Red and Blue

by Gordon

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0

Read this carefully, If you can get some lubricant on the thread (WITHOUT CONTAMINATING THE LENS OR FILTER ) this will definitely work. Using a lens cleaning cloth, and while away from your camera and equipment, spray some furniture polish containing silicone on to the cloth, Then very carefully put your fingernail into a corner of the cloth and wipe around ...


1

I am seeing warm highlights and cool shadows. I opened the image in Photoshop and sampled a few areas that seemed like they were neutral in the original scene (blacks, grays whites). Its hard to be exact because I am only assuming the original color, plus there looks to be a lot of color filtration on the room lights. I sampled the guy in image #4's ...


0

I found that I was having a problem finding this initially due to my lack of full understanding of what the filter would accomplish and some missing terminology. Ultimately I did end up finding a pre-built lens that accomplishes my goals quite well. There are two filters actually that would do the trick. One is a UV pass filter and the other is a UV + IR ...


1

UV-pass filters are commercially available. Just a quick look in Amazon found 52mm UV Black #403 Glass Filter for Type "A" Ultra Violet Transmission and B&H Photo has Rosco Permacolor Glass UV Pass Woods-type Filter - 2" Round. Edmund Optics has pages of glass filters. It will take some work to find one with acceptable transmission in the bands you ...


3

Theatrical photography is one of the settings most prone to ghosting and other types of flare being caused by a flat filter on the front of the lens. You have a few areas of intense light and a lot of dark areas around them. What happens under more typical bright scenes is that the flare produced by the filter is masked by the brightness of the scene. Not so ...


5

If you have to use anything then I would suggest a lens hood. The only reason for that is because of the stage lights coming down and might bounce to cause a flare. Stages, with lighting, are designed to give a certain atmosphere for the performance so any additional changes defeat the purpose of that lighting. Now, depending on your location, you may ...


3

UV filters are generally considered to just be lens protectors, because photo camera sensors usually have UV (and infrared) filters directly on their sensors. There is a drawback to adding any additional glass elements to the lens: ideally they don't introduce any distortion or reflect any visible light; in reality they do. In darker conditions you don't ...


2

I take it that you are using an unmodified camera for your IR images, you need the Hoya R72 filter as you cannot use the lower cutoff filters like a 650 or 680 as these are BVR ( barely visible red ) filters and only capture IR light on modified ( either full spectrum or a 590 ( Hoya 25A) conversion with the filter on the lens cameras. The cheaper 720 nm ...


1

Every bit of glass you place in front of the lens will cause flare. In general, expensive filters cause less flare than cheap ones, and fewer filters cause less flare than more filters. When you think lens flare, you may think of the circles or shapes that appear in frame as reflections of the sun, but lens flare refers to all unwanted light coming from ...


0

The main thing would be to keep them free of dust, dirt, and any sticky substances (eg oils). The dust and other particles (eg metal shavings) are one major cause of these threads sticking, and the oils and stuff will contribute to these particles becoming stuck there. You'll need to do this both for the lens and any filter you're going to screw onto it ...


2

I bought a used Minolta with UV filters on both lenses. One day while shooting, I took it off half way into a roll of 200 speed film. The shots were super sketchy after that, so if you are shooting outside in bright sun with film, I would recommend it. But, that's just what I think — could be different with different film and different cameras.



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