Shadowy Daisy

Shadowy Daisy
by damned-truths

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2

From my experience (25+ years in the photo industry), Fuji film tends to handle overexposure by one stop without the need to pull-process. However, as Alaska Man stated, if you shot mainly in high-contrast or bright lighting, having the roll pulled a half-stop or full stop should help -- not fix 100%, just help. Overexposing actually decreases contrast, not ...


0

What are the points here that would help me decide. expired films may have lower than nominal speed, so consider how old the film is. Perhaps you are not overexposing it after all overexposure will increase contrast and color, this may be wanted or unwanted depending on your subject type of light the film was shot with. If it was shot with incandescent ...


4

I regularly over expose my film by 1/3 to 2/3 or 1 full stop depending on the conditions and the film and with the knowledge of how that film behaves and develops in the developers i use. Generally speaking overexposing film is better (to a point) than underexposing as you can not get details in the shadows in post processing if you did not record those ...


2

Definitely looks like a damaged shutter blind-this can happen if you don't use a lens cap on sunny days the sun will burn the blind via the lens


0

When one learns photography they are taught that they need to "correctly" expose the film or sensor in order to achieve an image that captures a range of light. The subjectivity of what is "correct exposure" aside, Exposure is the quantity of light allowed to pass through the lens and shutter in order to be captured by the film or the sensor. There are Two ...


1

ISO (International Organization for Standardization) specifies how photographic films are to be tested to determine their sensitivity to light. The ISO of any film is one of the key elements needed to calculate the camera exposure settings. Technically the ISO value is specific for films however digital photography embraces ISO thus the ISO settings of the ...


9

You're both right and wrong. Yes, technically the "ISO setting" is merely an amplification of sensor data. However the quantization (feeding the analog signal into the analog-digital converter) happens after the amplification. So, from the sensor (as in photosensitive die alone) point of view, the amplification doesn't change the actual light sensitivity. ...


3

Because the gain you set affects the image. The higher the gain, the brighter the resulting image from the sensor. While it may not specifically be the sensitivity of the sensor hardware to light that's affected, the sensitivity of the final image data to the light is affected by the iso setting you choose. Whether or not you use a gain setting of iso 100 ...


4

We control the sensitivity of the digital sensor or technically speaking controlling the post-image gain applied to the signal, but for all intents and purposes, we can think of it as sensitivity. It is part of the exposure triangle because when using an automatic or semi-automatic exposure mode the ISO setting influences the selected shutter speed or ...


0

Conform to practice. Do what reality suggests. If you know the conditions under which your work will be shown and you can't control the conditions, adapt your work to show to its best advantage. For example: I won't (knowingly) suggest a low-key image with shadow detail in a dimly lit environment.


0

It's a perception thing. Under certain dim lighting conditions, the "Purkinje shift" allows some colours that look the same under normal conditions to appear lighter or darker. It's due to the different luminosity response (apparent brightness) of the rods and cones in the retina. It's the actual colours in your print. Everything will look normal as the ...


0

Yes and No, if exposure is the same, smaller sensors give more image noise, if you crop factor ISO and changes exposure accordingly to compensate, then you will get the same picture but different exposure. More detailed explanation in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DtDotqLx6nA


0

Provide sufficient light where you hang your print. A dedicated soft spot light source for example will work wonders. Photoshop can do a lot, but it cannot make your print glow in the dark. If you think about it, that's what you are doing on your monitor as well. If you had an uncalibrated monitor that displayed your image too dark, would adjust the image ...


3

This is a common problem with indoor / night live event photography. I've battled it as well. You need low f/stop, or your shutter is too slow and people are motion blurred. But with the low f/stop, your depth of field is very shallow. Furthermore, High contrast between stage lights and unlight areas is hard to deal with too. I think your best bet is: ...


0

I haven't had a problem of images feeling dramatically different. But there is a different feel, and some do seem to led to backlight better and some feel better in print. I don't think it's just a matter of some adjustments as much as it is the nature of the media. I think print lends itself better to higher contrast content. You can adjust the brightness ...


0

[caveat: I am not a Canon expert] Image From the photo it appears that the flash is firing at a low power setting, e.g. the reflection over the skinny man with a tie center frame, various pieces of jewelry, etc. Scene By all appearances the scene appears to have relatively little ambient light and therefore wide aperture, slow shutter and high ISO are ...



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