It's a bird

by Vian Esterhuizen

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1

The problem you are experiencing is the lack of dynamic range (the ability to represent different levels of brightness) in you photo. The first step to increase the dynamic range is to set the camera to capture RAW files. The Raw format saves all of the captured image data from the sensor and this comes with the benefit of increased dynamic range. This RAW ...


1

Shoot RAW image and choose the compression of dynamic range yourself. Even if the camera can do it, printouts and monitors can't, so you need to arrange the tones as you want. Newer mid-grade cameras have 14-bit A-to-D and can probably capture that sceen in raw. bracket. If your camera doesn't hace the range, combine them using HDR software. If it does, ...


1

Pretty much all your questions are answered in this guide: http://filmshooterscollective.com/analog-film-photography-blog/a-practical-guide-to-using-film-characteristic-curves-12-25 What does 0.0 value represents (how to interpret it)? This is represented as a log scale, so 0.0 passes a certain value of light, 1.0 passes 1/10 that amount of light, 2.0 ...


0

but let's say the photographer didn't have possibility to turn off the light there... Why not? You are making it artificially complicated by not allowing it without knowing if it was indeed not possible. Maybe he just did it this way. Turning a light off can be as simple as covering it with something. Take a look at how the shadows of the framework ...


1

Cameras could do ETTR quicker and more accurately than humans No, because it is a judgement call what highlights need to be clipped. There is no agreement as to what is photographic dynamic range; and much here depends on the intended use and personal tolerance to noise and artifacts.


1

It is easier to let your camera meter for the background and for you as the photographer to take control of your subject and ultimately, control how much light you wish to use. Photography is just “Painting with Light”, and whereas on a bright day, when there may be an abundance of ambient light, you are still confronted with the following 2 scenarios; Is ...


2

The single best thing you can do at recording/shooting time is to swap your 6500K (cool daylight) lights for tungsten-balanced (2800-3400K) lights. You'll still want a high CRI, of course, but taking the temperature down vastly increases the weight of the red end of the spectrum. We don't see differences in colour (hue and saturation) nearly as well as we ...


2

My thoughts about smoothing out skin tones: Careful not to underexpose. You could probably expose a little bit hotter, putting the skin tones into the top third of the histogram where the S-curve starts to flatten more, being more flattering. Another thing, that image seems over-saturated, which isn't helping. Here's a quick fiddle I had just to see ...


1

I suggest you take the photo (in RAW) with a neutral grey card, and use the card to set the white balance in Lightroom or whatever postprocessing software you use. Another thing to consider is that RAW processing can vary dramatically between the camera's jpg renderer and different software packages. I thought Capture One (free trial, IIRC) did a ...


1

What you're looking for is the Sunny 16 rule. The wikipedia page is good enough; however, all of the SE sites don't like you to dump a link and leave. So, I'll just rip the rule straight from the page. Since you know the exposure triangle, it boils down to: at ISO 100 you use f/16 and 1/100s on a sunny day to get a properly exposed picture. With that as a ...


1

This may entirely depend on what camera you use. Canon cameras are rather notorious these days for not having competitive dynamic range. They have decent dynamic range, but it is no longer competitive, and there are alternative options that allow you to preserve considerably more shadow detail without the need to either worry about using ETTR at all, or you ...


5

ETTR is advocated so that you expose enough until you don't clip highlights That would be wrong without adding the word "important" or something similar, like in "don't clip important highlights". so that you can get less signal to noise ratio in the shadows Not less, but better (actually, higher; as noise is lower). ETTL is advocated because ...


1

Essentially, this is related to the two exposures that you get when using a flash: from the ambient light from the flash light, which is brighter than the ambient, thus can overpower it shorter (does not last the entire shutter speed), thus can freeze action not illuminating everything The last one is the important thing here. A usual way to think ...


1

It is like you said: Expose on the background in order to get the background correct. However, the face will then often be too dark, so you could use a flash. But you cannot do it reverse: If you expose on the face, then the background is too light, but you cannot correct this. As an option, if you want to avoid a flash, you could make a series and make a ...


1

It means to set your camera to expose the sky correctly. If you are in Manual exposure mode you need to look in your viewfinder to see if the ISO/shutter speed/aperture you have selected exposes the sky properly by looking to see what the meter is telling you. Adjust the ISO/shutter speed/aperture until the exposure meter in your viewfinder says you are ...



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