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52

The JPEG format has the advantage of giving small files. The RAW formats have the advantage of preserving all the data collected at the shot. The PNG format gives neither of these advantages, so you don't even get a compromise between the other formats, you get almost only the drawbacks from both formats.


39

Image size notes aside, a big reason is that PNG does not have a standardized means of EXIF embedding and that will immediately shy the camera makers away from it. There would be a lot of information lost by doing image conversion to PNG in camera as a result and, for the most part, would probably been seen as a negative by most photographers.


24

PNG may use a lossless compression algorithm, but it is lossy in comparison to the raw data. You lose bit depth, the camera may introduce demosaicing artifacts, you may bake in a bad color balance, the camera may apply inappropriate sharpening, the in-camera noise reduction may wash out detail, etc. I don't think there's a big demand for a format that's as ...


23

Having finished scanning 40 year old film I can assure you that you need to think longer term than 10 years, in fact at least 40 years. To know whether there is an answer one must understand the problem. These things can happen: proprietary software makers stop supporting old formats, very possible after 40 years. proprietary operating systems stop ...


23

Storing images as TIFF files is very space inefficient compared with raw, as TIFF images store three colours per pixel (at 8 or 16 bits per colour component, 24 or 48 total) compared to raw which just has the monochrome sensor data at 12 or 14 bits per pixel total. This monochrome data is interpolated into colour by exploiting the RGB colour filters placed ...


17

The entire point of raw files is to save the full unprocessed output of the sensor, there are no programs that edit raw files because if you do any editing it's no longer the raw output and you are better off generating a TIFF from the raw and editing that. A note about resizing - most camera sensors have a pattern of red, green and blue pixels, where each ...


17

JPEG 2000 has not garnered wide acceptance due to a few factors. Lacking backwards compatibility to JPEG Lack of wide browser support Questionable legal status (Only) 20% higher performance, while considering how inexpensive storage is Additional processing power/time needed to create JPEG already considered quite good Amount of rework to the code in ...


17

The short answer is: save it as a TIFF. PSD may once have been considered the more "native"/modern Photoshop format, but no longer. Jeff Schewe (the Photoshop Guru's Guru) advised way back in August 2007 on the Luminous Landscape forums that choosing TIFF over PSD was his strong recommendation. I quote: Look, I'll make it REAL simple... TIFF = ...


17

I suspect the answer here is that the format is written as "RAW" to match other common file format names which are acronyms such as JPEG, GIF, MOV, MPEG, etc. Nikon, Canon, Pentax, Hasselblad, Olympus, Sony, and many other manufacturers all write the format in all caps, so at this point it's a de facto standard. There is a distinction to be made between a ...


16

Pentax D645 K-x K-r K-5 K-5 II K-7 K-30 K-50 K-500 K-3 Q Q10 K-01 MX-1 K10D (u) K20D (u) K200D (u) K2000 (u) Models marked with (u) do not support creating compressed DNGs. These older cameras create DNGs that are larger than the equivalent Pentax-proprietary PEF raw files.


16

You can't resize RAW files per se. You can crop them in a RAW editor like Adobe Camera RAW, and the crop information will be stored in the sidecar XMP file, but the RAW file itself remains the same. This depends on your editor, but generally when you 'edit' a RAW file you are just storing settings in a 'sidecar' file. When you re-open the RAW file, the ...


16

Raw files are an intermediate format. It's essentially the unmodified sensor data (often in Bayer pattern), packaged with a bunch of metadata about the shot as well as a JPEG preview (for quick viewing). The data is both losslessly compressed and of a higher bit depth than that of JPEG. You only need to shoot raw if you wish to develop the photos into ...


14

JPEG actually uses two types of compression, a lossly and a lossless one. Lossless compression doesn't cause artifacts, so we can ignore that part. The particular type of lossy compression in JPEG, called a discrete cosine transform for the math knurds, allows a tradeoff between compression ratio and fidelity. Most software sufaces this as a "quality" ...


14

Noting other answers, and having had a bridge camera that did TIFFs, I'd suggest that for DSLRs TIFF is pointless except as an add on if it can be managed. TIFF is a lossless way of saving an image, once an image is generated, BUT the image that it saves is an interpretation of what the sensor records. RAW gives you the maximum possible flexibility ...


