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19

I can't speak for Linux, but on Windows I've used the excellent "Recuva" product from Piriform to recover deleted files. Recommend giving that a go to see if the content is still retrievable and as Reid said - if there were more photos taken afterward then she's almost certainly up the creek.


14

Check out TestDisk or the associated PhotoRec tool from CGSecurity. TestDisk will allow you to scan the file system and look for deleted files. (See How to Undelete files with TestDisk.) Provided the data hasn't been overwritten it should be possible to recover the files. You can also use TestDisk to take an copy of the underlying file system to stop any ...


13

There are two utilities from CGSecurity that might help. TestDisk - Allows direct access to disk data and file recovery from corrupt partition tables. PhotoRec - Specifically targeted at recovering photos by identifying byte patterns in images (& video) files. Depending on what has caused your card to fail will depend on which of these tools will ...


12

What you have there is the thumbnail stored inside a normal EXIF JPEG file. The size 160×120 is a significant clue that this is where these thumbnails come in, because although I don't think the standard mandates a particular size, 160×120 is incredibly common. (My DSLR saves thumbnails that size, and in fact "letterboxes" the 3:2 images with black bars to ...


11

I successfully recovered all the files from a formatted card by copying it using dd and then using the sleuth kit under linux. Fortunately no pictures had been taken since the card was formatted. I used the fls and icat commands as described in test image results from Sleuthkit Informer Issue #14 and the TSK Tool Overview


6

There are two apps I have tried that worked for me: Ontrack EasyRecovery - Very good, comprehensive and reliable. Got me out of trouble more than once. Unfortunately a bit pricey. Windows only. The Lite version is good enough for you as it can recover up to 25 files. Sandisk RescuePRO - Not as comprehensive as EasyRecovery but gets the job done and is ...


6

Can you distinguish if it's the card that is inaccessible, or just it's filesystem? I know in Linux, you can access the raw device and try to get you data out of that (which should be possible, since it's usually just sequentially stored JPEG files). On Windows and Mac, you can try recovery software recommended by SanDisk, demo version which shows you what ...


4

I like PhotoRescue because I can start by doing a backup image of my card (useful if the card is close to dying) and then I can recover from the backup (faster because its on your hard drive). It also can recover video which some others can't do and it's super cheap.


4

Free, open source, cross-platform software PhotoRec can specifically recover many RAW formats, including Sony ARW (as well as Canon CR2, Nikon NEF, Pentax PEF, and others). Although the interface isn't particularly slick, the underlying functionality is the same as any proprietary program, and I'd be surprised if any of the more expensive options can ...


3

The D3100 has a "demo mode" which is mainly there so prospective buyers in shops can snap pictures and review them without having to insert cards. Page 147 of the manual says: Selecting "Enable release" allows the shutter to be released when no memory card is inserted, although no pictures will be recorded (they will however be displayed in the ...


3

Any general file recovery tool will do. For image-centric ones, there are also plenty available. The most popular ones are Image Rescue and Photo Rescue. They each offer a free-trial which shows you thumbnails and guarantee that anything that shows a thumbnail will be recovered once you pay. I can vouch that both of these work and I have seen them recover ...


3

This is a long shot, but if your JPEGs happen to be encoded in progressive mode, then you may be able to salvage a lower resolution version of your corrupted picture(s). Progressive JPEGs are encoded as several incremental "scans". The file begins with a scan that represents the whole image at a very low resolution, each successive scan builds on top of the ...


3

If the problem is with the huffman (this is the lossless part of the JPEG compression), then your chances of recovering the image information are really minimal. Huffman, like other forms of entropy coding, minimizes information redundancy in the data stream, ideally to the absolute minimum. This means that there are most likely no "other pieces" of the ...


2

When files are deleted, they are just left where they are, and the clusters are flagged as unused, so while the directory entries that contains the file name and start cluster are gone, most of the file data should be intact. There are several different programs that can undelete files, you should make a web search on "undelete files" and the file system of ...


