Mist

by Jakub

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1

A very simple and cheap hack consists in cutting and placing the gel filter behind the lens, that is between the lens and the camera's body. You can see a tutorial here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WjfTFYMPzKs It can be useful to avoid overexposure as seen in the video, or if you are working with an infrared-converted camera, and need to use an orange ...


0

I am looking for a good filter for my 67mm thread lens. I have good experience with the Hoya 8Layer HD cir-pol filter and I really like that it is not as dark as other filters, but it is very expensive and according to reviews it is not as "clean" across the wavelengths and the surface as others like B+W and Heliopan. I did my own quick ...


1

You have two options basically, you can try to repair it yourself or you can go to any camera shop that performs general repairs. If you try to do it yourself I would recommend a tool such as this Camera Lens Vise Tool. Keep in mind that CPLs are multiple pieces of glass and quite fragile. With proper it can likely be repaired, but there is a chance of ...


0

You can't do this - the brightness of light and it's colour cannot be separated, so you cannot filter out colour whilst leaving the intensity. You say you cannot shoot B&W because of the girl & the glowing balloon - I assume you are trying to keep the colour of the balloon? You might have some success with a filter the same colour as the balloon ...


0

There is no way to desaturate an image optically (short of a deep infrared filter that only allows frequencies that the sensor colour filter array is invisible to). Assuming you are shooting digitally, why don't you just turn down the saturation setting on the camera? That doesn't require any post work and counts as doing things "in camera".


1

So, if I'm correct you want to make the moonlight slightly blue, the only way I can think to achieve this is by playing with White Balance. There is no way to "desaturate" with a filter and have the result not heavily colour cast.



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