glasses

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by Meysam                

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1

Composition I would break the composition of the image down foreground of the mounted rider middle ground of the regiment against a treeline background of the mountains. Color The color scheme is a good example of (the currently trending) blue-orange hues from the days before digital manipulation (more on blue-orange here). Technique The time ...


3

Some people seem to assume that using a film emulation filter will make every photo they take have the same characteristics as an image they like that was taken using the particular film being emulated. This is not the case any more than using the same film under vastly different lighting conditions to take two different photos would produce the same ...


-1

I have slides and negatives in trays and sleeves 50 + years old..still fine.Room temps and in the dark.


1

I would like to send them to scan by a professional laboratory but I would rather not hire the service should they not be still good. The results will be a function of both the quality of the negatives and the quality of the service. A sensible approach would be to start with a small test batch and see how they do. Even if they negatives have ...


2

Archive requirements for film generally err on the cautious side. A couple of years ago I had all my colour negatives scanned. These spanned the period 1971-2003, and had been stored in a variety of places and conditions, many of them far from ideal. While I had a small percentage of failures, these tended to be physical damage to the frames, rather than ...


5

Processed film does deteriorate, but not at such a rate that surviving 10-15 years would be remarkable! It also depends on the type of film; black & white film lasts longer than colour film for example. (Indeed, when film studios want to store an old colour movie, they separate the colour film into its R, G and B channels, and record each channel ...


2

It certainly depends on quality of processing, film brand, gasses in the storage area and other factors, but in general, 10-15 years should not be a big deal. There may be some color shifts but it should be possible to fix them during or after scanning. Humidity may be a problem. Check the films for spots, stains etc.


0

I am getting the same problem. I bought a 100' roll at Henry's last Winter when it was half price. I wonder if they know something we don't. Tried Ilford HP5, Fomapan 400 no problem. Went back to tri-x and the streaks are back. Definitely the film is problematic


0

Kodak used to make gelatin filters that were paper thin. Not sure if they still make them. Vignetting is probably an issue of size/diameter of the filter, though. Consider rectangular filter systems from Lee, HiTech or others. I personally don't use these filters anymore and dial the correction in photo editing application.


6

"Nature (plants, flowers, etc.)" is so broad and nebulous, that it sounds like you're just trying to make up a subject that you think might be easy, but as you don't know much or are interested in nature (plants, flowers, etc.), nothing's occurring to you. I'm a nature (landscape, wildlife, plant macro) photographer because I like and am interested in ...


2

The camera simply needed its batteries changed. I also cleared out a bit of blue battery gunk from a previous battery leak. The autofocus seemed much "snappier" when I put changed the batteries, but the shutter still did not fire. This gave me enough confidence that I put a cheap film in and sure enough it is working perfectly (as far as I can tell before ...


1

May I suggest two alternatives (pick one): Go with 100 mm square filter system. The major drawback is the up front cost, as well as limited practical interoperability with a collection of round screw-in filters you already own (they can work together, but certain combinations are tricky or downright tedious to work with). The benefit is that you have a ...


0

Brew lotsa coffee. You're going to need it. The short answer is that the results will be a compromise between what is possible and what you expect. Here're the details… NO, not if you ever expect anything that will become un-noticeable at ANY level of scrutiny. When I tried this after ONE similar tragedy, I gave up after many hours of multi-level ...


1

The vignette you are experiencing is due to the diameter of the filter and its rim. Your wide-angle lens is blocked it the edges by fact that the filters you are using are too small. You need to purchase larger diameter filters. As to filter thickness: The key to filter quality is the parallelism of the filter. Filters need to be optically flat and large ...


3

There is nice third-party add-on from Google called Nik. It was paid but they released it free. It cooperates nicely with Photoshop and Lightroom. Black and White: https://www.google.com/nikcollection/products/silver-efex-pro/ Color: https://www.google.com/nikcollection/products/color-efex-pro/ There are several film presets as well as possibility to do ...


8

It seems that the problem is caused by having Digital ICE turned on for B&W photos. See example here. It's worth noting that the preview must be made again if the Digital ICE checkbox is changed.


1

Green tint is from poor scan job but the fog is because negatives were underexposed. The picture of the film on the light table does not look underexposed. Except perhaps one frame. Green fog comes from light leaks in the camera. All my other films done with the same camera don't have this problem. Light leaks usually aren't uniform across ...


1

Use the Punched Paper Technology: The hole should be placed close to the lens so its image becomes blurred, creating the vignette effect. Different lens and apertures might need different placement. Of course the color depends on our diaphragm color and lighting.


1

Spread a thin layer of Vaseline/petroleum jelly around the edges of the lens. Smooth it to as uniform a thickness as possible. Shine a bright light directly at the camera from just out of the field of view. Adjust the distance/brightness/angle of the light until you have the amount of the effect you want. If you're concerned about having to clean the lens ...


2

The traditional method would be to vignette the enlarger during printing. Since dark becomes light in that process, the result is a white border in the print. You can adjust the hardness or softness of this border by varying distance (or by moving it during the process, as one might for dodging). An article on this from Shutterbug mentions creating dark ...


1

Some things to try to troubleshoot the problem… The colour of the film base, if not corrected accurately, could shift the colour of the scans in a consistent way toward green for all the shots on the roll regardless of the density of individual images. The exposure looks useable to me. Look closely at the edge numbering of the film. The exposure of that ...


0

As it turns out, film is not only light-sensitive as we understand it. It is also pressure sensitive. Folding, bending, pressing, or stressing emulsion gelatine (film) will produce an image (a difference from the unaffected area). Physicists will tell you that light exerts pressure and can even be weighed. It's not much of a stretch, then, that what you did ...


0

Process a sheet from the top (check the notches). Look for a light strike. If you don't see any, then you're probably good to go. The back has a light absorbing/anti-reflection coating and is less likely to have a problem than the top sheet. Either way, remember that the light strike is not image-forming and cannot compromise your image unless quite fogged ...


0

The early "black" Konica Hexar AF had a silent mode that was very good. For complicated reasons Konica disabled it in later versions of the camera. But it was still there in the firmware and could be hacked back into existence. Plus it had a sweet 35/2. Plus active AF that focused perfectly in complete darkness. They even used IR for the active AF so there ...


0

There was a Canon Rebel model that had a semi transparent mirror, so half the light went to the viewfinder and half could pass to the film, so there was no need to flip the mirror, which is the loudest process on a SLR camera. On a tween lens camera there is no need to flip any mirror at all, so the cameras were very silent.



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