Watching Over

by Vian Esterhuizen

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12

It's a case of 'read the manual'. Page 54 - D600 manual. Just posting in case any one else ponders this. Exposure Depending on the scene, exposure may differ from that which would be obtained when live view is not used. Metering in live view is adjusted to suit the live view display, producing photographs with exposure close to what is seen ...


1

Normally, yes, 2 EV. In some cases a space is missing, that is it is 1 2/6 EV, or 1 1/3 EV.


6

You will always have one value touch the top of the graph because the scale is set to match the max Y value. It's not important what that Y value is, only it's relative proportion to the other Y values (hence, no numbers, ever). Below is an image that is 50% black and 50% white and you can see the graph is peaked on both sides. You can't see it in the ...


6

The scale is somewhat arbitrary, and it is adaptive. That is, it's automatically scaled in an attempt to remain as useful as possible, given the image and its current adjustments. If you create an image in Photoshop that has a perfectly even distribution of colour or grey tones (let's say a 256-pixel image with one pixel each of every shade of grey from ...


0

Someone at Adobe says: It is the same as photographic exposure, but like Lee Jay says, in Lr 4 Beta with PV 2012 the response is more similar to film. Photographic exposure simply means that an increase in 1 stop means doubling the amount of light (photons) and decrease in 1 stop means halving the amount of light. This is still very much the ...


1

Proper exposure would be simply a multiplication in linear space, so the shape would have to change as values get redistributed. What you are thinking of would happen if they did an addition to all the pixels. That would also change the exposure but would not correspond in any way closely to what happens in case you had changed the exposure in-camera. In ...


1

The strict answer to your question is no. I say strict because your question says "the same as". The degree of wash out is related to proximity to the moon and, of course, the brightness of the moon. When the moon is visible in the sky the area of wash out is greater than when it's below the horizon. The further away you look from the moon the less the wash ...


0

Such scenes need either to be bracketed (that is shot varying exposure), or exposed according to spotmeter - measure the brightest part where you want to keep details and add 3 stops to exposure. With landscapes, a graduated neutral density filter is very helpful. Polarizing filter may help sometimes too. And of course set your camera to record raw. You ...


9

Like the other answerers have noted, it's not at all obvious which picture is taken with a DSLR — both have some pretty obvious issues, like blown highlights and poor contrast. Rather than enumerating the problems, let me offer a few tips for you and your friend on shooting scenes like this: If in doubt, always underexpose. This goes especially for ...


14

I gather from the aspect ratios (top one is 3:2, bottom one is 4:3), that the top image is the dSLR one, and the bottom image is the one from your TZ40. And at web sizes, while there's some improvement in image quality with the dSLR, it's not a huge amount better, and some could be compensated for with post-processing, rather than using ...


4

Both of those images could easily have been taken by a modern smartphone. To get a better image regardless of format what needs to be done is control of the wide dynamic range in this scene. The sky is very bright and blown out in both images. The ground is much darker. Techniques like HDR, Exposure Fusion, and Graduated Neutral Density filters will all help ...


7

To be honest, I couldn't easily guess which is which when viewed at the default 600-pixel-wide size above. Both handle the dynamic range of the clouds pretty poorly, with the lower image being a little less bad. Looking more closely, the top image has significantly more detail in the trees — but still isn't astounding. (Both are subject to very high JPEG ...


1

I'm going out on a limb and saying the DSLR is first. The most obvious difference is the difference in post processing. If your friend was shooting on RAW on the DSLR, it allows for far better adjustment of contrast in post. Additionally, the larger sensor and better quality optics on the DSLR allowed for some additional sharpness for the trees and also ...


1

Exposure Value (or, EV) is a way of representing the brightness of a scene in a simple numeric scale. The scale is measured in "stops", a standard concept in photography where each stop is a doubling or halving of the amount of light. This is convenient, because we also work with the fundamental parameters of exposure — aperture, shutter speed, and ISO ...


-2

Last night 03/01/2015 trying my cannon 650d with tmount onto scope 1/4000sec auto ISO. only had a few minutes of no clouds. Messed about with filters in photoshop.


0

I took this shot the other night, hand held using a Nikon DF with a very old Nikon 500mm F8 Mirror lens. ISO 400, 1/500 sec, -3 stops on the exposure compensating dial.


0

If you want to capture the moon, ignoring the rest of the scene, use spot metering, with the moon being the spot. See if your camera lets you move the spot around in the frame. If not, move the camera so that the moon is at the centre of the frame, meter the scene, and then move your camera to get the framing you want, and take the photo. If you want to ...


1

I've recently been trying out a Fujifilm S1 bridge camera (I have P&S cameras and DSLRs) on lunar shots and went through some of the in-camera processing modes to see what they would yield. On the S1 there is an "advanced" mode called "low-key" that works really well on the moon at almost all phases, unless you're trying to capture earthshine. Normally ...



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