Spring 2012

Spring 2012
by ani

Submit your Photo
Hall of Fame

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Hot answers tagged

14

A cheap scanner will take about one minute per negative or photo: that's 3/4 year of full-time work to scan all this stuff, not counting the follow-on postprocessing needed to clean up the scans. If you want to continue living your life, consider shipping this material off to a service, as suggested in a related thread and another and another.


12

I would say TIFF is probably the best format. JPEG 2000, like JPEG, is still a lossy compressed format when you really try to save space (the lossless version can compress a bit, but not nearly as much as the lossy form, and some forms of the "lossless" wavelet compression still can't fully reproduce the exact original image.) When scanning in an original ...


6

the blue splotches are from surface contact with the negatives. If you don't want to use the film mask try putting strips of thin cardboard on either side of the film strip. Part of the reason for the film mask/carrier is to prevent just this thing from happening by providing space above and below the negative so there is no surface contact.


5

Fast scanning + Accurate Colour Reproduction without having to post process + Even lighting of the image + $500 USD = :-) ...you must be dreaming, :-) depending of course on what you mean by 'speed' (the main problem) and 'accuracy'. The real option here is Imacon. You have some cheaper solutions in Ken Rockwell's How to Scan Your 3,000 Slide Archive . ...


4

Well, sure there are devices for scanning APS film. You can get an APS adapter for a Nikon Coolscan IV. I have a couple old Minolta DiMAGE Scan Dual IIs that accept APS. You can use a flatbed (V700 is probably the best) with an uncut-120 film holder, secure the film in the holder, then cut the images in Photoshop (scan software, GIMP, whatever) as you scan ...


4

This totally depends on the bundled software. My old scanner had really horrible software that required me to follow something like 7 configuration steps in order to scan negative film - and repeat those steps for every single scan, even if I scan several pieces of negative film in a row. On the other side, some high-end scanners come bundled with ...


3

Advice on your suspected degrading first: store the material properly and it is are more durable than any digital version you create today (the life-time of a harddisk is lower than the life-time of a negative). The only negative effect is that you won't be able to review them today on your PC. On the plus side - you can store them dry, cool and dark for ...


3

http://www.hamrick.com/vuescan/html/vuesc28.htm#inputfocus + lots of experimenting. Don't forget to save your settings regularly in a way you can remember what they are.


3

Welcome Tim, Yes, the Super CoolScan 9000 ED is the best medium format scanner out there w/in reason, I owned one 2 years ago for my 500CM Hasselblad shooting and it was awesome (I since gave up MF for a Leica and changed to a CoolScan 5000 ED). If you're looking to improve your scanning, and you haven't tried it already, get the fluid mount carrier for the ...


2

A great deal of what's going on here is really just color management/matching/profiling. Different films have rather specific "looks", and to get the best out of each, you just about have to profile the scanner with each film. That was common/typical with the high-end professional scanners. If memory serves, some even scanned the bar code that's on the edge ...


2

I think that in looking at the software you are overlooking something really important: The hardware. Different scanners, as with different cameras, use different sensor elements. You do not specify the model of the lab scanner, but let's assume it is the KODAK Professional RFS 3570 Film Scanner, you can buy a second-hand one of these for about £1.7k. ...


2

For the file format choose either TIFF or JPEG with an high quality settings. JPEG is lossy, but you are scanning and archiving not editing and resaving - so if you find the quality settings that gives you acceptable results on JPEG they will stay acceptable for ever - there is no data loss while the files are on-disk only if you edit and re-save them. ...


2

I like the broad hardware and OS support, nice license, and rapid update cycle, of VueScan - it runs on all the desktop machines in my home, and talks to all the scanners.


2

This is explained here but unless you really insist on building your own, I suggest you buy a slide-scanning attachment which is quite cheap. In either case you need a close-focusing lens. If you have a macro lens, then use it. Otherwise you will have to get macro focusing using another macro technique such as extension tubes. You will also need an even ...


2

Simply put: No. You don't really need to worry about dynamic range if you are planning to scan ordinary color negatives. A scanner's Dmax becomes a limiting factor only when scanning high-density transparency material like color-reversal films. In order to tell you why I have to clarify a couple of concepts. Film Density As you expose and develop a film, ...


1

Putting this in answer form only because it claimed my comment was too long.... You would have better luck with this question in Ubuntu's SE: http://askubuntu.com/ Your options will probably be limited but I wouldn't be surprised if there are a few open source solutions available outside of Ubuntu's Software Center. I've never dealt with the scanning of ...


1

There is a lot to be gained and a lot to be lost by passing via a scanner rather than an enlarger. If you have really to use a scanner (maybe you don't have a darkroom) you should make sure that you are doing your best to preserve information. This includes avoiding clipping and imposing a curve (that is, scanning directly to jpg) and making sure that you ...


1

A possible algorithm for better isolate the dust and scratches is explained in Comprehensive Solutions for Removal of Dust and Scratches from Images and in Manual Dirt/Scratch Removal Using Infrared Channel (archived version, text-only). The idea is to remove the shadow of the color information from the infrared image by using the red channel (the one with ...


1

FWIW, there is wider sleeving that will hold four strips of 3 6x7s, such as this sleeving material. If the scanner only detects the first two frames, then after you've scanned the first two frames, maybe you can insert the film upside-down to get the scanner to detect the last frame, then rotate that scan afterward.


1

Wasting a sleeve is the right way to go unfortunately. If you're extremely careful yes they will barely fit in as 3s, but I've found that they'll slip out one edge and damage your film if you breath wrong. Definitely do not go with an internegative (rephotographing your negatives) process, I'm not sure where that came from.


1

Having the same problem, I was thinking of buying a macro lens for my DSLR, making a simple device to hold the slide against a properly illuminated background and shooting with the remote control of the camera. This device should be a "drop-pick" type, where the slide does not need any enclosure, locking or adjustment. Once the tests are done, I hope I can "...


1

I have a Nikon Coolscan V ED 35mm film scanner myself, and have noticed that Nikon marketed a separate attachment gizmo for this model that allowed one to scan APS films (out of the box, the V handles 135-format only, either by filmstrip feeder or slide holder). So yes, there are solutions out there. The problem is that the Coolscan V is now out of ...


1

My conclusio after investigations and a lot of trying on my own is, that labs are using Software mostly set to auto-correct the image (e.g whitebalance, tinting). Thats why sometimes images of the same roll are looking different in color cast, depending on how "good" the Software was able to calculate whitebalance etc. Scanning cross processed film at home (...


1

I know exactly what I would do, and in fact have done in the past, but my answer is likely to be useless to anyone here. You'll have to be an image processing math freak. Like others say, scan at the highest res possible. I'd use high-power interactive math tools like Matlab or IDL to analyze the image into a high-frequency grainy part and a smooth part. ...


1

I bought the Canon Canoscan LiDE 210. I wanted a scanner that rapidly went through photographs from old photo albums but had better quality than the little 600 dpi autofeed jobs like the Kodaks (which are rapid and great, but low quality). Unfortunately, the Canon CanoScan is not the answer. It says it does 4800 dpi in 10 secs on the box, but in reality ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible