Spring 2012

Spring 2012
by ani

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Hot answers tagged

61

Yes. It degrades image quality - adding more elements to a lens always reduces image quality; better filters will just do so less. One specific thing that happens is light reflecting between the front element of the lens and the filter, which can be reduced (but not eliminated) with coatings on the filter. It makes it more difficult to use other filters. ...


48

To Summarise This is an attempt to summarise the widely-held opinions of photographers in general. I believe this is a fair distillation of views. Adding any filter risks adding lens flare and reducing sharpness The effect of most filters can be reproduced in post processing The only filter which cannot be adequately reproduced in post is a polarising ...


44

I use polarizer so much that I never take it off of my main lens. The good thing about it that depending on its rotation you can adjust how strongly it affects you picture from maximum to virtually nothing. Let's start with what the polarizer physically does: it reduces (sometimes completely) the glare from non-metallic objects. How does it translate ...


33

There's a difference between color and color correction filters although they both are colored. Color correction filters are useful in digital photography to get more even exposure in all channels under some special types of lightning. For example you'd probably get more exposure and thus less noise in blue channel if you used blue color correction filter ...


33

Do not clean your lens (too much). Cleaning marks are by far the most common source of damage to lenses. Shooting under normal conditions, it takes a large amount of dust and grime to have any effect. The same approach applies to filters; good filters use the same type of glass and coatings as your lens (though perhaps not the same absolute quality). ...


33

It's six. Remember, the stops are already logarithmic. That is, a 3-stop reduction (as from a 3-stop ND filter) is a 2³× loss of light — ¹⁄₈ of the light gets through. A one stop filter halves light, since 2¹ is just 2 (→ ¹⁄₂), and two stop filter is 2² (→ ¹⁄₄ the light). When you stack them together, you're adding the exponents, so 2³ stacked with 2³ is 2⁶ ...


32

I disagree with the sales person; it's two completely different things. Exposure compensation is used for making the image brighter or darker than what automatic exposure in the camera would make it. An ND filter is used for allowing a slower shutter speed without making the image brighter. If you would simply use exposure compensation, you would pretty ...


29

The answer will be easy to figure out if you understand a little bit what polarization means. I don't have a polarizing filter to play with, but I do have a physics degree, so here it goes: Light reflected by certain types of surfaces (such as glass or water, but not metal) is partially linearly polarized. Light reflected under a certain angle is fully ...


28

Your intuition is essentially correct but there are a few important points. When the lens is stopped right down, only light heading for the centre of the front element will make it into the picture, so the whole front element isn't used for every point of light hitting the sensor (though all of it is used for some point of light). Even when the aperture ...


27

A polarizer cuts out light — about one and a half to two stops, give or take. Additionally, one does not always want the effect. In wide angle shots, it can make skies look distinctively uneven. So, it makes sense to not include them by default. B+W and Hoya are good brands. It's worth spending a bit more a well-made one with good coatings.


25

I carry a jar lid gripper around in my kit which has always done the trick for me when I need a little extra, well, grip. The other 'trick' that I have learned over the years is that most people's default reaction to a stuck filter is to get a really good grip on the filter and just try to torque it off. The problem with this approach is that the filter ...


25

What you are looking for is a ND (Neutral Density) filter. To illustrate, here is an example of photo taken in daylight in a street with a ND1000 filter. The filter allowed a shutter speed of 6 seconds. With no filter, with the same aperture and ISO, the shutter speed would have been approximately 6/1000 = 0.006 secondes (no "ghosts" effect). Contrary to ...


23

MRC coating is a good thing to consider if you want your filter to last long enough for your lens. MRC stands for Multi Resistant Coating is something like the weather seal for lenses. Its necessary if you tend to shoot in extreme conditions against mist/dust/water drops etc etc. MRC gives you a few benefits: Cleaning is easier. More resistant to ...


23

I see two options: You can stack ND filters. Sounds like you just need to eke out another stop or four, so your second filter doesn't have to be quite as extreme as the 9-stop filter you already have. By only having two filters, rather than 3, you should be able to reduce the vignetting a bit. It would help if your filters were the slim kind designed for ...


