Shadowy Daisy

Shadowy Daisy
by damned-truths

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4

I think your film was processed by hand or semi-automated equipment in a small lab. These appear to be squeegee marks from your description of them. Automated equipment produces consistent and parallel results. You describe inconsistent and irregular results. Inconsistencies usually happen as the result of irregular, unusual, or careless manual processing. ...


7

If the scratches are perfectly parallel with edges of the film, they may be caused by a grain of dirt in the camera or in the film cassette. If the scratches are not perfectly parallel with the film edges, they were most likely made during the processing or after. Scratches in wet emulsion look differently than scratches in dry emulsion. You could try to ...


13

Typically this C-41 35mm film is developed in an automatic film processing machine. Likely your film was developed in in a "roller transport" type machine. These machines transport the film from chemical tank to chemical tank. The film path is over and under a series of plastic rollers. These machines are highly dependent on volume and daily maintenance. If ...


1

In the ECN-2 process there is an alkaline bath applied at the beginning of the proces that releases the remjet coating which is afterwards removed before development. This is hard to replicate manually in complete darkness, because you don't have visual feedback if the layer was properly removed everywhere. But the developer is alkaline as well and releases ...


4

I think using a bath tub for development is a bad idea. you won't be able to clean the bathtub perfectly, after some time you will have some stains in hard to clean areas as far as I know the particular benzene derivative contained in Rodinal is not known as carcinogen, but many similar chemicals are and I would not expose naked bodies of innocent people ...


3

Film photography embraces the use of chemicals. For the most part, the chemicals we use are benign; otherwise the darkrooms of the world would be labeled as a hazardous workplace. Not to say there is absolutely no danger as the potential to mishandle chemicals is with us always. There are a plethora of developer formulas, all have advantages and ...


1

Sorry if I missed this and someone has already pointed it out, but here goes. In an attempt to make your camera seem better than it is (or other reasons I don't know), manufacturers often don't accurately set the ISO. When your 5d mk3 says it's at 100 ISO, it's actually at about 80, you can see the measurements here: http://www.dxomark.com/Cameras/Canon/EOS-...


2

From my experience (25+ years in the photo industry), Fuji film tends to handle overexposure by one stop without the need to pull-process. However, as Alaska Man stated, if you shot mainly in high-contrast or bright lighting, having the roll pulled a half-stop or full stop should help -- not fix 100%, just help. Overexposing actually decreases contrast, not ...


0

What are the points here that would help me decide. expired films may have lower than nominal speed, so consider how old the film is. Perhaps you are not overexposing it after all overexposure will increase contrast and color, this may be wanted or unwanted depending on your subject type of light the film was shot with. If it was shot with incandescent ...


4

I regularly over expose my film by 1/3 to 2/3 or 1 full stop depending on the conditions and the film and with the knowledge of how that film behaves and develops in the developers i use. Generally speaking overexposing film is better (to a point) than underexposing as you can not get details in the shadows in post processing if you did not record those ...


1

Your film was overexposed. The B&W at 400 ISO, f/1.8 and 1/1000s you would have an exposure value around 9.6. The color at 200 ISO, f/1.8 and 1/1000s would give you an EV of 10.7. The 1 stop more dynamic range on the digital allowed for slightly better compensation in the processing. Had you done a 1 stop pull on the film your results may have been ...


2

Definitely looks like a damaged shutter blind-this can happen if you don't use a lens cap on sunny days the sun will burn the blind via the lens


7

There is the potential for variations in many of these steps, but the first one that jumps out at me is that you used the same ISO, aperture, and shutter speed for both exposures. Also, answering your question in a comment on Rafael's answer, "The thing that bothers me is that the exposure meter on the analog camera was showing that the image is too bright ...


10

Film is not brighter, it has different tone curve. In your examples highlights and shadows from negative are translated differently to the print than digital. With traditional films like the HP5 the curve is S-shaped. Also, with the black and white example, each film has certain tonal response to different colors, your digital conversion to bw has a ...


5

There is some latitude with regard to ISO sensitivity. Digital cameras often are less sensitive than the rated "base" sensitivity. The manufacturers tend to round up because it can make test results look better than they actually are. With film the manufacturers tend to round the sensitivity down. With either film or digital the response curve from the ...


1

The digital camera has a higher dynamic range than the film; as a result, film will not be able to show the bright and the dark areas with the same details as the digital camera. In this case, you lost the details in the bright areas, they have started to burn out. If the development would have been done slightly darker, the brighter areas would look ...


4

They could simply not have the scanner calibrated, or they have some arbitrary values. You need to analize the negative and check if it is really that overexposed. But also take into account that even between film manufacturers the look has diferent results.


1

I do not know of an exact website to fit your question but i would suggest http://www.apug.org/forum/home . It is all about analogue photography, with discussions of films, papers, chemicals, techniques etc. I find it to a kinder place to ask questions and have a conversation then stackexchange sites. Plus it does not have the draconian and judgemental ...


0

You can find simulations in Google Nik instrument Analog Efex Pro, with a lot of tools on FF films.


2

One function of these canisters is that they prevent moisture condensation on films removed from a fridge or cold outdoor environment. Water condensation is a big problem, because wet emulsion swells and becomes sticky. The film can easily become unusable. Wet film, especially in the past was an excellent substrate for fungus. Swelling, sticking and fungus ...


0

Short answer first. What is the actual color space of film in film photography? There is none. Now long version. Colour space is a mathematical abstraction. Colour space defines mapping between device values and percieved values. It is not entirely correct to say that some camera (sensor) or film has a colour space because almost no camera's or ...


