Napioa - Wind Origins

Napioa - Wind Origins
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0

You can use Adapter AV15-III or AV15-II for Voigtlander 15mm f4, it fit on Bombo holder name Laser100


2

What is called a "circular polarizer" in photography is just a linear polarizer combined with a quarter wave plate which converts the linear polarized light that comes out of the first part of the filter to circular polarized light. The conversion to circular polarized light makes the light behave the same as unpolarized in the camera thereby preventing the ...


1

No question, the polarizer is the most useful filter in arsenal of the digital photographer. The polarizing screen works because light from the sun as well as many light sources is un-polarized meaning the light waves vibrate in any and all plains. As the light passes through the atmosphere the direction vibration is altered. This vibration orientation is ...


2

You need to understand the situation better, about the purpose of the circular polarizer, about why linear polarizing filters are Not used on sophisticated cameras today. A linear polarizer will work just fine as far as the photo goes. The photo does not care. We used linear filters in the old days (before electronic sensors). But a linear polarizer ...


0

Get a Cokin P-series filter holder. The P-series works with lenses up to 82mm in thread size. You'll need an adapter ring for each thread size with which you plan to use the filter holder. Good adapter rings are available from third party sellers at very affordable prices, so 77mm, 67mm, 58mm, and 52mm adapter rings will allow you to use P-series sized ...


6

Adaptors to reduce the filter thread of a lens are a bad idea. They cause vignetting (dark areas in the corners). You might get away with a reduction of 2mm as different brands standardise on different sizes. Some kit lenses have bigger threads than they need so that the manufacturer needs to support fewer standard sizes. Apart from these 2 cases your not ...


4

Ill throw some advice in there (I also happen to be a pilot) Instrument Lights: Unless you are shooting some kind of piper cub or something chances are the instrument panel is lit its self. Don't be afraid to use the instrument lights during the day to add some fill light. The type of lights vary by aircraft but you may be able to make the instruments ...


3

To get rid of nasty reflections from glass surfaces a really great thing to do is crossing polarizer filters on flash and lens. In practice, you put a polarizer foil (can be found in broken lcd panels for example if you don't want to buy it) on the flash and then turn the polarizer on your lens until the affect is achieved as much as you like it. Watch out, ...


3

I'll use a tripods and take multiple exposures shoots for HDR (natural looking HDR, not the cartoonish kind). Then composed the shoots so all the instruments are clear and in focus, but also thanks to HDR allows the viewer to see though the windows. I'll reduce reflections by using a polarising filter, and being on a tripods the reduction in light doesn't ...


0

Wait for the sun to go down...or at least lower in the sky. You need less light so you can decrease the shutter speed, assuming you've already reduced your ISO and closed down your aperture.


0

Square/rectangular is better. Round is generally cheaper. The biggest advantage of square/rectangular filters is with graduated ND filters. They are usually rectangular and can be slid up or down on the holder to move the line between the darker and lighter sides of the frame. This allows more compositional freedom. With a screw-on graduated Neutral Density ...


0

Landscapes may benefit from the use of neutral density and circular polarising filters. Neutral density filters are used to equally modify the different wavelengths of light. The purpose of these filters is to help the photographer to extend the exposure time. A common use is to freeze a waterfall... The shutter speed may be fast enough to render the ...


0

The square filters are generally of better quality, and have tons of variety, and are more versatile. But since it seems you're just starting out with them, perhaps some easier to use and cheap screw-on filters would be good to start out with. Sets of NDs and even ND graduated filters can be had inexpensively, and produce some darn good results. And are ...


0

Lens cleaning tools are a blower, a microfiber cloth, and lens cleaning fluid. Try to blow up dust off the lens with the blower or canned air. Finger prints can be detached with a circular wipe of the micro fiber cloth.


0

The R72 has a filter factor of 16. Now a filter factor is a multiplier. We use this value by multiplying the exposure time without filter. Thus if the exposure time without filter is 1 second, then 1 x 16 = 16 seconds with the filter mounted. Alternately, the published ISO without filter is divided by the filter factor. If a film is rated at ISO 400 without ...


0

How can I still take those pictures without a grey filter One option is to try to DIY a neutral density filter. You won't get the best quality, of course, but you can get some useful ND-like effect by stretching a piece of Mylar film over your lens and securing it with a rubber band or two. Stretch it tight so that there are no wrinkles. If you need a ...


0

You can limit the amount of light received by moving a black sock, piece of dark cardboard etc. in front of the lens. If you have a 10 second exposure and repeatedly cover the lens for a total of 8 seconds during this time, the net exposure will be 2 seconds, but the blur effect in the image will be something between a 2 second and a 10 second exposure ...


17

You can merge multiple short exposure photos into a single long exposure image. There are a lot of tutorials on the net, for example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nAuQWfS3pLg Basically, he opens the sequence of photos in photoshop as layers in a single picture, then "auto-align layers", "convert to smart object" and "stack mode" - "mean". Image ...


9

Assuming you're doing the obvious - setting ISO to the minimum and using the smallest aperture you can - then there's nothing else you can do without an ND filter. They're not that expensive :-)


2

I suspect metering will not be useful in that situation. The metering responds to visible light, which the filter blocks. The metering does not respond to infrared, which the filter passes. I think you are on trial and error. This article (with some experience) says compensate to about 9 stops down ...


1

Perhaps the proper question is, what is the filter factor for the R72 filter. (how many stops of light does x filter block ) i am sure there is a general filter factor known for the filter but i do not know it. I would shoot the film at its rated ISO ( unless i have tested the film with my development and determined that another ISO gives better results ( ...



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