Forgotten in its old age

by Aditya

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43

The key is adding some specific tags every time you import. I use Aperture (which is Mac-only,) but Lightroom has similar capabilities, as does iphoto. What you need to tag depends on what you shoot, and what you think you might be looking for someday, but this works for me: The people in the pictures. I use Apple's "Faces" feature to tag people in the ...


28

CIPA (the Camera & Imaging Products Association) has long established DSC as meaning Digital Still Camera. This prefix is not mandated by the DCF (Digital Camera Filesystem) standard but was adopted uniformly by Nikon and Fuji which named their files starting with DSC_, DSCN, or DSCF. Other manufactures went with PICT, PIC or P which presumable all stand ...


25

Adobe Lightroom is one application which a lot of professional photographers would use both for reviewing large quantities of images, and also for doing some initial post-processing. A lot of photographers these days find they rarely use Photoshop anymore, finding Lightroom very powerful in it's organising and post-process abilities. From it's conception, ...


16

Maybe Photoshop Lightroom is a good answer for this. Especially because of the tagging functionality...


15

For a free option, have a look at Google's Picasa. It allows you to sort your images via folders and tags, and easily upload them for sharing. It can be found here: http://picasa.google.com/ It also has rudimentary editing options, but I'd recommend Lightroom if you want a decent processing program. Conor's right, it's far from free at ~£250, but you can ...


14

Go to the Setup Menu (The one with the wrench icon) and set File Number Sequence to ON.


14

Using Adobe Camera RAW you are essentially just flipping switches that don't do much till you export the file to a format such as JPEG. Your original capture time, and the EXIF data associated with that original shot will not degrade due to you changing the EV value or similar. Changes made to the RAW file are completely non-destructive. The only thing ...


13

I'm a Mac user with Lr, and I have my files structured how I want (YYYY/MMM/DD/). What I would say, though, is download the free trials of both applications, as they're both workflow management tools and have a fair degree of structure which they impose on you, and see which one suits your workflow best. You can get the free trials from here and here for Lr ...


13

Aperture will allow you leave the files in your own folder structure. I can't compare it with Lightroom as I use Aperture exclusively. Aperture stores all the meta data on a photograph in an Aperture Library folder. By default it will import masters into the library. However, when importing you are offered the choice of: import masters into library; ...


13

My solution for this was to purchase Lightroom. My reasoning: Lightroom's workflow is an awesome solution for this problem. It's not too expensive (certainly not cheap either though). It's a one time cost that saves be a lot of time. Details... Lightroom allows you to run through and flag your images (Yes/No/Unflagged) using keyboard shortcuts, so I ...


13

Personally I would say no , do not import back into Lightroom. As you say - you have the originals. And Lightroom does show you by default the 'latest version', so effectively, what you have exported. Just with the option to go back, edit, change, etc.. What I do is have a Lightroom Exports folder with my exported JPG files. I do not clear this out ...


12

As a heavy Lightroom user, I can't recall any time where it has enforced any particular folder structure on disk. It has its own catalog where it stores metadata, original masters, and whatnot, but you can choose where to store that. When it comes to photos, I import wherever I choose. Particularly with Lightroom 3, you have some pretty rich options around ...


12

Adobe's XMP metadata standard supports information defined by the Metadata Working Group (MWG), which includes a definition of how to store face tagged data. See: Adobe XMP: http://www.adobe.com/products/xmp/standards.html MWG: http://www.metadataworkinggroup.com/ where you can click on the specifications, download the PDF, and then look at page 51 ...


12

Lightroom is the way to go. Download the trial and give it a try, though I do recommend reading a bit or watching a few videos first to get the most out of your trial. Lightroom will let you do whatever you wish on the file system side, and then offer flexibility beyond it. This is important, because this NAS won't be your last, and in fact, you may have ...


11

There is not. IPTC, another image metadata standard, also does not contain a "People" field. There's a Contact field, but that is used for contact information for the photographer. Most people I know will store people as keywords. The main debate is whether or not to include spaces (would a photo of me be tagged as aaronhockley or as "aaron hockley"?). ...


