Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

by sat

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

A response curve is the relation between what the input and output of a sensor or even film. As you may know, a sensor measures light by creating an electrical charge in response to photons hitting a photosite. One would expect in a perfect sensor that the amount of light falling on a photosite would be directly proportional to the charge it creates. If ...


8

I can't watch your videos at the moment, but if I got it correct they are timelapses of a plant growing while the environment doesn't change or changes very little. It gives the impression that the plant grows fully over a short amount of time, or the the plant and the environment move at different speed. If my assumption is correct, BBC did this for the ...


0

It is possible that the photos were taken manually using software that would allow overlaying the previous image with the current. This would allow to make sure that wind isn't causing a problem between frames and that positioning is good. Most likely by positioning it properly yourself. This is how stop motion is generally done now, by comparing the ...


1

There are several online depth-of-field (DOF) calculators that you can use to gain some understanding and have some initial idea. E.g. see this.


0

Start by trying with as low of an aperture number as possible. If the depth of field is too shallow (can't get subject completely in focus), then try increasing it, but there is far more to getting the background blurry and the subject clear. You also want to use the longest focal length you can, be as close to the subject as you can and have the ...


2

There's not enough information here to answer, because we're missing several important things. First, does your film SLR have metering? If so, is it "through the lens metering"? If it is a recent camera (1980s or after), the answer is almost certainly "yes", which makes the answer to your question "just do what the camera's meter tells you". The next bit ...


2

The properties of phone cameras vary a lot. With some you can set certain values, with others you can't and just shoot in an "auto" mode. Just the pixel count and the operating system aren't enough to tell this. There are some Android phones like Oppos N1 where you can set longer exposures up to 8 seconds. With the light painting as the main subject the ...


1

You seem to mix up focus features with metering features. You manual section on AI focus is assuming that you are in auto metering mode. it will keep tracking metering as well as focus in that mode, ASSUMING you have auto metering on. The metering mode, however, is set independently. You have your auto and semi auto modes. full auto, P mode (you chose ...


2

The answer to your question as written is: The exposure is set at the point the picture is taken, or put another way, when the shutter button is fully depressed. From previous questions, you've said you're using a Canon 550D; this information is available on page 67 of the manual. You can set the exposure manually by use of manual mode on your camera; if ...


0

It is correct to consider the light reflected a form of illuminance, but the term is usually used in the context of how much light energy is falling on a sensor in Lux, lumens or foot candles. Luminance is a measure of the intensity of something that is a brightness component of a scene. Another way to look at this in real life is the CIELAB color space. ...


1

your external meter wont tell you if your scene should be or not be medium exposed. that's what EC is for. if you shoot at a white wall, everything should be close to max. you make that decision how to use the value you get from the meter. just like the EC feature allows you to. often the Dynamic range in the scene is too large and you can point your meter ...


0

It depends what you're using exposure compensation for. If it's because your camera's built-in meter sometimes gets somewhat inaccurate in certain situations (e.g. Pentax cameras tend to under-expose slightly) then yes, a good quality external light meter would obviate the need for exposure compensation (though, as Guffa says, in order to use the external ...


5

Yes and no. If you are using a light meter, then you will never use the exposure compensation because you are setting the exposure manually. However, just because you measure the incoming light instead of the reflected light, that doesn't mean that every scene can be exposed only based on what the meter says. Instead of being fooled by how much light the ...


0

Another very plausible reason for the exposure change is if your using the 28mm 1.8 at f1.8 and you change to the 100mm 2.8. their is no larger aperture than f2.8 so exposure must be compensated.


16

There are two basic possibilities. First, and probably the biggest: the metering takes into account more of the scene with the wider angle, and the scene is different enough that the exposure choice is correspondingly different. This is particularly likely to be the case if there are actual light sources or shadow areas in the scene. You don't mention what ...


1

The meter will adjust to the scene depending on what meter mode you have selected. Depending on your camera you can have it meter as much as the whole frame, as tiny as a spot under the AF point, or somewhere in between. Let's say you have your 28mm on and taking a picture of something on your coffee table and the wide field of view gets the TV (which is ...


0

Generally speaking more light can help solve a lot of photography problems but direct sunlight tend to look pretty bad. What you should do is look for "open shade" - places that are not in direct sunlight but still get lots of light - this is the easiest solution. If you do want to take a picture in direct sunlight you probably want the sun to be to the ...


4

This is a prime example of why it is wise to shoot in RAW. With RAW images, it is a simple matter to bring down the highlights in the exposure and spots like this will mostly disappear. In the case of extreme highlights (even in RAW) or shooting JPEG, there isn't actually any information to replace the white spot with, so you will have to create your ...


2

This can be fixed with the patch tool in Photoshop, or simple cloning if the surrounding areas are similar. The healing brush is also a great tool, but depends more in the brightness of the surrounding pixels and the size of the brush your using to get it to work correctly. Posting a larger un-cropped image would help in this case.


3

Samuel, as some of the other answers have suggested, layer masks are very useful for this sort of thing. I wish I had learnt about layer masks earlier in my journey (and you may already have done so given the age of this question!) But in case it's useful to others who land here, here is my explanation of layer masks, and how they can be used in this ...



Top 50 recent answers are included