awhile back I standardized on 77mm filters, and also found myself swapping them around all the time. I thought the Xume would be a perfect solution. When I bought them, they did not have a dedicated Xume-compatible lens cap, so I "made my own" with old-school screw-on/off caps and dedicated Xume rings for them. I also put Xume ...


6

Is there a simple way of quickly swapping a circular polariser between lenses (of different filter diameters)? Not really. The simple solution is to have a polarizer for each lens so you don't have to swap them in difficult conditions. The cost-effective solution is to do as you are currently doing and use step down rings. Magnetic filter holders and ...


0

The "trick", if you want to call it that, is: Understanding how many stops each of your filters reduce the light entering your camera. Your ND2 filter allows 1/2 the light falling upon it through so it is a 1 stop filter. Your ND4 filter allows 1/4 the light through so it is a 2 stop filter. Your ND8 filter allows 1/8 the light through so it is a 3 stop ...


3

It all depends on the specific exposure you're trying to make. Generally when you're using an ND filter, it's because you're in a situation where the shutter speed and aperture setting combination you want to use will overexpose the shot. The key is to know how much that combination overexposes the shot, in stops (EV). If you look at the histogram of an ...


1

Neutral Density filters are used to reduce the light so that you can have a larger aperture, or slower (longer) shutter speed, and still have a properly exposed photo. ND2 equals a 1 stop reduction. ND4 equals a 2 stop reduction. ND8 equals a 3 stop reduction. Just use the filters alone or even combined together to get the type of exposure you want. ...


2

It's highly likely that cheap CPs use materials that are less optically clear. The camera uses a smaller area of the lens/filter when zoomed in, therefore magnifying the optical artifacts of the CP, which results in less detail. This, combined with the fact that each lens has a sharpness "sweet spot" at a specific f-stop, and detail is lost to greater ...


3

What is acceptable is a matter of personal prefernce and where the photo will be used. I personally think that the flare is well within the tolerance of being acceptable. When it comes to needing the lens protected in a harsh environment, such as ocean spray or possibility of objects, this protection is crucial. I have seen much worse flaring with cheaper ...


-2

A polarizing filter is likely the most useful accessory you can own. It works by limiting light rays that transverse the lens to just one direction of vibration. We use them to mitigate reflections. Additionally the polarizer acts like a UV filter in that it cuts haze seen in distant landscapes. The polarizer enhances clouds and intensifies sunlit vistas ...


4

The problem is the cheap CPL filter, not CPL filters in general. I have also noticed significant image degradation at longer focal lengths, but only with low quality CPL's. When I use good quality CPL there is no image degradation.


6

Hard to know from your post, but note that a CP filter will loose you between 1 and 2 stops of light, depending on it's setting. This significantly reduces the amount of light reaching both the sensor and the all important autofocus system. If you have a variable aperture lens, this means that longer focal lengths have a smaller maximum aperture and ...


0

You could try a document pocket / protector / bag. Wikipedia says they can be produced of different plastics, mine seems to work perfectly for thermal radiation:


0

Some photographers use various low-budget techniques to get blur effects without having to invest in blurring filters. One of these might work for your situation: You could use nylons or a thin silk scarf over the lens. Some photographers use gauze, but that's a pretty severe blur, and usually only used around the edges of the lens. When it's cold enough ...



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