Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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0

It looks like a normal image taken with the subject laying down in the sand. It doesn't appear anything special was done at all.


8

Because of the 60Da's modification to increase IR sensitivity for astrophotography, if you plan on using the camera for regular visible-light photography, you probably should get an IR cut filter, otherwise you may experience color shifts when the sensor gathers both visible and non-visible light together (magenta cast with synthetic fabrics, and foliage ...


0

I think you're getting confused between a feature of the camera and something you can modify - your camera has the feature you need. See this: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/explora/canon/announcements/canon-eos-60da-takes-a-astrophotography You probably don't need an IR (infrared) filter (take some shots first and find out, be sure to try it at night and ...


1

Take still images with the correct exposure and look at the settings. Then count the stops down to the 1/50s F1.8. It is simplest if you can achieve the correct exposure at F1.8 with e.g. 1/4000s. Then you just divide the 4000 by 2 every stop until you hit 50. Then you also see how the bokeh will look. It it is still overexposed stop aperture down the amount ...


1

Consider the Sunny 16 Rule. i.e. on a sunny day with Aperture of f/16 and ISO of 100, you need to set shutter speed of 1/100s to get proper exposure. Lets take your case, You need 1/50s shutter speed which is 1 stop from 1/100s You need f/1.8 which is appx 7 1/2 stops from f/16 (f/2,2.8,4,5.6,8,11,16) so you need appx an 8 1/2 stop ND filer (or more since ...


0

It kind of depends on what the lighting conditions are exactly. The usual haunts (incl. eBay) sell cost-effective filter sets with several ND filters (for example 2, 4, 8 stops). Might be worth buying one of those with a diameter matching the kit lens, and an adapter to fit the (larger) filters on your 50mm f/1.8 lens. Then you have several to try out ...


0

I specialise in photographing paintings and most of the above are good suggestions. Definitely start with a white balance for the lighting you are using and for super accurate colours a Q card OR colour checker passport would be essential. BUT all this is out of the window and a complete waste of time unless your monitor is calibrated. The mention of ...


1

Traditionally the technique for photographing prints and paintings is called "cross polarization", where you have polarizing filters on both the lens and the light sources. This helps prevent glare (which washes out detail and color). The setup is a little complicated, but you want two lights set at 45 degree angles from the artwork, and the camera set back ...


2

Filters will definitely help, contrary to the other answers. Let me explain this (and I assume that you shoot in RAW. the only proper way to go.) Let's say you have an average RGB value of (95%, 25%, 10%) through the entire picture. This is basically a heavy red color cast over the image. Now, RED is being digitized using the ~95-100% of the dynamic range ...


2

The problem is most likely white balance. Your camera can't tell the different between a grey painting in red light and a red painting in white light. If it sees a lot of red, it'll probably assume it's in red-ish light and will "correct" away some of the redness. A simple solution is to photograph a piece of white paper or plastic (make sure it really is ...


3

I'd recommend getting a colour swatch such as the X-Rite Color Checker Passport. If you take a photo of your painting with the device in shot, this acts as a reference for all other photos taken with the same lens and lighting conditions, and ensures the colours are as accurate as possible. The device comes with a stand-alone application and a Lightroom ...


9

Probably not. Color filters can be useful when you want to get a certain look in a black and white photograph, but usually don't enhance color. That's because they are inherently restrictive — they subtract colors from the scene. Probably what you need is a) better lighting on the painting and b) to shoot in Raw so you can make careful adjustments to bring ...


3

They probably don't correspond to Wratten numbers at all. The experimentally-derived filter factor for the red filter, for instance, is 2, whereas the filter factor for a #25 is 5, so there's an extra stop and a third of light coming from somewhere, and that somewhere is probably in the shorter wavelengths. The other filters are quite similar. That suggests ...


0

I LOVE this product. It will not damage coatings, I've been using these for years. Be sure to use the right one - there's some for filters and some for lenses. I don't honestly know the difference. The product just works, so I haven't really researched it a lot. https://www.lenspen.com/ For major cleanings I do what's listed in Michael's answer with lens ...


1

It appears that only the European distributor has the SFH-14. You could probably order it from eBay or get it imported, though it would be grey market and not have any warranty. I could not determine if Samyang has any future plans to release it globally or not.



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