Fresh Dew on a Rose

by adarsha joisa

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2

The first thing to know about fog is that its effect is more pronounced with distance. The best is to get as close as possible. Do not zoom in, get closer instead. Don't fall into the cliff though! Second is that fog reflects light. Do not flash it. Shoot it from an angle where the fog receives the least light from other sources, such as street lamps. ...


2

Step 1: Duplicate layer As we don't want to do any destructive editing, make sure you duplicate your layer (Layer>Duplicate Layer) and rename it. Quick Selection ToolStep 2: Selection If your foreground detail is out of the fog and it's the background you want to clear up you'll need to do a simple selection so the foreground stays as is. The Quick ...


2

I want to corroborate what chuqui said above and add a bit more detail. Fog works like adding white to all pixels, and it reduces both your sharpness and contrast. Any algorithm that tackles one of these two can be helpful to you. The classics are overall contrast, unsharp mask (try a large radius then a small one) and smart sharpen. But there are also more ...


1

This image may actually feature very little Photoshop or post-processing from any computer software at all. It may simply be taken with lights gelled to the appropriate color, and with the lens defocused.


7

Your options are limited; the fog is an opaque item and post processing can only do so much. You can enhance or reduce the impact of the fog by adjusting contrast. It may or may not help much, it may impact other parts of your image. but effectively, the fog is turning the image into a very low contrast image, so increasing contrast can reduce it's impact. ...


1

You can improve the image you capture by upwards of 1% (very nearly 2%) in quality by using a polarizer if there is fog without much overcast, and perhaps by an additional 0.05% using an enhancing filter to cut the excess blue a bit. Anything more than that means shooting in the weather you wished were happening at the time - trying again another day, or ...


1

Besides the obvious Lens Blur it looks like it was overlayed with a Gradient Fill layer using a custom color gradient, or the overlay could have been a layer containing a few coarse color splotches: yellowish on bottom, bluish left, and purplish right.


0

Due to the small chance of birefringence in the ND filter (likely only if the glass is stressed or if made of plastic), the ND should be closer to the camera. This is most likely just a theoretical issue with good quality filters, though you can see color fringing when photographing though plastic windows; see ...


1

I don't think there is anything particularly special going on. It doesn't take multiple captures and HDR to explain the pictures you show. You do need decent sensor dynamic range, but not excessively so for a good modern camera. These picture seem to be taken a bit before dusk. That and the overcast sky accounts for the flat lighting. Since the ...


0

As told in the comments, I think it is an HDR image. HDR uses a set of photo's with different exposure, and blends all the well exposed parts in the image to one image. Therefore, all parts of your image are detailed. On wikihow you can find a nice tutorial on HDR images. This result is being created: With 3 seemingly boring pictures: It is hard to ...


0

Yes of course you can do that. The Lee systems(and the associated competitors) are built this way as it causes no issue. In a related question and answer I displayed how I achieve this same thing: How to mount a circular ND filter in front of the ND graduated filter? Here is an image from that answer:


1

he said that Calumet used to distribute Lee filters in the USA That is correct. Here is from one of my orders from 2013 LE6150 Calumet 4x4 CC50M Resin Filter $74.99 4 $299.96


0

I just happened to have read about that a few days ago. Modern Photoshop Color Workflow by Dan Margules, figure 2.1B. Relevant text: The main problem with Figure 2.1B ... sharpening ... was misused. ...inserted a nasty halo around the long black jacket... Although it is possible that someone who has seen it happen decided to use it for artistic ...


2

Increasing local contrast while reducing overall contrast when working with an image that has very high contrast between adjacent areas will cause such a glow in the lighter areas that are nearest to the darkest areas. Many apps use such a method and can, if applied strongly enough, result in the halo effect. The photo above was processed from a single ...


0

Any app that boosts tonal contrast can do that. Even instagram's own LUX effect can do this if pushed to extreme. On computer the Nik package can easily do this.


-1

The apeture (F stop) is a fraction of the distance from the center of the lens to the film plane while focused on infinity. Therefore, in my opinion, this would not work for that reason.


1

To see wavelenghts that were not recorded, no. A security camera might have an IR channel that is not used in the final image in daylight, and scientific cameras may have different channels than those made specifically to model human vision, with processing to approximate a realistic picture (e.g. Hubble telescope pictures), and using the narrow filters in ...


1

I've seen a tip to use cutouts placed over the lens to give a shaped bocah. I have Cockin "filters" in a set that are the same thing, intended for vigentting. So, the effect you get will vary depending on the size of the cutout, the focal length, and the apeture used. Why not take a series of photos with different apertures and the same cutout and make ...


2

I think what will happen is: incoming light sees a smaller aperture then that will diverge a bit when hitting the lens then that narrower beam hits the internal aperture then that arrives on the sensor. What you will have is: an improved aperture (but not that good as if you did it with the aperture blades) much narrower useable image (wasted sensor ...


-1

I do not think you can do this. The only thing you will get is vignetting. The aperture in lens is located inside. Please check this article for more details



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