High Falls, Pigeon River

by Jakub

submit your photo

Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged


I made this a public wiki so we can keep a master list Work from a printed checklist. Especially with gathering all the raw-material images, make sure you get everything. Shoot the model with a mild telephoto lens even if you want wide-angle overall, and composite. Shoot to plan on compositing: shallow DoF makes it easy to use select in focus in ...


This is another of those cases where the real answer is a lot more complicated than telling you a lens to buy. Fashion photography in particular is very strongly about staging. Even if you're using natural light, you will need to learn to understand and control that light. For many beginners, bad experience with cheap on-camera flash drives an aversion to ...


Two reasons that jumps right out at me are size and weight. A 70-200 is pretty big, especially with a hood. To a new model, I bet it's downright intimidating. Hold that 70-200 for long, and you'll start to feel it in your hand and wrist, too. An 85mm easily solves both of those problems, assuming you want to shoot at 85.


Those two good lenses will handle the resolution, once stopped down to an optimal aperture. This is around F/5.6 on the Nikkor and F/4 on the Zeiss. Do test it out before going to your shoot. 2 stop down from wide-open is a rule-of-thumb, many quality lenses need less. The most important for your close up shots though is the magnification as you will lose ...


You need not worry; most lenses are up to the task. Some lenses are better than others, generally you get what you pay for. Every lens is afflicted with defects that force substandard results. There are seven major defects that result in substandard performance. Spherical Aberration Coma Aberration Astigmatism Curvature of field Distortion Longitudinal ...


No, it is pretty much the other way around... can the camera sensor resolve the lens detail? Digital cameras have always had anti-aliasing filters because they simply cannot resolve the finest detail from the lens. They suffer moire if the sampling is not AT LEAST double the detail level (Nyquist), which it has not been... so the cameras have required AA ...


What lens you chose really depends on two things; what composition you desire and the space you have to shoot in. I can't tell you the answer to either. Since you have a bit of time to adjust your shot before the guests arrive I think that the best answer is to simply take advantage of that. Bring a friend along who can stand in position and try out your ...


Primes nearly always outperform zooms for distortion and sharpness at a given focal point as their construction is generally simpler with fewer optical elements in the light path. Zooms are, by nature, compromised as they have to be able to provide different focal lengths with as low distortion as possible, and this entails some fairly complex optical ...


A "cookie-cutter" lens for beginning would be a 35/1.8 in my opinion. It is not really expensive and it is more versatile than a 50 mm lens on an APS-C sensor. Once you are comfortable, I'd say you should buy a zoom lens, in order to have more possibilities with the background of the model.


the creases and texture of the dress are not visible If you want to emphasize folds and texture, you need shadows. Think about a brick wall -- if you shoot it with very soft light, or with light coming from the direction of the camera, the wall will look very flat. If you shoot it with very directional light coming from the side, every little bump on ...

Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible