Serene Life

by garik

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0

This part does not seem like it would be the kind of thing that's very replacable, although this is an assumption. If RB backs are the same as RZ backs then the little bit that holds the film spool in place just needs to be circular so the roll of film can rotate. I would consider trying some modelling putty or a tiny piece of sugru and moulding a small ...


0

It won't make any difference, except (perhaps) to the film that was already pulled out of the canister. The canister, after all, is designed to keep light off of the film while you handle it in the open, and it does a very good job of it. So your first shot or perhaps the second and the edge of a third might be affected at most. Even then, the light path to ...


0

The result will be distorted colours and a negative, not positive, image. Colour negative films have an orange 'mask' that slide films do not have. The 'mask' helps give better colour reproduction. These films have separate processes for a reason.


2

Development by inspection is obsolete. It was used in the distant past (in other words, before about 1930) when films or plates were much less sensitive in general and almost completely insensitive to red. If attempted today, with fast panchromatic films, you will fog the film, no matter which safelight is used. Development by time and temperature is ...


5

apply the fixer once you're happy with the result I actually use stop bath. I assume you can't use the same chemicals you'd use normally, right? I followed Jeno Dulovits on this, basically using D23 diluted in half. Rodinal works quite good too, especially for the old emulsions. I know people using HC-110. See Antec saying "High sulfite ...


3

You may have heard of negatives from the beginning of 20th century, processed just recently. Much depends on the type emulsion and storage conditions. I never tried it with colour negatives, but processed some b/w German and US films from the times of WWII. The storage conditions were not so good, so I started cutting 5mm strips from the loading end until I ...


0

Many years ago I had a missing negative but a print produced! They lost it after they printed. But other funny details pointed to a cover up, piecing together end from a different roll. I asked online (Compuserve if anyone remembers that) and was told that photo places often messed up and hide it blaming the customer. That included posts from pros who ...


0

The thing that changes with pinhole camera size is the best pinhole diameter to use. The optimal pinhole diameter is such that your pinhole-to-paper distance is the "Fresnel length" (please google for definition) of the pinhole at some representative wavelength of your filter bandpass. If you don't use a filter then you can guesstimate the sensitivity of ...


1

I would agree that images missing from the middle point directly to either a mechanical issue, or some other factor where the lens was blocked. A severe under-exposure could also be the culprit. In regards to your question about this possibly being an issue caused by your film processing vendor: If the film itself shows edge print - the text on the edges ...


5

If you are sure you took 10 photos in the middle of the roll and they don't appear, it sounds like there is a mechanical problem that prevented the film advancing and prevented the shutter opening for 10 exposures, which somehow then righted itself after those exposures. There is a slight chance it could be due to not fully winding the film on during that ...


1

In the days of film, you didn't have immediate feedback of if you got the histogram right or not (it might have been possible for some high end cameras to do it when they had 1000 pixel exposure meters - the 3d color matrix metering - on a film body - but that time was so quick in passing to practical DSLRs that it didn't make sense). The key thing was, you ...


2

Yikes!! I couldn't imagine superimposing more than one negative onto a single print. even minor changes in the composition or small misalignment of negatives (film) in the enlarger would blur your print. Carrying around thousands of images in the film era meant having a sizeable backpack and hours squinting in a dark room. "Bracketing" is merely a term ...


7

It could also be used to have different exposure and thus a higher chance of getting it right (you can't see them on screen). But film is also post-processable, though trickier and less flexible. Dodging, burning, even HDR were fairly common techniques in the film era. Just look at the history of HDR on Wikipedia. There is a very nice answer by Michael ...


7

The use of exposure bracketing for HDR images has obscured it's original purpose, which was to ensure you got as single exposure that is as good as it can be for the scene. Camera light meters are not accurate and handheld units have their limitations. If you can't go back and want to make sure you got the exposure right in at least one shot you could use ...



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