Lightnings taking a ride

by ceinmart

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0

Since you only have a black and white JPG there is no "color" information there. There is only shades of gray, "color" is lost. There is no 100% automated process to do this for you, you ll have to use a software to perform something like this: To perform digital colorization, a digitized copy of the best monochrome film print available is needed. ...


14

If this image were RAW, the color might still be there. But since it is JPEG, I'm afraid not. The fact that the image is in RGB format does not help, because I'd you look, you will find that in fact for each pixel, each of these values is set to the same thing: (0,0,0), (37,37,37), (221,221,221), or whatever. That is, they're all gray levels, just ...


6

Unfortunately, a JPEG is a one-way, destructive process. It may be RGB, but it no longer contains the colors originally present, only those written in the B&W conversion process. If you had the RAW (.CR2) file, however, you could recover the colors. Think of the RAW file as a master, and JPEGs are created from that.


0

Some folks have reported similar issues with D700's and fixed by going into the shooting menu, and creating a new active folder, then formatting the card. See 9th response in this forum thread


0

The D300s 1.01 supposedly had a software update that allowed it to use cards up to 64GB. I'm not sure whether or not the update was also available for the D300. Many users have reported problems with using larger size cards. A good way to solve the problem is generally to format the card in the camera. Or perform a Low-Level format which will reset the card ...


0

As everyone has noted, the file tyoe is not sufficient information. Find out resolution color space And the more varied details that could be a TIFF, e.g. if it's made for printing press then it could be CMYK set up for whst publishers want; color model (rgb? Cmyk?) bits per sample Also, if the jpeg is "just" the same file exported, it can still ...


2

I will start by a parallel with printing photos. Having a resolution of 300 ppi (pixels per inch) is relatively standard. It means that 300 pixels of a digital picture will be printed on one inch. It is common to assume that details are conserved with this resolution. So if the original painting is about 30*21 inch (like the Mona Lisa), you will need the ...


0

JPEG is a "lossy" compressed format, and it depends if the image is very homogeneous or not, very homogeneous images have a large compression factor meanwhile non-homogeneous images have a small compression factor. On the other hand TIFF is almost always used as a lossless format.


1

From the info you are providing there is no way to know. Some hints There is no way of knowing the resolution from the file size. Presumably both files have the same resolution (width x height), they are just delivered in different file formats. A high quality JPEG file has a very low information loss, (less than 0.4% compared to the uncompressed 24 bit ...


0

This is impossible. The most basic way to 'zoom' in on a picture is to display it on a huge screen, like a TV. That will already zoom the picture several times larger, and you cannot stop that.


6

This isn't possible, because computers do not work like this. Once someone has the data, they can generally do whatever they want with it. Now, it is certainly the case that big media companies would like to cripple computers so this isn't true, by introducing DRM — "digital rights management", where the "rights" are really "restrictions". This is used for ...


1

There is no common file format, that is able to prevent zooming. Your only option is to decrease the resolution so far, that the details you don't want to show get lost.



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