23

Filter Types There are essentially 3 kinds of GND filter: Soft, Hard, and Sunrise/Set. All these come in various 'strengths'. Soft GND filters have a gentle gradient from dark to transparent and so are good for landscapes with irregular horizons such as mountains, hills and to some extent buildings. Hard GND filters have a more sudden change between dark ...


22

Polarizers are often more expensive than ND filters and you need two of them. Stacking two filters can cause vignetting with wide lenses. You have an extra glass surface with two polarizers which can cause flare and potentially loss of contrast/sharpness. This arrangement can cause colour shift toward yellow (but so some ND filters). Extreme wide angle ...


22

A Neutral Density (ND) filter is a filter that reduces the amount of light captured by the camera evenly across the visible spectrum. As such, it looks grey to black (depending on the filtration power) and does not cast color on the received image (like blue or yellow, e.g., filters will do). When using a ND filter, there is a need to compensate for the ...


21

A polarizer works in the way that it will let through only the light that is polarized in the same direction as the filter is currently turned. It is true that many AF systems have problems with this. To solve this, circular polarizer have a layer "inside" the polarizing filter that "re-polarizes" the polarized light in a different way so that the AF can ...


21

As a DSLR user, you actually see through the lens, which is why it is easy to use a circular polarizer. First is to know when to put it on and when not too: It is not advisable to keep it on constantly, although I met people who do that, because it gives you 2 stops less light. This means your camera either uses slower shutter-speeds which makes things ...


21

When light bounces off a relatively nonconductive surface it becomes partially plane polarized, meaning the light tends to have the same polarization direction. Polarizing filters can be used to counteract glare/reflections, by orienting the filter at 90 degrees to the polarized reflection so that it get filtered out. If you orient the filter so that it is ...


20

You can merge multiple short exposure photos into a single long exposure image. There are a lot of tutorials on the net, for example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nAuQWfS3pLg Basically, he opens the sequence of photos in photoshop as layers in a single picture, then "auto-align layers", "convert to smart object" and "stack mode" - "mean". Image ...


19

Wow... Well, there are a lot of filters out there that are used for a whole variety of purposes, but to cover the high points: UV Filters are designed to reduce or eliminate UV rays coming through the lens. At this point, they're primarily used as lens protection, though the utility of that is debatable (I side on the not so useful side of that argument, ...


19

As per other answers, it is usually marked with the ⌀ symbol on the front and, if not, on the barrel. Some specialty lenses do not accept filters, in which case you won't find any markings. For your lens, the thread is 67mm This is the thread size which means you can attach that size of filter directly. This convenient but costly. Instead, I buy my filters ...


19

Firstly, what is a neutral density filter? "Neutral density" just means that the filter is a pure shade of grey: it shouldn't (if well manufactured) add any colour tint to your photographs. There are two main types of neutral density (ND) filters: graduated and non-graduated. Graduated ND filters are darker at one edge and lighter (usually completely clear)...


18

A UV filter cuts out the ultra-violet part of the spectrum (which is almost all filtered out by regular glass any way). Digital camera sensors as well as film are sensitive to near visible UV light which shows up as purple in photographs. This isn't usually a problem as the amount of UV light in most cases is minimal. It can however be a big problem under ...


18

Anytime you add something in the optical path you will lose quality. The quality you will lose depends on the filter quality, filter type and lighting conditions. Most filters are extremely susceptible to flare because they add a flat reflective surface and can take a great image and make it completely unusable. That does not mean you should never use a ...


18

There are two ways to simulate a Graduated ND filter by software and they both have different disadvantages and advantages, compared to an physical filter: H/W Filter Pro: A H/W filer gives you results immediately which you can see while you compose. Con: On the other hand, the effect is fixed in gradation and shape. Software Effect Pro: Adjustable in ...


17

that purple haze is probably a color cast caused by the glass itself; the welders glass often isn't neutral color. you should be looking at solar filters, or very dark (and probably stacked) ND filters. Thousand Oaks sells solar filters, to name one company.


16

Cost of the filter is a very real downside. In case of a consumer-grade lens and a good UV filter, you might find yourself spending something around 1/5 of full replacement cost on "insurance" against dust (hardly affects image quality, removable), dropping and scratches (worse, but happen seldom). If you use the lens in good conditions and/or rarely, you ...



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