13

There are a lot of different RAW file formats, not compatible with each other. The Wikipedia page has a list of them. Some manufacturers have used more than one format. There are some things they tend to have in common. Most of them are based on the TIFF file format. The TIFF file format can contain various types of image data and metadata. ...


13

You explicitly mentioned PNG-24 - that has eight bits per channel, whereas a TIFF file can have 16. That would be one reason the quality could be higher, from a RAW conversion especially but also if you are doing a lot of editing. The PNG standard also supports 16-bits per channel (PNG-48) but I don't know how many applications support that, whereas pretty ...


13

An example Using the current photo of the week image. This is the high-quality JPEG: re-saved in Gimp with JPEG quality 80 (low); please note the general loss of sharpness, "dots" around high-contrast edges, loss of detail in low-contrast areas: and re-saved in GIMP with JPEG quality 30 (very low); please note evident 8x8 blocks and severe loss of ...


12

These two formats are different: JPEG general info JPEG is used to store images on smaller disk space JPEG compression algorithm changes image data while converting it. Amount of change can be controlled but not its location which is always around sharp colour changes JPEG is primarily an RGB format If you'd be saving and opening the same image several ...


12

I would say TIFF is probably the best format. JPEG 2000, like JPEG, is still a lossy compressed format when you really try to save space (the lossless version can compress a bit, but not nearly as much as the lossy form, and some forms of the "lossless" wavelet compression still can't fully reproduce the exact original image.) When scanning in an original ...


11

Your answer can be found at this forum site, but the short is, you will lose some EXIF information, the lens id in particular, but the normal EXIF will be there (IE, aperture, focal length, exposure time, flash firing).


10

DNG can be a rather complex beast. The file format is similar to TIFF, in that it is not specifically an image format itself, but more of a container. A "normal" DNG image will store metadata, the primary image in TIFF format, and possibly a thumbnail image. Depending on how DNG is used by any given program, the reality may differ. It is possible to store ...


10

Ricoh supports DNG in the Ricoh Digital GR, considered a professional compact, the Ricoh Caplio GX100 the Ricoh GR Digital series


10

I think you are most definitely missing something. Consider: JPG is used to store (and usually compress, lossy) images. Any image. What is an image? It is a great big bundle of pixels, when all is said and done. The output from the camera sensor is a great big bundle of pixels, too. They just happen not to be full-colour RGB pixels, they are monochrome ...


10

Take a look at Why don't most cameras support PNG format? for some other answers. Often cited reason is that the usual metadata (IPTC and EXIF of TIFF and JPG) is not very well supported by PNG and the software. PNG does support color profiles now, but it does not offer CMYK as TIFF does, because it is focused on web-usage. Anecdotal: I used to store ...


9

While TIFF is technically 'better' in that it is lossless, if you use high-quality JPEGs you will save yourself a lot of memory issues and you will probably not notice the difference in final quality. It may be worth checking with your print company to see what they recommend.


9

JPG compression is done in blocks of pixels. In a highly compressed JPG image the edges of those blocks can be seen: in the original image two pixels may have been very close in brightness and color, but if they are in different blocks, then after compression and decompression (when viewed) each of their values may differ from the original, so you lose ...


9

In general, RAW file converters, including Photoshop, will only open RAW files from camera models they know about. There's nothing special about the 60D to 70D transition here; you don't say which version of Photoshop your friend has, but presumably it's not the latest, which does support the 70D. However, that only answers half the question: why do the RAW ...


8

Adobe's Digital Negative format is an attempt to create a free open "universal" format explicitly to solve the issue of long term digital archiving. It is used natively by some cameras but not yet by the big two (Nikon/Canon). It is however easy to convert from Nikon/Canon Raw to DNG. It make take a little more time to see if DNG will gain traction in the ...


8

You missed some Casio models: FH100 & FH25 For a list of current DNG supporting cameras, it is any easy search on Neocamera, just select the DNG check box. Here are the results.


8

If you are saving to JPEG after processing check your compression settings. File size can climb astonishingly high the closer you get to 100% quality without any noticeable difference in quality. Dropping it down to around 90% can cut file size quite a bit.



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