India Point Park

India Point Park
by matt-ball                

Submit your Photo
Hall of Fame

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Hot answers tagged

12

There are quite a few advantages. A difficult problem that often arises is blooming of bright areas into adjacent dark areas. So, the overexposed pixels that are in the bright area will leak electrons to adjacent pixels, making them get gray values that are too high. If the contrast is very high, those pixels may be in dark areas. This means that with only ...


8

You are not actually adding light, you are simply enhancing what little light you gathered. With a JPEG, "stretching" or "pushing" and "attenuating" are all done in the camera, and those enhancements are baked into the JPEG file, which is then lossy compressed and stored in a low precision format (8-bpc, 0-255). With a RAW image, you are storing the ...


6

There is nothing special or magical in RAW files. When it comes to exposure and balance, RAW files just store more information about colors, than JPEG files do. Either way, these colors consist of Red, Green, and Blue values and by manipulating these values you can always adjust white balance or exposure, regardless of the file type... in the ideal world. ...


4

Most definitely not a stupid question: I actually wondered the same thing when I first got into shooting raw. Before you can really understand what's happening when you adjust exposure in software, you first need to know what a digital camera's sensor and electronics do when you take a photo: count photons. Each pixel of the sensor essentially records the ...


3

Not sure if its a setting I may have changed by accident or something to do with the light sensors? It's very likely that you changed a setting accidentally, or that the light changed and you didn't change any settings to compensate. A passing cloud can make a big difference in the amount of available light. Also, if you were shooting in the late ...


3

What's the minimum exposure time that can be achieved in bulb mode? Technically, the minimum exposure time is probably limited by the speed that a person can press and release the shutter button (or remote shutter release). I assume this is somewhere on the order of 0.1 seconds (1/10 shutter speed) or so. However, this is highly variable and difficult ...


3

More images will give you better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), since you will have a good SNR for every absolute brightness value if you do more intermediate steps. The brightest captured parts of the image will have the best SNR and, thus, “details”, it's the same reason for “expose to the right” (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exposing_to_the_right). If ...


2

EV, Exposure Value, is used to summarise the two camera settings, exposure time and aperture, in one value. Cementing the idea that there are many pairs of exposure time and aperture that yield a given exposure. If the ISO used is known, or assumed, typically ISO 100, then the EV is directly related to the lighting conditions. Sometimes this is shown as ...


2

Auto Lighting Optimizer is one potential culprit, but it is pretty easy to rule that out. The Auto(Basic Zone) mode will default ALO to Standard, so just change your ALO setting to standard in Av and run a test. My guess is that your issue is actually the metering mode though. The Auto(Basic Zone) mode will use Evaluative Metering. Check to make sure your ...


1

There is a looseness or imprecision in the general use of terms like EV and LV that are leading to some confusion here. So first we need to use consistent terminology and labels to unravel this. EV is a relative number, independent of any concept of ISO. There is no ISO anywhere in the EV equation. This agrees with the Wikipedia article on Exposure Value: ...


1

You were shooting in full Manual mode. Full Manual mode lets you shoot yourself in the foot all you want. Overexposed, underexposed, out of focus, etc. You can do all that in Manual mode. All the other modes on the dial are automated in such a way that you may be able to lock one setting down (aperture, shutter speed, iso, whatever), but the camera will ...


1

Let's simplify the problem to understand why we will always have to make compromises. Let's invent the camera you want, but with only one monochrome pixel. It needs to be able to reliably receive and notify the processor of the reception of a single photon. It also needs to be able to receive and notify the processor of the reception of, practically ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible