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by Jon

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0

My Canon PowerShot A2200 was experiencing the same problems. I just reset the camera to default settings under the tool menu. That fixed the problem. It appears that the original question did the same and it didn't fix the problem. So, for others looking at this, try just resetting the camera first.


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To check how exposure values correspond to the changes made through a curve (or any other tool), you can use simulated Kodak Q13 The original step wedge looks like this: The step between the neighboring patches is 1/3 EV. The values from Kodak documentation are The RGB values for gamma 1.8 and gamma 2.2 can be found here, and they are also present in the ...


0

I found my answer: Lightroom Tone Curve has a small button on the upper left corner which allows adjusting by dragging up and down using the mouse. When used, this tool shows two figures: original and adjusted brightness %. Here, the area under my pointer has an original brightness of 62% adjusted to 64% (as shown by the curve shape).


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The answer in this discussion is relevant and should answer. The tl;dr to your question is: The sensor can capture more than 1920x1080 but it only samples some of the pixels depending on the FOV. When using a wider angle, more of the sensor is exposed, so they just subsample (every other line, skipping pixels) the sensor. When using a narrower FOV, the area ...


3

mattdm is right but I feel when reading it, I understand it only because I know this answer all too well and also that if I was reading it fresh, I wouldn't understand it... 1. What are the parameters (of exposure) reduced at high sensitivity? Parameters of exposure, for any photograph or camera, are always: Available light (Sun, lamp, flash) Shutter ...


1

Sensitivity to light of a digital camera is constant. It can't be changed. ISO sensitivity is basically changed through an amplifier. Data coming out of the photodiode in the pixel can be changed only with the amount of light hitting the diode during the exposure. The rest is conversion factor, gain, and multiplication. The stronger is the amplification the ...


2

I think what's happening here is that you are reading "the reduction of exposure corresponding to use of higher sensitivities generally leads to reduced image quality", and then, very logically, thinking: okay, so, reduced exposure = reduced image quality, so clearly I need increased exposure.... This is, in fact, completely right: see this answer on ...


2

1/0.0166666666666667 = 60 quite easy :)


0

If it's really luminous you mean then a similar technique to photographing moving cars at night should work in theory (I've not tried this myself). These questions should point you in the right direction.


2

Photographing fluorescent (day-glo) colours is difficult because they are much brighter than they should be. They are actually light sources in the visible spectrum (they absorb invisible ultraviolet light, then re-emit the energy as visible light). It's not that they aren't bright enough, but that they're too bright, and if everything else in the image is ...


0

You might have a piece of cloth that reflects UV. It gives a brighter look to natural colors. (E.g. those glowing yellow markers. Or flowers.) You cannot capture the UV content of such colors with traditional cameras. There are some cameras that are able to capture UV, but those are pretty rare. And you will not be able to replicate those colors on your ...


0

A white card, or even an 18% grey card, is very useful to ensure consistent white balance across shots. Many cameras offer the ability to shoot a white card and then use that for custom white balance, thus saving a step in post production. Of course, its easy to use a grey or white card in Lightroom or Photoshop. (see my blog post on White Balance in ...


0

I can't know for sure but my guess is that the "dark gray" card is supposed to be black, the "dull white" is supposed to be white and the "light gray" is the 18% gray card. It's actually really easy to test what card to use an if it's worthwhile. Get some family member to pose for you and take 3 photos, in each lock exposure and white balance using a ...


0

You don't need a gray card anymore with a modern camera. There were two things going on with the standard 18% gray card. First, it was a shade of gray, so could be used for color balancing. Back in the wet silver days, you could pick only one shade to match between the real world and a print. 18% gray was a good choice for that. You can think of it ...


1

Skin tones vary wildly, so going by the numbers can only get you into the ballpark at best. At some point, you are going to have to learn to eyeball things (where "eyeball" is understood to be a subjective process carried out on a calibrated monitor so that you have at least a reasonable expectation that what you see on the screen is living in the same ...


0

I would just point out another consideration, that I haven't seen mentioned in the answers. When looking for blown out highlights and shadows, beware also of the posterization (i.e. blotches of color coming from compression or lack of available hues) that may come around under-overexposed areas, especially following JPEG compression, and when you try to ...


2

It is definitely not possible to use a single severely underexposed image and combine it with itself to get a correctly exposed image. The information is simply not there. The idea of combining multiple exposures is to minimize the noise. If you're using one image the noise will be amplified whereas using many different exposures the noise will, ideally, ...


0

Bulb Mode means now it is upto you to hold shutter release button how long you want. Ideally in long exposure more, do this Mount your camera on a tripod attach a shutter release cable keep ISO max upto 400 f stop 11 is good with Nikon D90 and kit lens 18-105 Keep it on Bulb Mode Use stopwatch to time (1 minute, 90sec, 120sec) Now Just shoot and analyse ...


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One factor not mentioned is that your light meter may be wildly misleading in this scenario. Light meters basically assume that your subject is averagely bright... the classical example is the 18% grey of a grey card; in most cases this will be reasonably correct but for a night-time cityscape consisting of a number of very bright light sources on a quite ...


1

The answers so far don't seem to talk about bulb mode, which I think should be mentioned: If you want f22 as the aperture, and you want a reasonable ISO so the image isn't too noisy, then the solution to me is to go over the 30 second exposure available with the built in settings, and going into Bulb mode. You can experiment with it without one, but I ...


2

Cities aren't that dark even at night, you equipment should be able to take the picture just fine. Your first problem is that f/22 is a tiny tiny aperture, it lets very little light into the camera - so, to compensate the camera needs a very long exposure and the built in timer only goes up to 30 seconds. I also think you might be mistaking about the ...


9

I guess that the kit lens is a 18-55 mm f/3,5-5,6 and together with a D90 there is no reason to buy a full-frame camera. It wont solve any of your problems and you'll be able to take this photo with the gear you have without any problems at all. Firstly, you would want to stay away from shooting at f/22. It will not give you sharp images nor the light that ...



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