11

It doesn't make a lot of sense to organize photos by something that is already in the EXIF data, like the date the photos were taken. I organize my photos in folders by event/location. The most important thing is to make sure you tag as much as possible when you import. The chances of going back later to tag are basically nil, so you need to make sure to do ...


11

I'm a fan of Adobe Lightroom - its way of working seems to fit my mental model so I find it fairly natural to use. That does depend on you tagging the photos with appropriate metadata of course and not everyone thinks the same as me, so you may not get on with it. Picasa has matured nicely over the years and has a nice "face finder" that does a pretty ...


10

If you don't want to pay for Adobe Lightroom or Apple Aperture, you could go with Apple's iPhoto or Google's Picasa. I'm most familiar with iPhoto; it does a fair amount of hand-holding when it comes to organizing photos. Smart Albums are really nice; you write the filter logic, and iPhoto shows you the matching photos on an ongoing basis. Works wonders for ...


7

I've been using Picasa version 3.6. In addition to tags and geo-tagging, it also recognizes (some) faces and can attach "name tags" to photos. I use separate folders for the date the photo was taken grouped by months and years, e.g. Photos\2010\07\0720. Picasa orders the pictures by folder and date, or album and I can also search by tag, person, or ...


7

Flickr does allow a collection to contain either sets, or other collections, giving you that hierarchy


7

Unfortunately I had the exact opposite criteria as you :) I looked at every software I could which did NOT touch the files and stored the information in a central database. The one constant is that having a central database makes it much more efficient to perform searches and filter your images. I do have hundreds of gigs of photos and the most efficient ...


7

According to Wikipedia, the Sony Cyber-shot cameras use the same prefix: All Cyber-shot models have a DSC prefix in their names, which is an acronym for "Digital Still Camera". I suspect Nikon adopted the same convention.


7

No. it will not damage your card or camera. The worst case scenario is that the camera would stop reading the card and the solution is to copy anything important on the card to your computer and format the card in camera. I've been doing this for years with lots of different cameras and never had any problem.


7

I used Picasa from Google for quite a while before deciding to move to Lightroom. It's free. Good tagging options Decent editing options (but really only for basic editing)


6

Well, actually most photo editors can't do it. The category of software you are looking for is called digital asset management (DAM) software. There are review of 5 popular options here: http://www.neocamera.com/article.php?id=dam-software If simple and fast is your criteria, then I suggest you look at PicaJet FX. It is available for Windows for $60. You ...


6

Yes you can preserve your directory structures in Lightroom, even though it is database driven. You can actually make it more robust by relying on keywords and renaming patterns to let Lightroom create reasonable and predictable directory structures. Here is a real world example; it is a bit arbitrary but works for me as a hybrid between a keyword-based and ...


6

First of all, you will save a lot of effort by adopting a software that includes worflow management and Digital Asset Management. Aperture, Lightroom, or even Adobe Bridge to name a few. This is a bit arbitrary but works for me as a hybrid between a keyword-based and a directory-based workflow management. I use a very specific directory structure explained ...


6

I don't think there is ... you can take a look at the EXIF specifications at http://www.exif.org or http://www.jeita.or.jp/cgi-bin/standard_e/pdfpage.cgi?jk_n=47 EXIF is a technical standard for images files ... not the content / subject of the image.


6

In the Linux world Shotwell, though still new, shows a great deal of promise as a photo collection organiser. It is quick, intuitive, powerful yet simple to use. It provides essential post-processing tools and when those are not enough can call Gimp. Shotwell web site


6

If you have a Mac, you should consider Apple's Aperture. It's a fully featured workflow program that simplifies importing, tagging, organising, processing and publishing. It's often compared to Lightroom, and is significantly cheaper if you buy it using the Mac App Store - currently $79.99 compared with over $200 for Lightroom. It's also generally ...



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