Serene Life

by garik

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11

You can't view a RAW image, because a RAW file is not an image, it is a set of monochrome luminance values. When the data is converted to RGB using demosaicing certain settings such as contrast, saturation, etc. are applied. There has to be a value for those settings. You are much better off learning to use the histogram (also drawn from the JPEG preview) to ...


11

Your camera is limiting your shutter speed to the 60D's maximum sync speed. If you were to use a faster shutter speed, you'd have black bars at the top and/or bottom of the frame, because the shutter curtains would be covering part of the sensor when the flash burst goes off. The only way to use a faster shutter speed than 1/250s with flash it to use ...


6

No. As far as exposure value goes, an f-stop is an f-stop. It's only where depth of field is concerned (and noise calculations derived from "total light captured", if you're the type who has to go there) that you need to think about equivalent f-stops. So if you are reading 1/250 at f/4, set your camera to 1/250 at f/4. That will give you a ...


5

Your logic is sound. If your assumptions were right, then your conclusion would be right. Let me turn one of your questions around. You ask: Why does crop factor apply with APS-C-lenses, while it sounds like the image circle is compressed onto the APS-C-sensor (thus making a wider FOV)? In fact, the image circle isn't compressed, and does not make a ...


4

You can use Magic Lantern to display RAW histogram in live view and image review. Head over to http://www.magiclantern.fm and download the version available for your camera. The installation instructions are different for each camera and can be found in their forums. In order to view RAW histogram in the preview, you could shoot with the technicolor ...


3

With manual flash and camera in manual mode, I think you already hit on one method of "metering" ... trial and error. Take a picture, chimp, adjust. Repeat until lighting is what you want. The other way is to use a handheld light meter.


3

Here are some options: Find some shade If there's too much light for your style you need a location with less light :-) in mid-day sunlight you may need something pretty big to block enough light but still it's an easy option Shoot at a better time of day At early morning and late evening there's less light and you'll be able to get the aperture/shutter ...


2

Philosophical Ramblings: I commend you on exploring. Having developed the Faith that something useful exists, and taking the effort and time to make the journey. Acting to extinguish self-deceit. Perhaps a more "Useful" commentary: What might happen if you take your camera with a flash unit attached, and turn it upside down to take the picture? Put it ...


2

According to the Manual: No. The longest shutter time is 15s, even in Manual Mode. No mention of a Bulb mode. Your best shot at achieving functionality is by trying out the CHDK alternative firmware, which allows an override of the Shutter Speed values, letting you select how long you want. It seems the CHDK is available for the SX160 IS (cf. here). Try at ...


1

The term you're looking for is dynamic range, which is the difference between the brightest and darkest areas. If this was shot in RAW I would be surprised if you couldn't pull the highlights back and recover the detail in the clouds, but if this was a JPEG then it's simply a case of the camera not being capable of knowing which bright areas to darken and ...


1

Your best option is probably using the "Neutral" picture style, this will apply minimum processing with a flat tone curve and no sharpening. This will give you the closest thing to a raw histogram available in-camera but it will make the jpeg look dull and lifeless - so you'll lose the ability to use the jpeg and preview for anything except judging focus.


1

The image circle produced by a lens is independent of the focal length. It is the combination of the focal length and the sensor size that determine the effective FOV. For example, a 90mm lens designed for a view camera with film that is 4x5 inches in size will have a wide angle FOV on that camera. But take that same lens and mount it on a DSLR with an APS-C ...


1

You are misunderstanding a few things that are causing you confusion. The only difference between a lens designed for a full frame sensor and a lens designed for an APS-c sensor is that the APS-c lens collects less light since it is producing a smaller image circle. The light per surface area of the image circle is the same, but the circle is smaller. An ...


1

To answer your basic questions: yes, you should use manual in this situation. Most times when you're shooting in an area with constant, even lighting and you want to maintain exposure between images, use manual. Your camera is correctly metering, but your camera is oblivious to what it is photographing. Looking at your shots, I'm guessing you had some light ...


1

On a basic level, it's not so much overexposing, but shooting with lots of light in the background. This can be a white room (or a white box, depending on the size of the subject), or shot against bright diffuse light outdoors. Most cameras will tend to underexpose such scenes if used in automatic mode, so you would need to compensate by "overexposing". In a ...


1

I've been exploring use of flash for the first time myself, using 50mm f1.8 lens. For me I get best results in camera manual mode (pick shutter speed and aperture), and then fine-tuning my flash's manual settings (i.e. for camera settings I leave them stable, and just tinker with the flash). For example - I find flash power 1/16 and zoom 105mm gives really ...


1

I'll assume you have tried the following: reducing the power of the flash moving the flash further from the subject placing a diffuser between the flash and the subject to absorb a bit of light These will all reduce the amount of illumination arriving on your subject but may not be ideal for your situation. This is an atypical situation -- most ...


1

The manual (M) mode only means the light metering is manual. Focusing is still automatic unless you toggle the MF/AF switch on the lens. In your case, there's simply too little light available for the AF system to find focus, and by default the camera will refuse to take a picture in this situation. How to Force my Nikon D5000 to take a photo in low light? ...



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