Spring 2012

Spring 2012
by ani

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9

You're both right and wrong. Yes, technically the "ISO setting" is merely an amplification of sensor data. However the quantization (feeding the analog signal into the analog-digital converter) happens after the amplification. So, from the sensor (as in photosensitive die alone) point of view, the amplification doesn't change the actual light sensitivity. ...


7

The same is true when the flash is on the camera, facing away from the subject into empty space with nothing to reflect it back to the subject. The point of TTL is to adjust flash power automatically under the assumption that it has an influence on the scene. If the flash is on camera or not is not too relevant. In event photography or photojournalism for ...


4

We control the sensitivity of the digital sensor or technically speaking controlling the post-image gain applied to the signal, but for all intents and purposes, we can think of it as sensitivity. It is part of the exposure triangle because when using an automatic or semi-automatic exposure mode the ISO setting influences the selected shutter speed or ...


3

Because the gain you set affects the image. The higher the gain, the brighter the resulting image from the sensor. While it may not specifically be the sensitivity of the sensor hardware to light that's affected, the sensitivity of the final image data to the light is affected by the iso setting you choose. Whether or not you use a gain setting of iso 100 ...


3

I regularly over expose my film by 1/3 to 2/3 or 1 full stop depending on the conditions and the film and with the knowledge of how that film behaves and develops in the developers i use. Generally speaking overexposing film is better (to a point) than underexposing as you can not get details in the shadows in post processing if you did not record those ...


3

This is a common problem with indoor / night live event photography. I've battled it as well. You need low f/stop, or your shutter is too slow and people are motion blurred. But with the low f/stop, your depth of field is very shallow. Furthermore, High contrast between stage lights and unlight areas is hard to deal with too. I think your best bet is: ...


3

Don't forget that when using E-TTL you can also apply different power ratios and flash exposure compensation to each group independently. In your example of the hair light you can either change the power ratio of the key light to the hair light. Or if you are only using a single flash you can dial it up or down using FEC. And by selecting the Av exposure ...


2

The basic answer is really that TTL flash isn't all that important in many situations, and that most of the situations where off-camera flash might be used fall into that camp. If you're in a place where the light doesn't change much, any exposure automation is not a big deal, let alone flash automation. It's handy for the first exposure of the session, and ...


2

Definitely looks like a damaged shutter blind-this can happen if you don't use a lens cap on sunny days the sun will burn the blind via the lens


1

From my experience (25+ years in the photo industry), Fuji film tends to handle overexposure by one stop without the need to pull-process. However, as Alaska Man stated, if you shot mainly in high-contrast or bright lighting, having the roll pulled a half-stop or full stop should help -- not fix 100%, just help. Overexposing actually decreases contrast, not ...


1

ISO (International Organization for Standardization) specifies how photographic films are to be tested to determine their sensitivity to light. The ISO of any film is one of the key elements needed to calculate the camera exposure settings. Technically the ISO value is specific for films however digital photography embraces ISO thus the ISO settings of the ...



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