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by w.hrybok

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11

It's not just about maximum aperture. Even in two lenses with the same focal length and max aperture, one could have a larger diameter. The larger diameter could be because of using larger lens elements, which could have advantages with regard to sharpness and light falloff at the edges of the image circle. Some lenses may even project a larger image circle ...


10

There are basically two ways to share filters between lenses with different thread sizes. You can buy screw on filters that fit the larger lens and use a step up ring to attach those filters to the smaller lens. You can use a system of filter holders that use adapter rings to attach to lenses with various filter thread sizes. You then use filters, many of ...


8

This looks like a spacer ring, which is used to add space between a lens and a filter (such as close-up filter) or other lens attachment to assist in focusing adjustment or increasing the angle of view. Note, however, that using this could create some vignetting, especially on wide-angle lenses.


8

The only thing you have to be mindful of is with wide angle lenses. You just want to make sure that with the step up ring and filter attached that you don't see the filter edge in the field of view. Slim filters can help with that. Otherwise it's just fine. I do the same myself with 77mm filters.


7

The diameter you're seeing is for the filter threads; it's unrelated to image quality. If anything, there are disadvantages to a larger thread diameter (assuming the other specifications are similar): they tend to be heavier, bulkier, and filters to fit them are substantially more expensive. If you are concerned about image quality and handling, you should ...


6

The only ones I encountered is not being able to use a lens hood and not working at all with lenses which have a built-in lens hood. It is possible it may vignette on some lenses but I have not seen it happen on a DSLR. On one fixed-lens camera I needed a slim step-up ring by the manufacturer to do the trick. Based on the cost of good filters, this is the ...


5

Generally speaking, a larger front element is necessary to achieve a wider maximum aperture. More specifically, a larger front element helps achieve the necessary "entrance pupil" diameter required for a given lens, provides the necessary primary light-gathering power of a lens, and helps achieve the necessary angle of view of the lens. (The entrance pupil ...


5

Yes a 49mm - 58mm step up ring is what you need. Here is one at BHPhotoVideo for example. And here are a bunch of results at amazon. I would also consider one of the kits that come with multiple step up rings such as this: http://www.amazon.com/Fotodiox-Anodized-49-52mm-52-55mm-55-58mm/dp/B001G445Q4/ref=pd_bxgy_p_text_y


5

If you want to buy just one filter and use it on both lenses, you can buy an appropriate step-up ring. Buy your filter at the 58mm size, and then get a 52-58mm step up ring to adapt the filter to your smaller lens.


4

49mm It never fails to research the lens and read the specs online. And there will be no room for mistake there: Olympus 50mm 1.8 Look for 'filter size', naturally.


4

No, a designation of f/1.4 implies the same ratio between focal length and aperture in both lenses. So if you're shooting the same scene, both lenses will give you the exact same shutter speed wide open (unless you vary your ISO...) From what I've read on the Sigma, the larger opening diameter means less vignetting wide open. I haven't observed this ...


4

You got it backwards. What you need is a step-up ring. This lets you use the largest size of filters on lens with smaller thread diameter. It works just as expected and is that is exactly what I do most of the time. There are two downsides to doing this: Lens hood no longer fits. This is really the big one, particularly for polarizers which are generally ...


4

There is always a specification. You will find it in three places: On the lens, either at the edge around the front optical element or on the side of the barrel. In the manual that came with your lens. On the web. Here is one on Sigma's site. Click Tech Specs to see the table where it says Filter-Size. There will be many numbers on the lens itself but ...


4

I believe that the easiest way to find out the filter size of a lens is to look at the lens cap. Pretty much the only information that you would find on the cap is who made it and the filter size that it fits. (Provided of course that it's the type of lens cap that attaches to the filter thread.) The lens cap from my Sigma 50-500 lens for example has this ...


3

To get a smaller threaded lens to work with a 58mm adaptor just requires the appropriate stepping ring. You can get an entire set of these for not much money, or you can measure the lens to find out exactly which size you need (my money would be on the value stated on the lens itself to be the correct one): ...


3

Most answers given above is great. Also, I'd like to point out one reason not being mentioned -- sensor (or film) size. Nikon DX lenses (for instance) are designed for their 1.5x crop dSLR's, so basically, when you mount one of those on one of their full-frame dSLR's, you will get vignetting in the edges/corners. The size of the image circle being cast by ...


3

The larger front element doesn't translate directly to a faster aperture -- since they're both rated at f/1.4, they theoretically collect the same amount of light. At least in most tests I've seen, it appears that the Sigma does vignette less than the Nikon though. It also retains relatively round out-of-focus highlights toward the edge of the frame, where ...


3

The focal length and aperture of the lens are all that really matter in this context. In both cases, the focal length is 50mm and the aperture is f/1.4 which means that the opening that is allowing the light through is approximately 36mm wide. This is true no matter how large the lens barrel is and so the lenses will collect the same amount of light given ...


3

I think you are comparing way to wide of a range of lenses. Take a simple comparison, such as the Nikkor 85mm f/1.8D AF and 85mm f/1.4D AF. The 1.8 uses a 62mm filter, and the 1.4 uses a 77mm filter. Another great comparison is the following set of lenses, where we have three apertures all at the same focal length. The Canon 50mm f/1.8, 50mm f/1.4, 50mm ...


2

You could use a full-aperture solar filter that's appropriate for astronomy use. Orion sells many: http://www.telescope.com/catalog/search.cmd?form_state=searchForm&keyword=solar+filter Advantage of this kind is that it would be safe to look through with your eyes.


2

Usage of color filters in digital photography has already been covered in another question. There certainly are at least 21 lenses with 49mm filter size, all of them for Pentax and Sony. Also, some compact cameras use that filter size, e.g. Fuji X100 (with either AR-X100 adapter or an extra 49mm filter frame).


2

I'm using a '49mm-52mm Step-Up Ring' and a '52mm Macro Reverse Adapter Ring for Pentax K' to reverse mount my SMC PENTAX-A 1:2 50mm lens which has a 49mm filter thread. It's working great and I don't see any disadvantage. Of course it would be cheaper and simpler to use a '49mm Macro Reverse Adapter' but I was unable to find one in the local store (many ...


2

The lens barrel of Z990 should have a 48.5 mm thread. This is not a standard filter size, but looks like some people have succeeded in modifying 49mm filters to fit by filing the thread slightly smaller. Another option is to use a filter adapter tube, but it seems very likely that the tube will black out corners and edges on shorter focal lengths.


2

You have to look for the ΓΈ symbol in the objective or the number behind the frontal cup of your camera. However the simplest thing to do is to use a ruler and measure from the inner edge of your camera. Take the maximum diameter you'll find and than search for the filter that most fit the measure. If you post a photo with a ruler near the objective I can ...


2

the camera that you own, the Nikon L820 is a bridge /semi-pro camera. and there is no lens thread on the edge of your lens. so you can not fix an filter or a hood on your camera's lens (very unfortunate). however you can make your own lens hood and fix it :p , materials required: Paper cup / plastic cup Blade/cutter Procedure: measure the diameter ...


2

A little searching shows that a company called Kiwifotos put together a hood and filter adapter kit. Should be just what you need; uses 62mm filters: http://www.ebay.com/itm/LENS-ADAPTER-FILTER-SET-NIKON-COOLPIX-L820-62MM-KIT-/330904438399


2

The adapter you linked to allows using Cokin 'P' filters on a lens with 77mm filter threads. You could buy it plus another adapter for your 72mm lens and then use a Cokin P153 or P154 ND filter for both. The square Cokin filters do not have threads, they are made to fit into the holder which needs the correct ring threaded to fit a specific lens thread size. ...



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