Lightnings taking a ride

by ceinmart

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1

The only color infra-red film is that of the classic Kodak Ektachrome EIR slide film. The tech sheet for it can still (at this time) be found at Kodak. The following images are from that tech sheet. Kodak discontinued EIR in 2007. This is a rather odd film as one can see in the spectral sensitivity curve: Things that are bright in the infra-red are ...


1

I wouldn't like to sound like capitain obvious, but first of all you have to open your mind to the possibility that 90% of the picture you saw by clicking on that link are post-processed. There is this method called Cross-Processing, which alters the color of your picture and that is nowadays very popular amongst photographers. The pictures you are showing ...


0

The 18-105mm has a filter size of 67mm. So you need a 67mm polarising filter.


0

Another option is, if you're happy with the resolution your DSLR can create videos, is to record the scene for a few seconds (or even a few minutes), and later blur the frames together. Pros of this approach compared to the multiple image one is that you'll have usually much more frames to blur, and the result will be much smoother, the cons is that the ...


7

Just to add a bit of links to the other (good) answers, if you do not want to use a ND filter, you can use multiple exposure and use an averaging method to simulate a long exposure --- basically, 20 exposures at 1/10 of seconds will be more or less equivalent to a 2 seconds exposures, or use a median filter, which can even be better --- in the right ...


2

As mentioned in Oliver's answer, you can use a neutral density filter, this let's through only a small fraction of the light, but it doesn't affect the color. You can then shoot at large aperture and yet have long exposure times. Another solution is to take many pictures and then use image stacking methods. This method can be used under favorable conditions ...


14

Apart from using an ND filter, you might be able to achieve the desired effect by taking multiple photos and then blending them in post processing. Either an automatic blend with "ghost removal" might work, or layering the images and manually masking/unmasking selectively (in effect "painting out" the people). All of this pretty much requires a tripod for ...


25

What you are looking for is a ND (Neutral Density) filter. To illustrate, here is an example of photo taken in daylight in a street with a ND1000 filter. The filter allowed a shutter speed of 6 seconds. With no filter, with the same aperture and ISO, the shutter speed would have been approximately 6/1000 = 0.006 secondes (no "ghosts" effect). Contrary to ...


0

You could try something like this which is used for IR protection. I'm not sure how easy it is to cut cleanly you may have to experiment. Or you could go for a drop in filter (but they are not cheap, here is one for a cool $476.


0

Silverfast has this functionality built in, and has a huge range of negative stocks to choose from to get a perfect conversion back to a positive image. http://www.silverfast.com/highlights/negafix/en.html


1

The only use for a UV filter for digital cameras is to protect the lens, although there are mixed opinions about the usefulness of that. I do use a UV filter for extra protection, also to protect the lens from moisture. The lens then has to be cleaned less often, therefore it will accumulate scratches less fast. Now a few scratches won't affect image ...


8

Simple answer: No, you don't need a UV filter. There is no particular reason to use one... film was quite sensitive to UV light, more so that the eye, so when shooting film a UV filter did something useful. Digital sensors are different in this respect, less sensitive to UV, so a UV filter is irrelevant. All you are doing with a UV filter is to stack up more ...


1

From my experience multi-coatings on lenses, when the IR filter over the sensor is removed, reflects the aperture in the form of white spot(s). On some lenses (Nikkor 35/2.0 which have very pale coatings) I don't have the white spots, and the picture is generally much sharper. On macro and lenses with intensive multi-coatings, I notice that the effect is ...


1

Short answer : yes you can. From your update, your NEX is in "full spectrum" mode : the sensor filter has been removed and a glass equivalent has been added to replace it (description of this operation for a NEX 6 available here : http://www.ir-photo.net/ir_nex6mod.html). As your sensor is natively sensitive to a wide range of frequency, it detects now ...


1

It depends on how the IR-conversion was done. Digital sensors are sensitive to UV and IR frequencies as well as visible light, so camera manufacturers put a UV/IR blocking filter in front of the sensor to avoid having non-visible light contribute to the exposure (it throws off the colors with "normal" photography). IR or UV conversion always involves ...


1

The lower cost filters are made of Aluminium/Aluminum which has a very high thermal expansion coefficient compared to say Brass which the better quality filters and some lens bodies are machined out of. So the male thread of say, an Aluminum Polariser screwed into a brass UV filter or lens body on a cold day will expand when it warms up and hence be much ...



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