Orquid "Phoenix"

Orquid "Phoenix"

by ceinmart

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28

CIPA (the Camera & Imaging Products Association) has long established DSC as meaning Digital Still Camera. This prefix is not mandated by the DCF (Digital Camera Filesystem) standard but was adopted uniformly by Nikon and Fuji which named their files starting with DSC_, DSCN, or DSCF. Other manufactures went with PICT, PIC or P which presumable all stand ...


14

File naming is one of those things where everyone has a personal preference, but here are a couple things that folks do frequently: rename the files to include the original shooting date. So instead of IMG_0001.JPG you might end up with 20110214-0001.JPG include a short shoot description. Continuing my example, perhaps you'd have ...


12

This comes down to software patents — not on dates, but in a way that limits filenames. The only filesystem which is widely available and cross-platform is FAT, the venerable Microsoft DOS filesystem. It works on both old and new versions of Windows, worked on OS/2, works on Macs, works on Linux, and there are plenty of embedded implementations for the mini ...


10

Using the filename to get shutter count might be inaccurate because of previously stored photos. You can try using utilities like http://www.mydigitallife.info/2010/10/20/download-eosinfo-to-check-shutter-count-for-canon-dslr/ to get the real shutter count


7

The reason most cameras don't store files by data and time is simply because no one wrote the code in the camera's software to do so. One possible reason nobody wrote that code is that the date/time format is illegal according to the DCF standard that describes how cameras should store images for compatibility with other cameras, viewing devices and ...


7

According to Wikipedia, the Sony Cyber-shot cameras use the same prefix: All Cyber-shot models have a DSC prefix in their names, which is an acronym for "Digital Still Camera". I suspect Nikon adopted the same convention.


6

Honestly, folders are the way to. There are workarounds but do you really want 100,000 images in the same folder? It's going to take extremely long to open on some machines and hard to navigate when you have a tiny scrollbar and too many thumbnails being read or generated. You can all root them in one main folder: /Pictures And divide into subfolders: ...


6

One good way to handle this is to add a date/time into the file name. For instance: instead of IMG_1234.jpg, have the file renamed to IMG_YYYYMMDD_1234.jpg. That way if later down the road you have another IMG_1234.jpg, the exported versions would be dated. So if the images were shot on Feb. 14, 2010 and Jun. 30, 2011 you would end up with ...


5

I don't think there is a field in the metadata which explicity defines the crop aspect ratio, but there are plenty of other fields which you could use instead; e.g. 'Instructions' where you could manually add the aspect ratio. You can use 'Sync (metadata)' to apply a crop ratio to the relevant images to avoid typing it in more than once. Then just add ...


5

I can confirm that the EOS utility does import the duplicate files without any problems (and, as a side point, faster than Picasa too). For some reason the EOS utility is not on Canon's website and my CD is a few thousand miles away. Luckily I've found a workaround: Download EOS Utility updater from Canon's website Edit your registry (see below) to trick ...


5

Using exiftool, the answer is to create a user-defined tag based on EXIF:Model which filters out the offending characters. This question is asked and answered in the ExifTool forum: http://u88.n24.queensu.ca/exiftool/forum/index.php/topic,2961


4

A quick Google suggests that the 5D doesn't have an in-camera way to do this, but instead requires a post rename. Personally, I use Exiv2 to read the date+time from my EXIF metadata and prefix this to the filename, precisely to avoid any possibility of overlapping numbers. Here's the command I use to do that with: "\path\to\exiv2.exe" -k -v -r ...


3

I don't think you can on the Rebel series. The 7D got the option to set the prefix with a firmware update this summer, and I think it's been in the higher end models for a while. And I may be mistaken but I don't think the Magic Lantern firmware hack addresses this. But that's not the end of things. As part of my workflow, I use a script for reading files ...


3

I've been using jhead for this since before I was aware of this feature of ExifTool, and what I do is simply use a wrapper script to extract the model name to a temporary variable munge the name using a set of rules I've built up rename using that variable in the shell command line rather than the string codes for the rename tool itself This is a little ...


3

Most cameras increment the folder number when the photo number wraps round. I'm sure the 7D does this. The FAT32 filesystem used by the camera doesn't support multiple files with the same name unless they are in different folders. XP is fully compatible with FAT32 so if you plug the card in directly and it's on the card then you should be able to see it in ...


