Napioa - Wind Origins

Napioa - Wind Origins
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9

It sound like your camera is locking the exposure in addition to the focus when you perform a half shutter press. This would explain the overexposure when moving from a dark river to the bright sky: the camera is set to expose a dark scene properly, but it then gets pointed at a brighter scene, and subsequently over exposes. The converse is true as well, ...


3

This happens because (by default) a half-press on the shutter not only sets the auto-focus, but the auto-exposure as well. If you don't want to set the exposure or focus manually, you can set one of the function buttons to activate auto-exposure lock ("AEL"). With this setup, you would point the camera at the object you want to expose for first, push the AEL ...


3

Anytime you can afford the delay. It reduces vibration from the mirror movement which simply means there will be reduced vibration in the system. This is always good, unless, of course, you cannot time your shot in advance beause you are shooting a moving subject. This does not mean that it always needed since there are other sources of vibration such as ...


3

I've accidentally exposed two 400 ASA B&W films at 200 ASA In other words, you've overexposed it by a stop. (See What is the relationship between ISO, aperture, and shutter speed? if you need a refresher on that.) The fix for this is called "pull processing" (the opposite of "push processing", which is used when you underexpose, treating the fill as ...


3

Your camera is locking both focusing and metering with shutter button half-press - focus lock is called AFL, metering lock is called AEL. It will be most convinient for you to setup your camera to not lock metering with half-press. You do not need to use additional buttons for that at all despite other suggestions.


3

No, there is no practical way of deducing one of images from "multiexposure" serie which results in single file.


3

It sounds like your core question here is how to convert the "1536 LM" — presumably meaning lm, the standard prefix for lumens — to an exposure value which you can use to find camera settings. That's fundamentally the same question as How do I compare a continuous light panel's brightness vs. flash through a softbox? There I was starting with candelas ...


2

In manual, cameras have 1/2 and 1/3 stop increments because it is difficult to discern 1/3 of a stop, much less a finer resolution than that, and smaller increments would simply mean having to spin a thumb wheel that many more times to get to the setting you want. In an auto mode you would think the camera could freely choose any intermediate value it ...


2

It can depend upon the camera and lens you are using, but the vast majority of cameras use the same step sizes whether shooting in manual mode, a semi-automatic mode, or fully automatic mode.


1

The D3200 User Manual says: "Selecting live view in "Auto" or "Flash disabled" mode enables automatic scene selection (“scene auto selector”) when autofocus is used." (Page 20) Can it happen that you are in either of these, and not in P, A, S, or M? Also, Depending on the scene, exposure may differ from that which would be obtained when live ...


1

Personal opinion only: I find that a sharp but noisy picture is usually preferable to a less noisy out of focus picture. Exceptions may be in situations where artistic aspects make the achieved degree of blur acceptable. Your findings may differ. (1) Lowest speed - SSL : Shoot at as low a speed as you can and still tolerate the target's & your motion ...


1

Your best approach when exposure time is fixed (and practically limited) is record RAW images and use as high ISO as possible without loosing necessary highlights. This graph shows how to select the best ISO setting for lowest SNR. You drop diagonal onto the graph and pick the ISO which is closest to it. In this graph the ISO settings closest to ideal are ...


1

You can try using polarizers on the light source and/or lens. You will need to determine experimentally if using crossed polarizers increases the contrast sufficiently.


1

When using tripod, it can be harmful for image quality to use VR as it does not guarantee shake absence even when camera is steady (if you imply Nikon's VR). However, certain implementations of stabilisation may be good even with tripod but you need to check it yourself. When canera is not fixed it may indeed be profitable to use exposure delay (both with ...



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