Mist

by Jakub

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1

An easy way to experiment with the look of old films is using this online emulator and if you are interested in the technology behind it, parts of the source code seem available (make sure to read the license carefully, though, it's not "free" software). The whole thing is based on color lookup-tables, see also Pat David's blog: ...


4

Can you use it? Of course... no one would stop you, but if you mean what results you'd get, odds are the film will be darkened along its edges by light leakage, and there may have been some chemical reaction with the air. If it is monochrome film, though, and the camera was not subjected to high temperatures (over 25 C) or high humidity, the film may work ...


0

Well, it's four years now and as we all know, digital sensors are being packed with way much more photosites than ever. With today's technology, in a given format size, a digital sensor is far much better than film in terms of noise and resolution. Please notice the "given format size." I have scanned film negatives and I find that my Nikon D5500 (24MP) ...


0

The topic of downscaling is very broad, but I think that these pages are the most complete guide to image resize: http://www.imagemagick.org/Usage/filter/ http://www.imagemagick.org/Usage/filter/nicolas/ There you can find examples and discussion about the best ways to preserve detail without introducing artifacts, from the simpler algorithms to the most ...


0

As others have hinted at here, if you examine the picture of your damaged film you'll notice that: 1) The tears run left-to-right in the direction that the camera winds-on. 2) The damage appears to only be on the bottom sprocket holes, which line up with the teeth of the sprocket on your camera. 3) Since there are no problems with mis-fed frames (you'd ...


3

Kodak produced a Royal Gold and Ektar at 1000 ISO and there is a Fuji Superia 1600 available on Amazon. But they are quite rare - if we take a look at the microscope images of photographic film (which also has some notes on how film is constructed) you'll see that the TMAX 400 film is already starting to run low on space for more crystals and it's ...


0

Storing in the fridge is preferred. Temperature changes only really affect film at higher temps, not lower ones. Though probably best not to freeze the stuff.


0

Think they just referred to that as the Polaroid One-Step camera. Just happens to be a different version of it with colored plastic.


3

You can also use the film leader from another canister, as shown in this video. The steps are as follows: Wet the emulsion side of the film leader to make it sticky (saliva or water will do the trick) Insert the wet leader in the fully wound canister Turn the wound canister reel clockwise a few times Pull the wet leader out in a quick swift motion If it ...


0

I went to Foto Skoda as suggested in the comments and found what I was looking for. It's worthy to note that the in-store selection is substantially more limited with respect to the online catalogue, as one would expect. Nevertheless the shop is well equipped to cater for basic needs, such as the ones I had, and the prices are acceptable.


1

My question essentially is: the dyes that are in photographic film are just different chemicals that react to the silver bromide complex during development. Undeveloped film does not contain dyes. It contains couplers. When the film is developed, the couplers react with the developer agent from the developer and dye is created. This is only happening ...



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