Incense

by Bart Arondson

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5

If the exposure is correct, then it is not an exposure problem. The problem is that you are working in difficult conditions, with low light and people moving. There is really no good solution. You either push the ISO until you have an acceptable aperture (for depth of field) and shutter speed (for avoiding motion blur), or you use the flash. For these kind ...


15

Read the histogram, not the image on the LCD. In addition to errors because of screen brightness vs ambient brightness, the image on your screen is corrected by your camera before showing it on the screen. Most cameras allow you to adjust that, to remove saturation/sharpening adjustments, but you're still trying to judge your raw image based on an "edited" ...


1

No! Take it to the repair shop. Something like that would probably cost about $100 to get repaired (get an estimate to verify). It really could be a multitude of issues and pulling apart the lens when you are not a trained expert isn't going to give you answers you're looking for.


0

Here's what looks like a similar problem on a Nikon D5100. It sounds like the culprit is a damaged sensor, possibly due to laser light.


3

As Per page 150 of this 6D manual, the 'Spot metering' setting: ... is for metering a specific spot of the subject or scene. The metering is weighted at the center covering approx. 3.5% of the viewfinder area. Spot metering area diagram from manual. When the camera is in this metering mode the selected focus point is not taken into consideration. ...


6

Histogram is the best way to judge. How are you shooting? If you're shooting in JPEG, you should check your camera settings to see if you have the brightness turned up or contrast down or something strange like that. Assuming you're shooting in raw and opening the files in something like lightroom, then you're probably actually overexposing. Because ...


2

Depending on what camera you use, under exposure may not be a problem at all. Typically most modern serious sensors give you a lot of leeway in downward latitude. You can always readjust your exposure in lightroom if you shoot raw. I have successfully pushed the raws from my camera by 3 stops (although I don't recommend that!). But digital sensors are ...


6

Algebraically, we want to to solve the following equation:     2n = 1 / (1 / 4000) Taking log2 of both sides, we get     n = log2(1 / (1 / 4000))     n ≈ 12 Indeed, shutter speeds are supposed to be powers of two, so 1/4000 should actually be 1/4096 (that is, 1/212); they're just rounded to ...


4

Each stop is double the amount of light - so: doubling 1/4000 goes to 1/2000, then 1/1000, and 1/500, 1/250, 1/125, 1/60 (not exactly double but close enough), 1/30, 1/15, 1/8 (another "close enough"), 1/4, 1/2 and finally 1. So we need to double the value 12 times - 12 stops


0

According to the table on this page, it's 12 stops.


0

The lightbulb looks overexposed, the dirt on the lightbulb which is so clearly visible in the first image is no longer visible in the final image. The whole point of HDR is to make all the details in both the extremely dark and light parts to become better visible.


1

I have done freezing water motion shots before. It is quite simple to do once you understand the concept. You need to light the water with flash only. The flash duration is "fast" enough to capture motion. And you should be shooting in a very dark room. Set your camera to manual focus on the spot where the water will appear along, manual exposure with ...


4

Freezing motion is about controlling the light, more importantly it's about controlling the amount of time the light will strike the sensor. To do that, you have two basic options: Shutter speed Flash duration Shutter speed with ambient light is pretty tricky unless you have a lot of really bright light. The better way to go about this is to control the ...


0

In order to capture such small objects moving quickly through the air, you'll need a much faster shutter than 1/200. Begin by lowering you aperture, start with f5.6 (up 4 steps) and increase your shutter to 1/1600 (down 4 steps) and try again. If you are still getting blur with the drops, increase the ISO and step the shutter down more. Continue ...


2

I also think that it depends on the camera. Factors include the bit-depth of the A/D, the various sources of noise, and unknown details. With all the theory requiring possibly unknown parameters even if the model is right, the only thing to do is a real test. Assuming the histgram fits completely in the exposure so you aren't deciding which end to cut ...


3

It depends on the properties of the sensor in your camera. Raising the ISO setting means you amplify the signal before reading it out, this means your signal level is higher and thus read noise is lower relative to the signal, improving the overall signal to noise ratio. However Sony Exmor sensors (found in all NEX bodies, and many current Nikon/Pentax ...


0

Generally this would be a problem with your ISO setting. You can do a few things to play around: Try manual mode at around f16 Set the ISO to 100 or 200 Perform a "green and green" reset - hold both qual and +/- buttons With the ring flash, I'd suggest using a static shutter speed of about 1/160, then dial in the f-stop based on the distance to your ...


0

It won't make any difference, except (perhaps) to the film that was already pulled out of the canister. The canister, after all, is designed to keep light off of the film while you handle it in the open, and it does a very good job of it. So your first shot or perhaps the second and the edge of a third might be affected at most. Even then, the light path to ...


0

The Nikon D7000 camera model us not listed on Sigma's compatibility table for this ring flash.



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