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by Rodrigo

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2

There is some useful info on this from Kodak here: Storage and Care of KODAK Photographic Materials Quoting from this Kodak publication: "Glass mounts do not have any significant effect on the useful life of slides except to help protect them from dirt and scratches. (Before you mount slides in glass mounts, be sure that the glass surfaces are clean.) ...


2

As you see in the responses this has to do with both color balance and the specific color rendering of the film. This said, almost all the film stock produced today is daylight balanced, making it pretty difficult to find tungsten balanced film (which gives you strong blue cast if shot under sunlight). The subtle differences that you observed have more to do ...


2

Film doesn't really have a "specific" color temperature, but there is more generic color temperature classifications: daylight and tungsten. Most film is daylight balanced (somewhere around 5600K); experiment with various emulsions and you'll see some warmer and cooler variants, but I don't think you'll find an actual color temperature for any of them. ...


1

Every film has its own color rendition. It can't be really called "temperature", as chemistry have nonlinear response. It so hard to quantify there is almost no objective information. Best what you can find is some subjective comparisons. I'd recommend to buy one roll of each and find out which suits your taste. Many people have their picks for different ...


1

Some cameras had no means of controlling anything. Some automatic cameras, however, used a small photovoltaic cell to move an internal spring-loaded "meter movement". Note that the cell could produce only a tiny amount of electricity, but that a sensitive meter movement doesn't take much. Note that the meter movement did not directly have to move anything ...


0

I still have an Olympus XA2 camera somewhere. It had an extremely quiet shutter - not much louder than a pin drop. If I can dig it up I can try to record the sound of the shutter compared to some other sounds (like a pin drop). The film advance (manual/thumb click wheel) was considerably louder than the shutter. See ...


5

I depends on the camera, but it probably doesn't matter all that much, especially for newer models. Some medium format folks are religious about always keeping the works in tension. Some models only engage and link with the lens when cocked, and this linkage is key to whole works -- you can't even remove a lens without cocking the shutter release in some ...


4

It is probably only advisable to enter tension in the system if your camera is being transported (e.g. travelling on a bumpy road), as some force may keep moving things in place. Prolonged tension of springs may result in them "aging" (dislocations (errors) in the metal accumulate and eventually crack), see fracture. Tension can also result in creep. And if ...


2

Reciprocity errors and their recommended corrections are usually described in film data sheets like this one for Portra, but unfortunately, for Portra in particular the information is not helpful (no correction up to 1 second, otherwise, test it on your own). Sharp results - you obviously need a tripod. If you shoot stars or moon, there are formulas how to ...


6

All you can do is experiment, really. Nighttime photography has its own peculiar set of problems, especially where film is concerned, and you really can't rely on anything that looks like an easy recipe. Reciprocity failure is a thing, and it's variable with conditions (temperature, mostly) and film age as well as with extended exposure time. I don't know ...


4

Kipon make tilt shift adapters for SLR lenses with various mirrorless mounts. I have an Olympus OM -> E mount tilt shift adapter from them. Olympus's OM SLR lenses are incredibly compact, so pairing one with a NEX body gives a very compact tilt-shift package. Here are some examples of the adapter on an A7R with 21mm and 50mm OM lenses: With the A7R ...


4

Options The NeinGrenze 5000T point and shoot digital camera is probably the smallest option out there. It is specifically for selective focus to achieve the "miniature effect" and is not going to give you full control of either tilt or shift, although it has some tilt control I guess. Another option would be a Lensbaby lens such as the Composer Pro. Again ...


1

Saw this old thread but could not resist sharing my experience for at least one person to maybe benefit from it. I'm in the middle of converting thousands of color negs mostly Kodak Gold 100, 200, and 160NC. I use a Nikon D810 Camera, 105mm f2.8D Micro Nikkor, Two D700 flashes in a plywood light mixing box with two 1/8" diffusers, a neg carrier that is 2" ...


5

I think something along the lines of "Digital print from 35mm film negative" should sum it up quite well - it clearly states that the original photo was taken on 35mm. I don't think you need to say that it was scanned. Scanning is I guess the standard way to transfer film negatives to digital format, but obviously there are also other ways, eg a device for ...


0

I have been thinking about it for a while myself, after having shot a couple of rolls in a plastic-fantastic SLR I got when I didn't know better. It was very rewarding, but a bit expensive. This is what I would do to keep costs manageable: Buy a second-hand mechanical SLR and some prime lenses. Great combination, really cheap these days. Get a roll of ...


2

I started out with a K 1000 in the 1980s and have never found a DSLR to match the ability to be able to control every aspect of an image before you snap the shutter. I'm going to do a shoot for a junior-level anthropology class and have a photo ethnography project to complete by semester's end and I'm leaving my DSLR at home and strapping on my Pentax with a ...



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