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3

Don't forget that when using E-TTL you can also apply different power ratios and flash exposure compensation to each group independently. In your example of the hair light you can either change the power ratio of the key light to the hair light. Or if you are only using a single flash you can dial it up or down using FEC. And by selecting the Av exposure ...


2

The basic answer is really that TTL flash isn't all that important in many situations, and that most of the situations where off-camera flash might be used fall into that camp. If you're in a place where the light doesn't change much, any exposure automation is not a big deal, let alone flash automation. It's handy for the first exposure of the session, and ...


5

The same is true when the flash is on the camera, facing away from the subject into empty space with nothing to reflect it back to the subject. The point of TTL is to adjust flash power automatically under the assumption that it has an influence on the scene. If the flash is on camera or not is not too relevant. In event photography or photojournalism for ...


2

The main part of this question comes down to How to calculate Lux from EV?, leaving only the problem of estimating the overexposure or underexposure. It seems that you want to do at automatically. That's easy to answer: you can't, really, unless all of your images are of similar, known subjects. Otherwise, you would need a great deal of artificial ...


1

The good part is that the camera does measure brightness of the seen in terms of an EV value. There are several different ways to do the measurement. Most of the modes calculate the result from a weighted average of the image. Some put more emphasis in the middle part (spot metering for example). If you know what mode was used and how the weights are ...


2

You can't get any light information from the jpeg, the mapping is highly non trivial and depends on the RAW processing algorithm. No two pictures will use the same curve. You could get light information from the RAW file, however. However you need the actual recorded values, you can't pass the file through a RAW processor, you need to parse the RAW file ...


4

No, exposure is not much dependent on exact focus. Metering close to the face is exactly correct for incident meters (which pros likely use, to read the actual light there at that spot, but the incident meter is aimed away from the subject, towards the camera.) But reflected camera meters will underexpose Caucasian light faces, about 1 stop. Reflected ...


1

Yes! That's why the "program shift" is the first non-automated thing you should learn. Let the camera suggest an exposure, but then use the knob to switch between equivalent exposures, to fit your artistic aims. Knowing how these affect the picture is the first thing to learn. Examples: change the aperture to ensure enough depth of field or throw the ...


1

As you mentioned that the total amount of light (eg exposure) would stay the same, the main difference you will see is in the depth of field. A smaller aperture (bigger f number) will give you a deeper depth of field - that is more things are (or more of the main subject is) in focus. For subjects with a light source you may also start to see a star-burst ...


2

It depends on what is on your picture. Short vs long exposure obviously gives different look if shooting moving objects. Even tree in modest wind can be a moving object if exposure is long enough. Or a cloud. And aperture determines the depth of field, so if you have some objects outside of the focusing plane, they will look more or less blurry depending on ...


0

The exposure formula is: The aperture, f/# = 1/ square root of the speed (was ASA, now is ISO). For example: The f/# would be f/10 for ISO 100 Shutter speed = 1/Candles per square foot. For example: 1/250 for 250 candles per square foot. Use footlamberts for incident light Use candles/sq. ft. times 10.76 for meter candles These are the values that were ...


1

Here is the photographic formula for the calculation of exposure used for photographic emulsions. Electronic ISO speed designations used today is an approximation of the earlier ASA speeds derived in the early 1930s. For all intents and purposes ASA and ISO are interchangeable. The f/# = sq. root of ASA shutter speed = 1/(candles per sq.ft.) Such exposure ...


1

Can you provide me some reference of this? If it's done by increase ISO, is it same as I increase ISO when capturing the photo? If they won't be the same, what's the difference or which way is better? Some cameras have analog ISO gain, some don't. Some cameras may have analog gain implemented only in certain ISO range. Different raw processors may ...


0

I wonder that if I increase the exposure of a RAW in some software, say, Lightroom, what do I lose in the image. It's important to keep in mind that no matter what you do to post-process a raw image to create some other output that is more readily "consumable" (i.e., JPEG, or PNG, etc.), you will lose data compared to the raw file. There is much more ...


4

...is it same as I increase ISO when capturing the photo? If they won't be the same, what's the difference... The end result is similar, but how you get there and the side effects are different. Increasing the ISO setting on the camera results in the addition of gain (amplification) in the path between the sensor and analog-to-digital converter, which ...


0

(Disclaimer: I'm Italian, it's fatiguing for me to write in English and moreover to write in technical jargon. Thus, the following explanation take a few shortcuts to be easier to write and to understand) I'll start from the bottom; increasing ISO in camera cannot obviously be like increasing the exposure of a file, whatever the algorithm used: increasing ...



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