It's a bird

by Vian Esterhuizen

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0

Pretty much all your questions are answered in this guide: http://filmshooterscollective.com/analog-film-photography-blog/a-practical-guide-to-using-film-characteristic-curves-12-25 What does 0.0 value represents (how to interpret it)? This is represented as a log scale, so 0.0 passes a certain value of light, 1.0 passes 1/10 that amount of light, 2.0 ...


0

I have personal experience doing this with a few developers, most recently Ilfosol-3 and Ilfotec HC.I would use the HC as a single-shot developer if you are pushing, perhaps you could squeeze out two uses. In experimenting with reusing single-shot Ilfosol, I noticed similar results with reusing HC that had been involved in push processing. Neither of those ...


2

The predecessor to safety film; nitrocellulose film (nitrate film), based upon guncotton was by and large the most common base before Kodak began working with acetate film in 1948, bringing it to market in the early 1950's. This acetate film was marketed as safety film, for it did not decompose as nitrate film did. Nitrate film was inherently flawed in ...


5

It means the underlying film stock is NOT nitrocellulose (aka cellulose nitrate aka "nitrate"), which is dangerously flammable. But it seems silly now, the last nitrate film was produced in 1950.


0

Nikon started to produce camera with rangefinders in 1948 (1, M, S, S2 etc...) and these ones does not have exposure metering (of my knowledge as I don't own any). Here is the rangefinders model list and some documentation here. After they started with the professional reflex (SLR) Nikon serie F, F2, F3, etc... In this generation only the first models were ...


3

It would seem to be a standard Polaroid 600 in a colour that this dude on flickr refers to as Party Blue. Indeed searching for Polaroid 600 Party Blue on Google yields many results showing that camera. According to the Polaroid page on the Camerapedia wiki it belongs to the Polaroid 600 One Step Flash (Close Up) family and it is indeed known under the ...


2

Put them the safest place you can, but even the safest place is never "safe." Remember the Jacques Lowe case? Had extended exclusive access behind the scenes of the Kennedy administration. Put his treasure trove of negs in the toughest vault he could find. In the basement of the World Trade Center.


0

I've never seen numbering for 6x7; every 6x7 back I've seen has auto-spacing.


0

B&H, Adorama, and others may have online sales, but they have regular phone sales as well. Just call them with your film needs. Even if they don't carry the stock, they will have other suggestions.


0

I did a OFX plugin that does the color correction job. Please find the source code here: https://github.com/edubois/kaliscope I will post a binary release very soon (OFX plugin that you can use inside DaVinci resolve for example). You only have to put the RGB values of the filter. Eloi.


2

Because the streaks are all in a perfect vertical orientation my bet is that the scanner is to blame. While it's possible for streaks to happen while processing the negatives I feel that's pretty unlikely to result in the same thing. And it won't be the camera. Possibly the scanner was not properly cleaned or maintained. The only way to be sure is to ...


2

Yes, you can re-wet the film. If you do, make sure it is submersed long enough to be fully wet. Then dry it just like you would freshly developed and rinsed film. That means dipping thru Photo Flu solution as the last step before hanging to dry. Of course the drying area needs to be as dust free as possible. Hang it somewhere air isn't blowing around, ...


2

There are a number of places where you can buy film today. That's mostly online now, but depending on where you live that could also be a specialty shop in your city. To answer your question, 220 and 8x10 are still made, but not for all emulsion types. Ilford (BW only) for example still makes 8x10 but 120 only, Fuji and Foma also make 8x10, Kodak is the ...


1

Whenever new technology comes around, it supposedly kills the older technology that it replaces. The thing is that technologies rarely fully cover the applications of another one. Sure digital has its benefits and replaced film for most applications. The thing is that this doesn't mean that film is actually dead. People really like to see things dying ...


4

You can use it, but it will upset your replenishment schedule. That's why they don't recommend it for reused developers. You can always treat it as a one-shot developer, though - if you have no plans to replenish a given batch (let's say it's been used and replenished already, and is approaching its limits) pushing is no problem, but getting a batch back up ...


0

Ugh... NEVER clean film negatives with water. Use dry microfiber cleaning cloths, or - if you must use a liquid - try the PEC-pads, which are disposable microfiber wipes with the PEC-12 solution already on them. B&H has 100 packs of the PEC-12 4''x 4'' (10cm x 10cm) wipes for ~$8, as do many other photo-supply shops (and amazon, et al).


1

If you want a Nikon, I'd definitely go for the FM or FM2(n) and just not put a battery in. All the battery powers is the meter – without a battery the camera is completely manual. If you want a rangefinder (since you mentioned Leica) but don't want to shell out $5k, there are cheap Russian Soviet-era Leica clones you can find. The Zorki 4 or 4k is commonly ...


2

Cameras before about 1960 generally did not have light meters in them (there were only a very few in the very late 1950s). Those after 1960 mostly did. This corresponds to the introduction of semiconductors. The first Nikon F SLR was 1959, no meter. The Nikon FTn version added a meter in the mid-1960s. There were actual debates around this time about "can ...


2

There have been a few, these are the ones I know about -- (These are all, of course, film cameras) The Nikon SP, a rangefinder camera not using the F mount The Nikon F, the first F mount SLR from that company. The viewfinder/pentaprism was removable and while there was an optional viewfinder with an exposure meter but you didn't have to use one. The Nikon ...


1

Dedicated film scanners are generally accepted to give the best results (and highest resolution) when scanning film. However it's very expensive to buy a good resolution film scanner that will handle both 35mm and medium format negatives. Flatbed scanners, while they boast very high resolutions such as 9600dpi, in most cases are not capable of producing ...


0

Reference: http://www.filmscanner.info/en/FilmscannerTestberichte.html NOTE: The actual numbers might need to be taken with a bit of salt, as do the stubborn recommendation to use Silverfast software for everything. Fact: 2400 dpi scanning of 35mm film creates data just below 8MP. Most if not all flatbed scanners have a maximum output below 2000 dpi in ...


1

You should research/test for your film stock. Note that TriX is about the most versatile film ever. I've pushed it to 1600 successfully, and the net has plenty of examples of it pushed to 3200. Look/ask around for what that will do to the contrast and resolution. Pushing TriX a stop will arguably have little effect if processed right. More importantly ...



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