Not Your Everyday Banana

by Bart Arondson

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12

The practical answer to your question is to find some female friend to photograph in that same location first, perhaps reading some tips online about photographing models. Then you can see what works with lights, what poses look good, and practice asking for poses. Also when you go out with the "real" model it would probably be good to take the same female ...


10

One of the photos has been flipped horizontally (see how the ends of blouse collar fold over each other). The shadows reveal that the camera was on its side, and pop-up flash was used. Probably on left side (so the picture on the right is flipped), because you'd need additional support under lens and it'd be awkward to reach shutter the other way. A short ...


9

The easiest way I can think of to emulate a shot like this is to do the following: Put the camera on a tripod to minimize any inadvertent movement during the shoot. Choose a high enough f-stop that you can be assured of a crisp image throughout the depth of field. Use autofocus to set the focus with the lights on. Switch to manual focus Turn the lights ...


7

One of the best things you could do is look at lots of fashion photos. Figure out what they're doing with framing and composition, what they're using to light the scene, be it flashes, soft boxes, natural light, look at how they've processed the image. The colours, the retouching etc. I know that this form of learning works for me. Inspired and learnt from ...


5

Without knowing all of the details or seeing examples of the problems, here are a few thoughts that come to mind: You noted the models were moving, so you'll want to use the Continuous Focus mode (Nikon's term - Canon calls this AI-Servo). Once the camera obtains focus on a subject it will attempt to "follow" that subject and make focus adjustments so ...


5

Since it is not clear which part of the look you want to recreate... First, you need to shoot with a shallow depth of field (as already mentioned), and at 50mm to 85mm. A prime lens will work best, but just keep your aperture as low as it can get in the lens you have. That will give you the general feel. In terms of processing, there are a few things going ...


4

it's not a necessary step at all but it is popular especially on pictures of women and especially for lifestyle and fashion shots as it covers up wrinkles and bad skin. you're right though - it can be overdone to an extent that the skin looks flat. i think in portraiture a little glow is good though as it does glamourise the shot.


4

It's much easier to get a realistic looking background in camera. It's much easier to get a nice looking background in Photoshop. Some people's philosophy is to do as much as possible in camera and leave Photoshop out of the equation or only only as a last resort. Some people's philosophy is to get the highest quality results possible using whatever tools ...


4

I was looking for something similar, and found this: http://www.jakprints.com/all-over-shirt-printing/ I haven't used them, so I can't recommend them. But they do look interesting. When you are looking, use the term "all over printing".


4

Fashion For Walls Similar photos have been done before such as by the ad agency TBWA for the "Fashion for Walls" campaign. In this case they used a combination of a real model, and a mannequin was switched out, and then they threw paint buckets at the mannequin. Then in post production the two were combined. I wouldn't say that these photos don't "involve ...


3

If you want the sharpest result, get the 24-70f/2.8 II or the 70-200f/2.8 IS II (whichever is appropriate for your needs). They are the two sharpest zoom lenses Canon has ever made and are possibly two of the sharpest zoom lenses in the world right now. I own both and have found them to both perform exceptionally. If cost is a factor, you could consider ...


3

It is not required to take your professional further. What will take your career farther is a happy client. A good deal of blemish/wrinkles etc. can be taking care of by lighting direction and quality. However, pride is a big part of photography and if your subject wants wrinkles to disappear, then away they go. I try to take care of this in a client ...


3

Depends on the specific problems you've had, but a few suggestions: Shoot in manual mode. The models are probably far better lit than the background, so depending on your framing your exposure will change with every shot and you'll have to do something different in post-processing for each. Easier just to look after it yourself. Aim for 1/250th. Don't ...


3

I've read that for fashion photography, natural light is important to make bright, colorful and clear pictures. You shoudn't focus too much on making the model do various poses, but rather on getting a shot from a great angle. Note that in contrast to portrait photography, fashion photography tends to require photos of the entire model, rather than just the ...


2

Most effective way of getting no shadows with a single light would be be with ring light around your lens. I'm assuming it's a speedlight, in which case you could add a DIY Ring Flash Kit to your light for this purpose. Or, you could turn the part of corridor behind your back into a huge ring flash by pointing flash on-axis in opposite direction of the ...


2

Use manual focus. Use high ISO (or add noise in PP) Underexpose a bit. Might try cross processing effects, or else play with white balance. The colours look a bit orange to me. If your flash doesn't produce the circular vignette, fashion a "snoot" out of rolled up paper, Pringles tube etc and fire flash through that


2

Don't forget that a lot of models are shooting TFP - time for prints. On their end they need shots that compete with all of the other models in portfolios, who have had such smoothing applied... Like you, I think most softening is overdone. I like to apply a light amount of softening so generally smooth out small imperfections while leaving overall ...


2

It's certainly the fastest way to hide blemishes and make skin look smoother, but overdone it does make it look flat. Personally, I'm not a big fan of the look, but I think expediency might be part of it. It is a lot more difficult to go in and fix blemishes by hand while maintaining the detail level without making it obvious that manipulations were made. ...


2

Without knowing for sure of course, but it looks like the D&G shoot used at least a large soft box to the upper left of frame. I say large because the shadows are fairly soft and there is a lot of fairly even lighting on the subjects. The photos you received look to be set up the same, only with a smaller light source. You can observe this by noting ...


2

A lot depends on which 24-70mm f/2.8 lens you are comparing to the EF 24-405mm f/4 L IS. There are three very good 24-70mm f/2.8 lenses you could consider: Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8 L II This lens is the most expensive at a little over $2,000 U.S., but is the sharpest from 24mm all the way to 70mm at f/2.8. But at the wide end where you want to use it there ...


1

What 24-70? I or II? To be honest, both lenses are good, both have strengths and weaknesses - in the end, you trade a wider aperture for IS or IS for a wider aperture. When I got my 5D MK II I had a similar issue - get the 24-70 f2.8 L (v1) or the 24-105 f4 IS L as a kit lens - I went for the 24-70. My reasoning is that you can simulate IS (with a tripod) ...


1

If you are serious about fashion work you need a set of fast primes, not an f/4 or slower zoom. Although the example you linked to is impressive considering it was taken using an f/4 zoom, it is probably not quite good enough for commercial use. Depending on what focal lengths you plan to work at you can go for any of the following focal lengths. 35mm, ...


1

Portability and those shots don't go well together. They are using a single strong key light in front that is coming from a large area (using a soft box most likely) to generate soft but dark shadows on the backdrop. They are also using a hard backlight that is strongly off to the side and almost functioning as more of a side fill. Look at the feet in the ...


1

Continuous can be easier to start with as you don't have any issues with triggering and syncing, and you get instant feedback as you can see the effect of the light as you move it. Strobes have the advantage of being able to overpower your ambient light so you don't have to work in the dark. They also don't get as hot as they are only on momentarily. You ...


1

I would use a 50 on your crop sensor cameras, it will give you a good position and good range to get a variety of shots from different distances as the model walks. The 50mm will in fact be around 70mm on your camera. The 35mm has some level of distortion compared to the 50mm so if you are not prepared to adjust this afterwards somehow then a 50 would be ...


1

On a APS-C Camera (as your Nikons are) I would recommend you 35mm (KB 56mm) if you want to have a "normal" (like eyes see) looking image. With 50mm (KB mm) you will get a light tele-zoom effect. On full-frame camera take 50mm.


1

Learning to give your clients what they want is key in any business. Even if as the one producing it you think it's a load of rubbish. As a hobby, not so much - you're producing what you want and to hell with anyone else! Airbrushing has been around since photography and although there are plenty of other fads which produce rubbish images that people ...



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