Red and Blue

by Gordon

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

According to Gary Fong (Sony's Intelligent Auto And Superior Auto Modes), the main difference is that Superior Auto can use multiple exposures (in-camera HDR), while Intelligent Auto just uses a single image. This is confirmed by Sony's documentation: What is the difference between [Superior Auto] mode and [Intelligent Auto] mode? In [Superior ...


2

You could use a fill light from a reflector or another strobe to illuminate the background a bit. Of course, that means additional setup time and expense. You could experiment with extending exposure, at least on the Canon, to reduce the brightness of the ring-light in comparison to the background (e.g. increase exposure time so that light keeps entering ...


1

Try using a polarizing filter over your camera lens. You will have to test different areas of the sky to determine the best angle for the deepest blue while dialing your filter for effect. You'll see the sky darken/lighten as you turn the filter ring. Once established, your exposure should work on auto. You'll also get richer colors on the balloons, ...


2

Generally it should be possible to nail the exposure on the first try, the old analog masters did it, too. When you're metering a small, far away object, the metered area will be much larger than the object and you get a lot of sky metered, consequently. I like the concept of Ansel Adams' Zone System for this: You have to use spot metering for this, if ...


3

That doesn't seem normal, no. Because the f/number relates to exposure at any given point (not total sensor size), the crop factor shouldn't matter. Since you had a one-stop lower ISO, one would expect the other camera to be correct at half the shutter speed, not several times longer. Were you both framing a roughly identical scene? Does the same thing ...


1

"EV increases as ISO increases. This does not make sense to me..." Let's put this in plain English: Higher ISO film is more sensitive to light. In digitalese, a higher ISO setting makes the sensor more sensitive. If you are not careful you can overexpose your shots easily. "A high Exposure Value(EV)" means that the film will appear to have been dosed with ...


1

The black bar you are seeing is the curtain from your shutter. Your shutter speed (1/500) is faster than your camera's flash sync speed (1/200). To get rid of the black bars, you either need to enable "high speed sync" on your flash (if it has the feature), or choose a shutter speed of 1/200 or slower.


1

If this is like every other Canon camera, Av exposes for ambient, and uses the Flash for fill. P assumes the foreground is the subject, so it exposes for that. For your Av photo, the camera found the subject very dark, so pushed to get as much light as possible, However, the fill flash was close to the subject, so it is over exposed. You can see that the ...


4

You see the curtain of your camera: nice, no? If you want to avoid that with mark III , use a shutter speed lower than 1/200s You could use high flash speed sync, but I am quite sure that your flash can't use that, so with this flash, your only solution will be under 1/200s or use a ND filter to have less light entering your lens Check this tutorial on ...


1

Looking at http://www.firstcall-photographic.co.uk/userfiles/file/faultsonblackandwhitenegatives.pdf and http://www.olympusmicro.com/primer/photomicrography/bwprocessingerrors.html it could be one of the following things (or even combinations thereof): Underexposure Underdevelopment Inadequate fixing Variations in processing temperature (reticulation) If ...


1

To create a sort of analogy, let's consider a final, perfectly exposed photograph to be 100 litres of collected water, our camera, is the rainforest, and our camera's sensor, is a bunch of small buckets. We're going to play god here so we can control the environment (our camera) manually, and try to collect the rain using our buckets. Now, we have several ...


1

Light is either directly coming from its source or is being reflected by some object into the opening of your lens. The aperture controls how big that opening of the lens is. The shutter speed determines how long that opening is open. More precisely: for how long light going through the lens can reach the sensor. ISO determines how much light will result ...



Top 50 recent answers are included