Spring 2012

Spring 2012
by ani

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14

It depends. My last camera only connected at USB1.1 speeds, so was slower than using a USB2.0 card reader. However, if your camera can do USB2.0 or you have a USB1.1 or USB1.0 card reader, you wont see that benefit. You can get Firewire or ExpressCard card readers for CF cards, which are faster than USB2.0, (and I think generally limited by the speed of ...


14

It sounds like what you want is an Eye-Fi card. This will wirelessly transmit the photos you take as you walk round back to your PC. If you go for this option though you will need to use one of Canon's xxxxD or xxxD series cameras as it's SD Card only at the moment - no Compact Flash card option... (Thus, 7D / 5D series / 50D and before / 1D series can't ...


13

TURN OFF WIFI. I struggled with this too but if you disable wifi and reconnect the USB you should be fine.


12

I have no idea why someone would recommend this. I suspect it is just superstition. There generally isn't anything important or useful to you outside of the DCIM folder, and you certainly don't get any benefit in copying that folder vs. copying its contents — your computer does the exact same thing either way. Canon's MISC folder is explained at What is ...


10

It is not possible to transfer images out of the memory card faster than its maximum read speed. All you need then is a sufficiently fast card reader. With USB 3.0, there is enough bandwidth to exceed the transfer speed of the fastest current Compact Flash and SDXC cards. Lexar claims 500 MB/s top speed which is faster than Gigabit Ethernet (1000 Mb/s = 128 ...


8

You need to install Canon's EOS Utility in order to download the pictures directly from the camera. Canon DSLR cameras do not appear as generic logical drives like some other manufacturers' DSLRs. EOS Utility is included on the disc that came with the camera. Updates are downloadable at Canon's website (under the software tab, rather than the drivers tab), ...


7

Using an 'eyefi' add in card would give you maximum flexibility in camera choice as the majority of cameras do not have integral WiFi and you are very greatly limiting your choice this way. HOWEVER Depending on application, an excellent sounding candidate is Ricoh's G700SE Ricoh G700SE home page Specifications Features page including - Despite ...


7

You must install EOS Utility to download pictures directly from the camera. Your computer will not recognize it as a generic drive. EOS Utility will also give you the ability to shoot tethered and control the camera from your computer. Your other option is to use a card reader instead.


6

If you are talking about JPEG files, then the utility jpeginfo is exactly what you're looking for. It can check files for different types of JPEG errors and corruption and either return an error code (the most useful thing for scripting), or just delete files with errors. I use this as part of my initial file transfer, to make sure everything copied okay ...


6

You could turn your device into a Wifi hotspot and then EyeFi can connect to the internet via your phone (or tablet). I don't have any experience with Eye Fi specifically, but presumably its programmed to scan for a list of known wifi hotspots. I would imagine you could program it to find your phone consistently and then once your device is enabled as a ...


6

Short Answer : you may be lucky ! As you supposed, it seems that you have indeed experienced some corruption(s) during the transfer. Technically speaking, a JPG is made of tiny blocks of pixels called "MCU block" (Minimum Coded Unit). In the case of your image, the MCU has the size of 16*8 pixels (regular sizes are 8*8, 8*16 and 16*8). As one can see in ...


5

This is not a bug. On the Canon 6D, USB file transfer is disabled when Wi-Fi is enabled. Try disabling the Wi-Fi first. Good Luck!


5

There are five possible methods that I can think of: Tethering to a Computer You can connect the camera to a computer via USB. However, this limits movement and can be inconvenient at times. This also requires specialized software. This is the cheapest option by far. You will still need a conection to the internet. An Eye-Fi card The second cheapest ...


5

Short answer: It Works Great I have regularly used an iPad as storage while on holiday, and it's worked fine. As far as I have been able to tell, it copies the whole RAW file over. I plug my 5D mkII into the iPad using the USB dongle. It also makes a great previewing device. Of course, I make sure I have 2 copies of everything, so I don't delete the ...


5

This depends on a number of factors but, in general, it would be true. The primary reason is that many readers are not attached via USB and so are not limited by the speed of the USB bus and are also not sharing the bandwidth of the USB bus with other devices. However, if your CF reader is USB, it wouldn't likely be much faster, if at all. Anyways, it can be ...


5

There are a number of software programs that will handle tethered shooting: Lightroom 4, Phase One software's Capture One (which will also wireless transmit images to an iPad using Capture Pilot. These are full blown editing suites however. If you just want simple transfer, what about an Eye-Fi card? They have a direct mode which will send images ...


5

Canon has a detailed manual available for the Wifi functionality of the 6D. You can both remotely operate the camera with EOS utility over Wifi and share photos with computers or smart phones. You can also do remote shooting from a smart phone.


5

It sounds like you were shooting RAW images. These types of files are not directly viewable without special software that understands how your camera works and how to interpret the data from the sensor. They offer a lot of strengths over JPEG, such as being able to adjust white balance and recover from some over or under-exposure much more easily, however ...


5

The image was corrupted by random bytes of information being lost in the data transfer. You can tell because each time information is lost, the image shifts (because pixels end up missing as it fills each line). It's also not an even number of pixel information since some of the times that information is lost, it causes the color information to get shifted ...


4

I don't know of any, but you can get an EyeFi card for any rugged camera that takes SD. http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=eyefi


4

From reading http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/readflat.asp?forum=1034&message=38261447&changemode=1 and http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/readflat.asp?forum=1034&message=21930545&changemode=1 You will need to have Nikon's Transfer software or use View NX 2 UPDATE: As a side tip (maybe you already do this) but I never connect my DSLR to ...


4

There is no quality loss. The displays are simply different hardware and calibrated differently. Mobile displays often over compensate in the areas you mentioned since they are viewed in poor conditions and also because most people like that, and are not setup for accurate work.


4

This is now fixed in one of the recent (this week)'s windows updates. Just do a Windows Update, restart your PC as prompted to ensure installation, and try again. You will see that the issue has now gone away. Many people, including me, are reporting this problem. See Window 10 and Nikon D7000 dslr on Microsoft's support forum. It appears to be a ...


4

The misc folder is for storing in camera data for everything other than the image data itself. IE, thumb nail metadata, temporary data and if you are printing directly from the camera, it stores the DPOF data( digital print order format). I personally don't need to copy this info, so I import just the images in Lightroom.


4

Many digital cameras now have built-in WiFi but it is usually tied to the application provided which may be upgraded from time to time. What I suggest doing, if you are looking for such a camera is look at these applications and then read the list of compatible cameras. Most such apps are on the Android store which makes them easy to find. For cameras that ...


3

Four main options exist: Cameras with built in Wi-Fi Use an Eye-Fi card Tether the camera to a computer that can upload the images Shoot with a camera that also has the ability to upload to Facebook, such as a smartphone camera Eye-Fi can in fact do this. They have a webpage dedicated to the functionality you are interested in here: http://www.eye.fi/...


3

It sounds like MacOS is just creating a disk image file (.dmg I would guess) for the USB drive, which can then be mounted. I'm curious if you can actually clone an SD card, or just USB drives...SD/CF cards are usually treated differently than USB drives, and the MacOS clone feature is usually intended as a means of backing up literal external USB drives. ...


3

No, there are not any for the Rebel line. The EyeFi is your best option, and works well with the Rebels, especially the T1i, T2i and T3i. The newer EyeFi products support saving to mobile devices running iOS or Android, similar to the Canon wifi adapters pushing to FTP. It also can push video and RAW to your computer or to their servers. The biggest ...


3

I did a quick google and found this: FAQ: Sending images to a computer (Wi-Fi function) (EOS 6D) which is a very detailed step by step procedure for transferring pics to a computer. But I also came across this post: 6D WIFI: how long for RAW transfer?(dpreview.com) which references The New Canon EOS 6D – Welcome to the Full-Frame Club! which says: ...


3

Maybe. You can install a tethering app (Canon's EOS Utility included with your camera's software disc and free update downloads available from Canon is one such app) on anything that will run the correct OS. A small tablet or netbook running Windows, for instance, will let you connect the camera via a USB connection. Any Apple device that runs Mac OS X (...



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