Not Your Everyday Banana

by Bart Arondson

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14

It depends. My last camera only connected at USB1.1 speeds, so was slower than using a USB2.0 card reader. However, if your camera can do USB2.0 or you have a USB1.1 or USB1.0 card reader, you wont see that benefit. You can get Firewire or ExpressCard card readers for CF cards, which are faster than USB2.0, (and I think generally limited by the speed of ...


13

It sounds like what you want is an Eye-Fi card. This will wirelessly transmit the photos you take as you walk round back to your PC. If you go for this option though you will need to use one of Canon's xxxxD or xxxD series cameras as it's SD Card only at the moment - no Compact Flash card option... (Thus, 7D / 5D series / 50D and before / 1D series can't ...


7

Using an 'eyefi' add in card would give you maximum flexibility in camera choice as the majority of cameras do not have integral WiFi and you are very greatly limiting your choice this way. HOWEVER Depending on application, an excellent sounding candidate is Ricoh's G700SE Ricoh G700SE home page Specifications Features page including - Despite ...


7

You must install EOS Utility to download pictures directly from the camera. Your computer will not recognize it as a generic drive. EOS Utility will also give you the ability to shoot tethered and control the camera from your computer. Your other option is to use a card reader instead.


6

TURN OFF WIFI. I struggled with this too but if you disable wifi and reconnect the USB you should be fine.


5

There are five possible methods that I can think of: Tethering to a Computer You can connect the camera to a computer via USB. However, this limits movement and can be inconvenient at times. This also requires specialized software. This is the cheapest option by far. You will still need a conection to the internet. An Eye-Fi card The second cheapest ...


5

This depends on a number of factors but, in general, it would be true. The primary reason is that many readers are not attached via USB and so are not limited by the speed of the USB bus and are also not sharing the bandwidth of the USB bus with other devices. However, if your CF reader is USB, it wouldn't likely be much faster, if at all. Anyways, it can be ...


5

Short answer: It Works Great I have regularly used an iPad as storage while on holiday, and it's worked fine. As far as I have been able to tell, it copies the whole RAW file over. I plug my 5D mkII into the iPad using the USB dongle. It also makes a great previewing device. Of course, I make sure I have 2 copies of everything, so I don't delete the ...


5

It sounds like you were shooting RAW images. These types of files are not directly viewable without special software that understands how your camera works and how to interpret the data from the sensor. They offer a lot of strengths over JPEG, such as being able to adjust white balance and recover from some over or under-exposure much more easily, however ...


5

The image was corrupted by random bytes of information being lost in the data transfer. You can tell because each time information is lost, the image shifts (because pixels end up missing as it fills each line). It's also not an even number of pixel information since some of the times that information is lost, it causes the color information to get shifted ...


4

I don't know of any, but you can get an EyeFi card for any rugged camera that takes SD. http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=eyefi


4

From reading http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/readflat.asp?forum=1034&message=38261447&changemode=1 and http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/readflat.asp?forum=1034&message=21930545&changemode=1 You will need to have Nikon's Transfer software or use View NX 2 UPDATE: As a side tip (maybe you already do this) but I never connect my DSLR to ...


4

There are a number of software programs that will handle tethered shooting: Lightroom 4, Phase One software's Capture One (which will also wireless transmit images to an iPad using Capture Pilot. These are full blown editing suites however. If you just want simple transfer, what about an Eye-Fi card? They have a direct mode which will send images ...


4

This is not a bug. On the Canon 6D, USB file transfer is disabled when Wi-Fi is enabled. Try disabling the Wi-Fi first. Good Luck!


4

Canon has a detailed manual available for the Wifi functionality of the 6D. You can both remotely operate the camera with EOS utility over Wifi and share photos with computers or smart phones. You can also do remote shooting from a smart phone.


3

Four main options exist: Cameras with built in Wi-Fi Use an Eye-Fi card Tether the camera to a computer that can upload the images Shoot with a camera that also has the ability to upload to Facebook, such as a smartphone camera Eye-Fi can in fact do this. They have a webpage dedicated to the functionality you are interested in here: ...


3

It sounds like MacOS is just creating a disk image file (.dmg I would guess) for the USB drive, which can then be mounted. I'm curious if you can actually clone an SD card, or just USB drives...SD/CF cards are usually treated differently than USB drives, and the MacOS clone feature is usually intended as a means of backing up literal external USB drives. ...


3

No, there are not any for the Rebel line. The EyeFi is your best option, and works well with the Rebels, especially the T1i, T2i and T3i. The newer EyeFi products support saving to mobile devices running iOS or Android, similar to the Canon wifi adapters pushing to FTP. It also can push video and RAW to your computer or to their servers. The biggest ...


3

Maybe. You can install a tethering app (Canon's EOS Utility included with your camera's software disc and free update downloads available from Canon is one such app) on anything that will run the correct OS. A small tablet or netbook running Windows, for instance, will let you connect the camera via a USB connection. Any Apple device that runs Mac OS X ...


3

Someone did this by putting a Raspberry pi into a 5Dmk2 battery grip, details here : http://www.davidhunt.ie/?p=2641 He uses gphoto on the Raspberry pi, according to gphoto's web site support of the original 5D is "Experimental" - so you can't know if this will work or not without trying.


3

If you are talking about JPEG files, then the utility jpeginfo is exactly what you're looking for. It can check files for different types of JPEG errors and corruption and either return an error code (the most useful thing for scripting), or just delete files with errors. I use this as part of my initial file transfer, to make sure everything copied okay ...


3

I have LR5 and just tried this and it didn't complain to me, but you could try this script provided by Adobe (for use with LR4, but maybe it still works).


2

If you don't want to drain your battery every-time you transfer the files from your camera, then you should use a card reader. Directly connecting your camera to the computer to transfer pictures, drastically drains the battery.


2

This is pretty cool if you happen to have a 7D.


2

The magic word is "tethered." Others have named some software that will do it, but anything that lets you shoot tethered will do it.


2

You'd need to use the USB dongle contained in Apple's Camera Connection Kit, in conjunction with a USB CF card reader, but the iPad will support RAW files, so I presume this means the photos will remain unchanged after transfer.


2

According to these forum posts, you have to copy the contents of the C:/Documents and Settings/Your_User_name/Application Data/OLYMPUS/Olympus_Master or C:/Users/Your_NAME/AppData/Local/OLYMPUS/OYMPUS_Data directory.


2

Another option is the JVC Addixxion, which was launched at the end of June. it's significantly waterproof, shockproof and will even broadcast live, via its inbuild wifi and a mobile hotspot to Ustream ! http://www.jvc.co.uk/article.php?id=100552


2

More information would be useful. What sort of computer and what operating system are you using? You may be a victim of the filing system type used on your camera card. If it is formatted with the FAT file system it would explain the problem. Even a FAT32 file system - which is commonly used on some cards, can enforce a 2 GB maximum file size if the ...


2

Excuse me if I'm far off, but when was the last time you updated your Mac through Software Update? Apple keeps releasing "Digital RAW Compatibility Updates" that add support for new cameras. The 7D got support in "Digital Camera RAW Compatibility Update 2.7." Check http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1475.



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