3

No. No it is not possible to change the file naming scheme on the D40. Very few cameras can do that but many importing software can rename on import. Lightroom for example gives you lots of choices such as sequential numbering, date-time, etc. PS: stackexchange software says that I should use 15 characters at least to say no :)


3

Page 162 in the manual. Go to the Custom Settings menu and change option d4, "File Number Sequence", to On. When this option is off, filenames are reset when you change exposure or reformat the card. With it on, they continue where you left off. An option to reset the count is also available in the same menu.


2

I'm glad it worked out for you. I'm not sure what exactly made it decide to continue from the number the third time — it's always creepy when software behaves non-deterministically. I know you said you didn't want to rename your old files, but I find it really convenient to do so. There are a number of free (open source and otherwise) cross-platform ...


2

Short answer: Yes you absolutely can add your own date format to the drop down list. Within your Lightroom program folder, go to the "Resources" folder and create a folder called "en." Then, create a file called "TranslatedStrings.txt." In that file, write the following line (including the quotes): ...


2

Almost but not quite. I'm assuming the last part of your YYYY/MM/YYYY-MM-DD is a folder name, not a filename (as I assume you take more than one photo a day :). If so, Lightroom's Import feature will get you most of the way there but not completely. To import those photos to Lightroom without moving or renaming them: Start in Lightroom's Library module. ...


2

Most likely the shutter count is due to factory testing as noted in a previous answer. The fact that the number is 256 actually leads me to believe this in part because it a power of two (2^8 = 256) and is also the the maximum number that you can store in a byte of data (eight bits) so you tend to see it in use a lot by developers and the like.


2

You can't do it in camera because it would be an exception to the DCIM naming standards which the camera follows. As far as after the fact, I use the multi-rename feature of Total Commander for my bulk file rename operations. It's technically a shareware product, so you can try it and use it for that for free. It's really worth buying though cause it is ...


2

Sadly, this seems to no longer be possible. Posting an answer with the workaround I'm going with, though, so I can "accept" something (because I don't quite want to go with the other answer that's been given yet - though it does present other viable workarounds that some could use, and I welcome other answers, if folks have them): Instead of doing a ...


2

I'm not sure it is possible to do exactly what you want formatting the card in camera without modifying the code in the camera's firmware, but here are two possible workarounds that might work for you. 1) To the best of my knowledge recent Canon DSLR bodies in the xD series starting with the 7D in 2009 allow the user to change the image name prefix. The ...


1

One thing you can do in-camera with Nikon cameras is to alter the 'IMG_' prefix. I have friends who shoot events with Nikon gear. Each one has changed the prefix to their initials. It makes it easy to identify which images belong to each shooter. If you could remember to manually change the prefix each time the image number reached 9999 you could continue ...


1

A donationware plug-in called LR/Transporter can do this according to its change log: Version 4.24, 20th September 2011 Added new tokens to retrieve the full path name of the original image files (only available on Lightroom 3 or higher). Many of you have been asking for this for years, but we've only just noticed that Lightroom 3 finally ...


1

You can change any of the default-Lightroom patterns to accomodate your desired folder structure. This will generate the folder structure and date pattern for you. You still need to rename the last folder to put in the shooting name. You need to change the file "TranslatedStrings.txt", which is located within the following path: (Lightroom 3) On Windows: ...


1

I'm starting to do something similar using keywords instead of repurposing an IPTC. Create a set of keywords for the formats ("crop_16_10", for instance), and then you can work off of that. Lightroom doesn't give ytou the ability to work with this data (or search on it. sigh). In general, I've found I'd rather create custom sets of keywords than "hack" the ...


1

I like a challenge! The only way I can find of doing this is as follows: Sort your collection by Rating, in Z-A order. Now export with a naming template something like this: {Image # (0001)»}-{Date (YYYYMMDD)»}-{Filename»} That should result in exactly what you're after.


1

As mentioned above, most DSLR shutters will work for 100,000s of shots, so even if the camera has been used for 3000 photos that is practically nothing. Most likely is that it's the lower number of 256, which would be about right for random product testing during manufacture. Some cameras do come with a fairly accurate shutter count utility, but these are ...



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