2

The recovered images might be the thumbnails and not the actual images. Some of the image programs or browsers create the thumbnails from the actual images for displaying in the GUI. If you know any other attributes that might ascertain that the recovered image were, indeed, the actual images (location etc) then you may wish to investigate further.


2

If you are able to get to the card at all, you could try using Recuva from Piriform, Inc. It is a free download, and I have used it to get back files that were accidentally deleted. One of the features listed is: Recovery from damaged or formatted disks Even if you've formatted a drive so that it looks blank, Recuva can still find your files ...


2

You can try using chkdsk first to recover partition. I am assuming your card is FAT32 formatted. You can use following command on Windows Command Prompt (cmd): chkdsk g: /f /r /x Please note that you should write your memory card drive name instead of g: After chkdsk is completed and your drive is visible again, you should be able to recover your ...


2

As others have noted, you are seeing "thumbnails". The originals are very likely to be there and depending on what was done to the storage medium after the photos were written, some or all may be still recoverable. File recovery programs vary widely in capability. Some are fully free, some cost substantial money. I have found that the best free ones are ...


2

Moving the card between cameras is not likely to cause a problem. I think that's just a red herring. You might try some different recovery tool, but it seems likely that what you've gotten is as good as it's going to get. Time to get another card, and in the future remember to upload to a computer frequently and keep backups.


2

Not necessarily. If the format you are using makes use of compression, then different images of the same resolution can lead to different file sizes depending on how much variation it contains. For example, I've attached is a beautiful 500x500px image I knocked up in MS Paint which I saved in full resolution in both jpeg and bitmap formats. For comparison I ...


1

Dave Coffin, the author of the popular open source DCRAW conversion application (which powers several other RAW converters) has experience of Canon's RAW format, his website states "I do freelance consulting related to dcraw", see: http://www.cybercom.net/~dcoffin/dcraw/ Additionally on his main page he advertises general data recovery services: ...


1

I concur with the usage of PhotoRec however have you tried the most basic of using a different machine to see if the corruption is local specific? Also what are you opening the photos in? Do you have Photoshop or perhaps even GIMP to try and open them?


1

First things first: In any situation like this, Do not save any data to the card. This will significantly decrease your chance of recovering anything. Immediately flip the read-only tab on your memory card. Okay, then, with that out of the way, don't panic yet. All though bad cards happen frequently, there are many things that could go wrong that aren't ...


1

i have gone through this same fix once . The camera's demo mode saves its image to its internal storage.(not more than 10 photos)...... formatting or not formatting the memory card has no effect on the retrieval of the images. When you turn off the camera the images are lost forever.there is no scope of recovery. however i don not know if it is possible if ...


1

Do not format again or write anything to the card! This will only make recovery either more difficult or not possible at all. 1) There are many data recovery utilities available online. Be sure to download them through a reputable source such as download.com. You can search by OS and several other categories. You will probably find a utility that ...


1

The following is based on a large amount of personal experience. With memory cards almost anything conceivable can happen, and sometimes does. If there is an approved means of shutting down a memory card before removing it from the camera or computer AND you care enough, then you should use it. I almost invariably swap cards in both computer readers and in ...


1

I am not really familiar with your problem. But you could take out your memory card and try it on your computer with a Reader to see whether it is the same problem on your computer.If it is the same, and never save anything new on the memory card and then try a recovery program to help you.


1

What's the make of the card? did you buy from a reliable seller? Shady sellers use to play nasty tricks with the internal chips of the card (usually to cheat on the real size) and this has obviously nasty consequences on the integrity of the filesystem. Just in case, you should always download your pictures to a safe storage (move them away from the card as ...


1

I'm currently in the process of using ddrescue to recover photos from a corrupt CF card (I believe hardware failure). The problem I have is not only parts of the filesystem/files being unreadable, but when I attempt to read a specific part of the CF card, the disk stops responding entirely, which makes it quite difficult to import files off it. I imagine ...


1

As Simon wrote, photorec is a good tool to recover lost data, not only image files. I the past I recover jpg files with success, but it used signatures to find the files, and I don't know if it has signatures for raw files. Just a tip, first copy the content of the card with dd and the used photorec with the image created by dd. By making this one-time ...



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