Napioa - Wind Origins

Napioa - Wind Origins
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0

The Canon A-E1 is a great 35mm starter camera. All of the manual controls are straight forward and new digital SLR cameras share similar functions. Lenses and accessories are easy to find online and at pawn/thrift stores. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canon_AE-1


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Many of the Yashica fixed-lens rangefinders have illuminated fame lines. The canon QL cameras do as well. If you want to scale up a bit, the Fuji GW690, GF670, GS645 and their siblings all have illuminated frames. That should get you started at least. There are tons of fixed lens rangefinders out there so it would be difficult to go through them all.


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My favorite was the Nikon SP - sold it to buy the Nikon F in 1958.


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Googling around, it looks like you might be thinking of a Sawyer Bi-Lens 35mm slide viewer. Some were stereoscopes, some weren't, and apparently, some came with a built-in light and some didn't. It looks like there are a number for sale on eBay and the like (mostly with the built-in light and not the diffusion panel on the back), but as these are '50s / ...


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My conclusio after investigations and a lot of trying on my own is, that labs are using Software mostly set to auto-correct the image (e.g whitebalance, tinting). Thats why sometimes images of the same roll are looking different in color cast, depending on how "good" the Software was able to calculate whitebalance etc. Scanning cross processed film at home ...


1

Esten is right. As I'm developing film at home I noticed, that for example the chemistry changes color during development of the Agfaphoto Precisia CT 100 to purple. The film base layer itself is also purple after developing. Inverting purple gives green - the typical green color shift of cross processing this film. It looks like the C-41 chemistry is not ...


0

The OP asked for a 35mm scanner. Depending on the quantity of originals to scan, a dedicated 35mm scanner may prove faster (in relative terms). I have a Canon 35mm scanner and an Epson V600. Both use either Silverfast or Vuescan. I can understand the RAW requirement, but for all intent and purposes a TIFF file will do as well. Color slides and negatives are ...


0

The R72 has a filter factor of 16. Now a filter factor is a multiplier. We use this value by multiplying the exposure time without filter. Thus if the exposure time without filter is 1 second, then 1 x 16 = 16 seconds with the filter mounted. Alternately, the published ISO without filter is divided by the filter factor. If a film is rated at ISO 400 without ...


1

So I got myself a Reflecta RPS 10M and made a comparison with my now old Epson V350. I scanned a color negativ, a cross processed and a black & white image, uploaded them as jpg. For converting the color negativ to a positive I used the PS plug-in "ColorPerfect" with the settings it suggested but without film-presets. Converting the cross processd and ...


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It can depend on how the light-tight bag is made. Black and lined and a double zip is usually light proof. If the film was outside the double dark slide and you were hoping to use it in a critical shoot, I would discard it and accept the cost of the error rather than use it and risk ruining the image. It won't be an error that you will make again. As a ...


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The V350 was replaced by the V300 photo scanner. I use a V700 which can scan optically to 6400 dpi and has a dynamic range (Dmax) of 4.0. Your scanner has a dynamic range of 3.2 and an optical resolution of 4800 dpi. Some photos may need a Dmax of 3.4 and occasionally some transparencies will approach a Dmax of 4.0. It is likely that C41 negative film will ...


2

I scan negatives and slides to create RAW files. It is largely a matter of scanner resolution limits and software. I use an Epson V700 which has a transparency scanner, film holders and a selection of software. It also can scan natively to 6400 pixels per inch. The software I use is Silverfast and Vuescan. Scanning film at sufficient resolution can be a ...


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I suspect metering will not be useful in that situation. The metering responds to visible light, which the filter blocks. The metering does not respond to infrared, which the filter passes. I think you are on trial and error. This article (with some experience) says compensate to about 9 stops down ...


1

Perhaps the proper question is, what is the filter factor for the R72 filter. (how many stops of light does x filter block ) i am sure there is a general filter factor known for the filter but i do not know it. I would shoot the film at its rated ISO ( unless i have tested the film with my development and determined that another ISO gives better results ( ...


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I know my answer comes years late but if anyone here in the future is looking into this I have just a couple suggestions. EF lenses (red dot) do work on any Canon EOS camera film or digital. Film is a lot of fun and I encourage anyone to try it. You would get a lot out of a junior college film course. You will learn to shoot and also how to develop and ...


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It sounds like what you did inside the bottom cover only solved half your problem. You can now advance the film, but the shutter button (or linkage between the button and the shutter) seems to still be stuck in the "fire" position. Given the price for this body is quite low on the internet, is it possible to fix it myself so I don't have to send it to a ...


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Given the two choices you list I would definitely go with the Nikon. It is far and away a better camera and much better for learning photography. There are many old lenses that you can get for it to expand your shooting options, but more importantly, you can and should use it in full manual mode to learn the relationship of how exposure is affected by ...


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This is probably not the answer you are looking for but here I go. I really do not understand your dilema. Do you really want to learn film photography (i.e., do you want to learn how to develop and process film)? If yes, then either camera will work fine for you. Do you already know photography (i.e., composition, exposure, focal length, DOF)? If no, ...



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