Orquid "Phoenix"

Orquid "Phoenix"

by ceinmart

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

21

They're a tube that fits between the lens and camera body to help with macro photography. its sole purpose is to move the lens farther from the image plane. The farther away the lens is, the closer the focus, the greater the magnification There is also loss of light so your aperture and/or exposure time will be affected. You can buy ones specific to ...


13

As far as I know there should be no real difference. The extension tube have no lens elements but is merely (as the name suggests) a tube. The Kenko extension tubes feature the same electrical connections as the Canon one (judging from reviews and images on the net). According to this review, there are two versions of the Kenko tubes; an older one that is ...


11

Macro extension tubes. Get the Kenkos, they have no optical element so there's no sense in shelling out for the Canons. You can only get so close up with the 100 f/2.8 though, if you want to get even closer, you'll need to swap your lens in for a 180mm f/3.5L macro and, ultimately, an MP-E. Don't use macro filters, they degrade the image quality.


10

as others have noted you lose light but with extension tubes you gain versatility that is sometimes not available with a EF 100. I have a EF70-200/2.8 that I use with extension tubes (kenko 12mm, 20mm, 36mm) especially for taking photos of insects. the Minimum Working Distance from the front of the lens to the subject with the lens zoomed to 200mm: 58cm ...


10

I do believe there are some formulas you can use. To Matt Grum's point, I have not tested these with zoom lenses, and to my current knowledge, they apply only to prime (fixed focal length) lenses. You did not specifically specify zoom lenses, so... The simplest way to calculate the magnification of a lens is via the following formula: Magnification = ...


10

I'll just take this out into an actual answer, and the answer is 'NO', the crop factor doesn't make it a 1.5:1 ratio. What it does change is the ratio of information per pixel which would be an valid new designation. Why? Because the 1:1 ratio is a designation of how large the lens renders subjects on the focal plane whatever that plane is, it is an ...


9

I guess the answer is yes and no. Technically speaking, the image circle projected by the lens is 1:1, and your sensor is capturing a smaller part of the center of that circle...cropping it. This fits with the formula for magnification: M = (di - f) / f Where di is the distance from the lens to the sensor, and f is the focal length. Crop factor or ...


9

First of all, I think your quest to avoid macro lenses is misguided. The simple fact is, a true macro lens will be sharper, more versatile, and easier to handle than any of the alternatives to that. Either way, however, autofocus when dealing with a small subject and razor thin DoF is pretty much a non-starter, you'll need to get good with manual focus or ...


9

There are several ways to increase magnification other than buying a new lens. Buying close-up adapter (sometimes called diopter) is quite cheap. You need to buy one that screws to the front of your lens, so check your thread-size (the same sizes when buying filters). Close-up adaptors come in different strength and quality levels. They best about this ...


9

I disagree with some of the things MikeW said. No matter what is between the subject and the sensor (or film), there will be light loss relative to what you would otherwise expect by considering only the f-stop. This is basic physics. The additional light loss relative to f-stop is 1/(1 + M)^2, where M is the magnification from the real subject to its ...


9

They are so you can detach the lens. The lens latches in place on it and you push the button to allow it to be removed. This is the same function as the lens release on your camera. When you go to put the tube on your camera you should attach the lens to the tube and then the assembly to the camera. When you are removing it, you reverse the process. ...


8

To give some idea of how things work out, here are a few pictures (all of a US dime, to give an idea of the scale). There are all of the full (APS-C) frame, not cropped, to give an idea of how large an area you get with each. First, a 100 mm macro at 1:1: Then, the same lens plus 68mm of extension tubes (a bit OOF, but still gives an idea of how much area ...


8

These extension tubes do NOT have any electrical contacts to send lens information to your camera, therefore, the camera assumes there is no lens attached and shows f00. These extension tubes just increase the distance between your camera sensor and the lens which enables you to focus closer and achieve greater magnification. Needless to say, you lose any ...


8

Yes you can. The more expensive extension tubes has camera-lens connections that let you control aperture. With the cheaper tubes you still have options: Obviously, you can use whatever aperture the lens uses when not connected (for Canon it's wide open, for Nikon it's fully stopped down). For Canon, connect the lens to the camera (without the tube), set ...


8

An extension tube, regardless of brand, does not degrade image quality since it has no lens. As the name suggests, it is just a tube with no glass in it. (Those with glass are called tele-extenders and have a totally different purpose.) The difference between brands are connectivity and build quality. Connectivity For some third party extension tubes, ...


7

I've used extension tubes in the past, with success, but what I did find was that you'll have to manual focus because the AF sensor gets really crazy with tubes. For most macro work you'll want to focus manually anyway, so use your camera's live view. I would stay away from close up filters. They're bulky and the quality is very poor. In general, if you ...


7

The more expensive Kenko tubes have contacts that allow the lens to pass metering and aperture information to the camera, and the necessary mechanics to work the aperture, so you can use the lens as normal. The cheap ones lack these, so you have to meter manually and your aperture will be fixed at its smallest diameter - ideally you need a lens with a ...


7

Extension tubes work by moving a lens further from the film or sensor. The closer an object is to the lens, the further back the focussed image will appear, hence extension tubes allow you to focus on objects closer to the lens than would be possible otherwise. They are commonly used a cheap way to improve the macro abilities of a lens. There are a few ...


6

The two lens you own might work, but be aware that their minimum focusing distance might not fit what you need. Macro lenses are special in that they have a much shorter MFD than regular lenses - this means that you can get closer to your subject and still focus, giving you a much larger subject for the same resolution. This is important when photographing ...


6

I think it can be described, in fact Wikipedia has the relevant formula: 1/S1 + 1/S2 = 1/f Where S1 is the distance from the subject to the front nodal point, S2 is the distance of the rear nodal point to the sensor, and f is the focal length. Since extension tubes increase S2, it then allows you make S1 smaller, thus you can focus much closer to the ...


6

Here's Estonian reverse of 1 euro-cent shot with my widest lens, Zenitar 16, at f/11 on 19mm extension tubes, giving 1.18x magnification: Not much room for lighting indeed, sidelight or glow-through with a translucent subject seem to be the only options:


6

Yup, they'll work - tubes should work* with any lens, even a reversed one for extreme macro. But the magnification is relative to the focal length - so adding 50mm of extension tubes to 200mm doesn't get you super close, show stopping macro shots. Using it at the 70mm end will produce higher magnification shots (although probably not 1:1), but less ...


6

If you use a cheap extension tube without CPU connections between the lens and the camera, then as far as the camera is concerned there is no lens connected, which is why it says F0. The lens automatically closes to its smallest aperture when it's detached, and if your extension tube doesn't hold it open, it will stay that way, because without a CPU ...


5

An extension tube doesn't have any optics in it, it's just a tube that is used to move the lens in relation to the sensor, because there's nothing but air in there all the extension tubes in the world will use the same air will give you the exact same image. There are 3 ways extension tubes differ: Electrical contacts Tubes with no electrical contacts ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible