Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

by sat

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I would put louvres high in the door and a take-out fan in the window. This draws air from the house through the darkroom and out of the window. The cats would be safe, since the chemically laden air would go straight out, not back into the house. Also I would put a slightly more powerful fan in the door, so as to blow in more air than the window-fan would ...


1

Late answer, but for posterity I post. As you already say in the comment above this anwer: it is probably a case of not loading the film properly, the film leader slipped off the take-up spool and every exposure was made on the same part of the film (basically on the leader) The good part: if you can extract the film-leader again (there are pretty cheap ...


2

(4 years late, but hopefully useful for other people) A slow shutter curtain can sometimes be "repaired" by excercizing the shutter repeatedly, tens or maybe hundreds of times. Especially in cases like this where the problem only occurs at high shutterspeeds (indicating that the shutter is only small amount slower than a healty shutter.)


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There are several online depth-of-field (DOF) calculators that you can use to gain some understanding and have some initial idea. E.g. see this.


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Start by trying with as low of an aperture number as possible. If the depth of field is too shallow (can't get subject completely in focus), then try increasing it, but there is far more to getting the background blurry and the subject clear. You also want to use the longest focal length you can, be as close to the subject as you can and have the ...


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There's not enough information here to answer, because we're missing several important things. First, does your film SLR have metering? If so, is it "through the lens metering"? If it is a recent camera (1980s or after), the answer is almost certainly "yes", which makes the answer to your question "just do what the camera's meter tells you". The next bit ...


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There's a focus limiting switch - so that when you're doing macro work, it won't hunt through the whole range. Look over the lens and find the switch and turn it off.


2

Short answer is no for the reason you've stated: silver grains in black and white film block light in the same manner as dust. Color images are made of dye clouds which are translucent and do not block light. The only defect repair I'm aware of that works on b/w is SilverFast scanning software, which has a feature called SRD (not to be confused with iSRD ...



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