3

I foud this graphic on photo.net, in a thread discussing the same topic: I can't vouch for its veracity, but it looks reasonable. Both of the depicted films are a bit wider than AdobeRGB in the reds, but much shorter in green. But see the discussion on the next page, deeply saturatd greens require high densities and thus dark colours, which this chart ...


2

It depends. (Don't you hate answers like this?) For each kind of colour film, the manufacturer is obliged to find a complementary dye "set" to use in combination with each of the three different wavelength light sensitive layers R, G, & B. There is a direct comparison of photo optical process analogous to electromechanical imaging materials and ...


1


4

I think it was the EktaSpace that was invented to hold all colors of films. Since silver halide color papers are still used as media for printing from digital, there are also color profiles of photographic papers floating around the Internet. See https://www.drycreekphoto.com/icc/ for examples. These should give you some idea. As you can imagine, ...


0

Before the current color systems there was the Munsell System of color notion developed by Albert H. Munsell. This is a three-dimensional, tree shaped arrangement. He prepared all the colors which can be represented using swatches over coated using pigments. The various hues are placed horizontal around a circle of ten major hues. This was followed by the ...


3

Today those of us not in the color reproduction industry as a profession tend to talk and hear a lot more about certain color spaces that a particular imaging device can or cannot support than our counterparts heard before the digital imaging age. Saying an image device (such as a camera) supports a standardized color space means it is capable of producing ...


3

During exposure light travels through emulsion, bounces back from the backing layer and exposes the emulsion again, this time with blurred light, adding halos to the image. This reflection can be prevented by adding opaque dark layer behind the emulsion. Due to the nature of b&w films, the layer is made of soluble dye. Most of the dye is removed ...


3

Each manufacturer uses a slightly different film base. Ilfords is slightly purple, Kodak's slightly cyan on some and Agfa had a slight green cast. This changes by film type as well within a brand. The color can impact the print if you use Variable Contrast paper. Fixing isn't usually a problem related to film base color. Kodak's Tech Pan was the most ...


4

Early photo materials were not very sensitive to light. Additionally bright objects often imaged as a blurred splotch. This imperfection is called a halation. The solution is various colored dyes applied during manufacture. Dying light sensitive silver salt crystals changes their sensitivity and adjusts how they react to different colors. The problem of the ...


14

Its been a very long time, but I believe this is caused by inadequate rinsing of the negative during processing. The film has a coating to reduce light reflecting from the film backing itself. It is usually rinsed away, but seeing a slight purple tinge on negatives is likely very familiar to those who have developed their own B&W film. The coating is ...


6

The color of a B&W negative is irrelevant unless you're using color print paper. If you have true B&W paper, then all that it cares about is the relative irradiance. You could print with any color negative and get a B&W image. If your print is what appears to be tinted, then either the paper is not what you think it is (e.g., there are styles ...


1

I have left paper in fixer for nearly 24 hrs and it does craze (look like fine hairlines running though parts of the image) and some parts, in streaks, did turn a rusty colour.


3

Don't be so quick to assume that very fast film was used in these shots. It probably wasn't, in fact. Fast color film in the 1950-60s was 400 or 800 speed and didn't look all that great. Let's look at them: The photo of the F-104 was taken from another aircraft, perhaps even another F-104. That being the case it is entirely possible both planes were ...


8

I suspect many shots intended for publishing were shot on Kodachrome. The images might also be affected by print processing (and aging), so what you see is not necessarily the film look alone. Kodachrome has been discontinued. Color photography technology changed a lot since 50's. Many changes in the technology addressed color accuracy and grain, so ...


1

Inkista's answer is comprehensive. That being said: I have an Olympus E-P5 MFT camera from 2013, and I have bought an adapter for my old OM-mount lenses that I use occasionally. Initially, my thought process was similar to yours. Experiences: Good adapters cost as much as a new kit lens. You can buy cheap adapters on Ebay. No matter what, a full-metal ...


2

Only if you prefer the ease of use with folding bellows as compared to bag bellows. Bag bellows can be prone to sag in a way that partially blocks some of the light from the lens. Depending on the type and number of movements used, it may not always be obvious from just a cursory look if part of the bag is in the light path or not. They're also fussier to ...


6

Hate to say it, but you're unicorn-hunting. There is no such beast. Understand that you're shooting a camera with a 2x crop factor. So, a "normal" lens is 25mm. And if you're looking at all classic film-era lenses to adapt to your camera, you're also looking at lenses from an age when 24mm was an exotic super-wide lens. And when f/2.8 was pretty much the ...


0

You'll need an adapter. The best option is to use Olympus adapter for Zuiko classic 4/3 lens. If you can live without some automatic functions, then you may also use other vendor's lenses and one of good but not cheap solutions is Metabones speed booster which will even make your lenses faster (and wider).


54

Photo films and papers are made from salts of silver that naturally only darken when exposed to violet or blue light. In the early days of photography, this was all that was available. Therefore these films and papers are able to be handled under any light source that does not radiate blue light. By the way, the violet and blue frequencies of light are the ...


1

Basic silver halides used in darkroom photography are sensitive to blue light. Special chemicals are added to the emulsion to extend the sensitivity range to other visible colors. Some materials are sensitive to all colors (reversal and negative color films, reversal and negative panchromatic b&w films), some have minor gaps in sensitivity (color papers ...


11

it seems a little odd that there is a type of light that doesn't affect film or developing paper etc. There are types of light that don't affect the rods and cones in your retina, too. You can't see infrared or ultraviolet light even though some other animals can. It's the same idea with photographic materials: they vary in their sensitivity to different ...


0

A "safelight" is only safe for black & white processing from a distance and not for extended periods of time. The materials are less sensitive to the red or brown light wavelengths used in these lights.



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