Napioa - Wind Origins

Napioa - Wind Origins
by octopus                

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9

I can think of several ways you could use it... backdrop: If the creative directory wants two looks with the same model in the same clothes, shooting both at the same time could save some time. Just because you're on a beach doesn't mean that every shot has to include the beach. lighting modifier: Shooting with the screen out of view but close to the model ...


5

There are a few ways to deal with moiré and none of them is a guarantee in every situation: Moiré adjustment tool/brush/filter in your post processing tool(or manual techniques with similar impact, manually blur areas of the image with moiré) Stop down your aperture to introduce diffraction Use a higher resolution sensor Have the model use a different ...


3

Those two good lenses will handle the resolution, once stopped down to an optimal aperture. This is around F/5.6 on the Nikkor and F/4 on the Zeiss. Do test it out before going to your shoot. 2 stop down from wide-open is a rule-of-thumb, many quality lenses need less. The most important for your close up shots though is the magnification as you will lose ...


2

As much as I want to mention the Jarvie window technique, I have to concede that basically it is macro shooting; fisheye lens, very close distance to subject (a foot or less from the lens). It's just a distorted or effect portrait, but it has lots of the normal macro characteristics. Other than the Jarvie window technique, I've seen several professional ...


2

You need not worry; most lenses are up to the task. Some lenses are better than others, generally you get what you pay for. Every lens is afflicted with defects that force substandard results. There are seven major defects that result in substandard performance. Spherical Aberration Coma Aberration Astigmatism Curvature of field Distortion Longitudinal ...


2

This look is primarily about the choice of lighting. Compared to typical headshots and family portraits the light here is very 'hard.' What that means is that the photographer has chosen a small light source that casts very crisp shadows. You can see this by looking at how sharp the shadow cast from his arm onto his jacket is. Larger light sources like soft ...


2

The saturation looks to be decreased a bit, but I don't think low saturation is the right description. There's plenty of color here even if they're not especially bright shades. If saturation were increased more than a little, the model would look oddly orange: In a truly low saturation image he would look more washed out: I think some of the keys here ...


2

My guess is that the ring light you saw on that TV show was just being used as a prop and the actor "photographer" had no idea what a ring light is used for. Yes, it is reasonable to use a ring flash or ring light for non-Macro photography. It is a realistic thing to see from a Pro but only in some situations. Many Pro's use ring lights for fashion ...


1

That's the reason: to shoot a fashon runway performance. This is event photography. This is not a studio. You have models running around, an audience that watches them, etc. One rule of thumb in event photography is: The photographer doing his/her job is not really part of the show. You should not get in the way of what's happening. For normal ...


1

No, it is pretty much the other way around... can the camera sensor resolve the lens detail? Digital cameras have always had anti-aliasing filters because they simply cannot resolve the finest detail from the lens. They suffer moire if the sampling is not AT LEAST double the detail level (Nyquist), which it has not been... so the cameras have required AA ...



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