Sunset in Kruger

by MrFrench

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2

To keep the sky from blowing out you don't want any old ND filter, you want a graduated ND filter (GND). This is a filter that only darkens part of the scene, in this case the sky. The darker areas beneath the sky are not darkened so that details are still visible. The advantage of square GND filters is that you can adjust them in the holder to match the ...


0

Polarizer will darken the sky and make isolated clouds look more dramatic. It is a good filter to have in general. Use it with moderation, though. It may make the blue sky very dark when shot on a sandy beach in direct sunlight. If you plan to get close to the sea water, grab a UV or "protective" filter as well for protection from salty ocean spray. Get ...


2

Usually at the beach, a polarized filter is helpful, to cut down on unwanted reflections. In clear water it aids in being able to see to the bottom was well. Since you are in bright sunlight, the reduced EV from this filter does not impact your shots much. To reduce washed out sky, you can try a graduated ND filter. If you want 'silky water shots' in ...


0

You may find that some lenses (both DSLR or SLR ones) rotate their front element when focusing. If your DSLR does and your SLR doesn't, it may be a pain to use graduated or polarising filters. More info: http://www.ephotozine.com/forums/topic/filters-and-lenses-that-rotate-the-front-element-27373 Also DSLRs don't need UV filters (maybe except to protect ...


1

YES!!! Definitely! some (polarisers) will work differently but that's just part of the fun. I use red, yellow, orange and blue filters for BW and they work perfectly. Some may argue that this is not necessary as you can filter on colours in post-processing, but postprocessing will definitely diminish the amount of information (bits!) of the image while ...


0

Besides polarization, color filters are the main compatibility problem you are likely to run into between film and digital cameras. While you may not have any color filters for your lenses, watch out for color flash filters. For example, there are some common green gels to match your flash color to fluorescent lights, and orange gels to match incandescent. ...


3

Yes. The only thing you want to look out for is "linear" polarizing filters, which interfere with TTL metering and autofocus. If your old gear doesn't have those features, your polarizing filters might be of the linear type. Newer polarizing filters are of the "circular" type, which doesn't cause problems with modern systems. (Despite the name, "circular ...


8

As Matt noted, there's no general reason that you can't use them if the diameters match up with your lens elements. The only thing I would note in addition to that is that you may run into linear polarizers which may not work correctly with your camera's metering and autofocus systems. That's not really an issue for focussing if you manually focus. For ...


8

Yes, there is no reason that these would not work, assuming that their filter diameter matches your lenses, of course. As with lenses in general, there have been improvements in design and manufacturing which may make newer filters nicer. For example better coatings are available, and older filters are less likely to be multi-coated. You may also find newer ...


4

The other answers are correct: for this lens, the hood attaches to a bayonet on the outside of the lens, and the filter threads are still clear so that screw-in filters can still be added. It should be noted, however that this isn't universally true: screw-in hoods are available, and for some lenses this is/was the OEM solution. Also, some filter options -- ...


0

Yes. The hood dosen't atach to the filter mount. It ataches to an exterior ring. You could atach a pile of 20 filters one on the top of another and the hood will do fine. (of course you shouldn't 20 filters at once)


1

Yes, the filter has the same diameter as the lens so it won't prevent you from mounting the lens hood.


0

tillinberlin comented this is solarization and he is basicly right in some degree, but if you use it on a positive image you get the wrong result: So, you can use a negative image or use the curves the inverse way solarization works. You can see the objetive of this step in the hair. After this you could use a gradient map. That would be a starting ...


0

My guess is that this was originally a scanned colour negative. I can achieve a very similar colour shift and 'surreal' contrast by scanning any colour neg and simply not applying colour correction as you would normally do. The rest of the effect appears (backlighting, harsh contrast) to be 'in camera', so to speak.


0

AFAIK this effect is called Solarisation (or solarization) and it's a phenomenon known already in analogue photography where parts of the image are wholly or partially reversed in tone. You could probably do some further search on the original phenomenon and try to reverse-engeneer it with the help of layers and transparency and the like.. There is also ...


1

I'm using a slide copier attachment on my camera. I copy the negative to camera raw and open in the Photoshop raw image editor. I select the white balance tool and click on one of the brightest parts of the image. (This will be black or nearly black in the final image.) The white balance tool removes the orange cast in the raw negative. I then use the ...



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