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Hot answers tagged

6

Is E-TTL Universal? No, it's the opposite of universal. It is proprietary and specific to Canon. Each brand has their own specific flash/camera communication system. The only thing that's universal is the sync (fire) signal [which is a short between ground (rails) and the center contact of the hotshoe], because that's part of the ISO standards for flash ...


5

No. E-TTL is a proprietary part of Canon's EOS flash system. Some third parties (e.g. Metz, Sigma, Yongnuo) have reverse engineered it, but to my knowledge it is not licensed to anyone else. Most of the third-party flashes are of the hotshoe type, but a few (again e.g. Yongnuo) offer AC-powered studio strobes as well. It looks like Profoto is included in ...


4

I regularly over expose my film by 1/3 to 2/3 or 1 full stop depending on the conditions and the film and with the knowledge of how that film behaves and develops in the developers i use. Generally speaking overexposing film is better (to a point) than underexposing as you can not get details in the shadows in post processing if you did not record those ...


4

Your subject or scene was too brightly lit. Use a shorter exposure time or smaller aperture like f/22 You should also use a lower ISO like 50 or 100 and/or use a Neutral Density filter to reduce the light.


3

The value on the rear LCD when it is in the Quick Control Screen is not a meter reading at all. It is the amount of exposure compensation that you have entered. The 7D Mark II allows exposure compensation to be entered even in M exposure mode because it is possible to manually control Tv and Av in *M** mode while the ISO setting is set to Auto. (Please see p....


2

From my experience (25+ years in the photo industry), Fuji film tends to handle overexposure by one stop without the need to pull-process. However, as Alaska Man stated, if you shot mainly in high-contrast or bright lighting, having the roll pulled a half-stop or full stop should help -- not fix 100%, just help. Overexposing actually decreases contrast, not ...


2

Settings: D3200, Sigma 70mm Macro. YN560 III & YN560 IV, triggered by the 560-TX. F13, 1/200s and ISO100. I am guessing 1/32 on both units. It depends on what/how you're shooting. But I think you're being wildly optimistic on how much light your $70 flashes can put out if you're shooting portraits. Although, if you were going for a black ...


2

Light from a flash (or any point source lamp) falls off rapidly with distance. If we double the distance between subject and flash, the light playing on the subject decreases to ¼ its original value. Thus nobody can answer your question without knowing the distances involve and whether one or two flashes are to be used. If two, what distances etc. Guide ...


1

Flash exposure is different than the "three components of continuous ambient'. Flash exposure is Not affected by shutter speed, but a more huge difference, flash exposure is greatly affected by the distance between flash and subject (flash and local lights fall off fast with distance, but sunlight does not, not here on Earth). The Yongnuo 560 III manual ...


1

When an image is all white it means the entire scene is overexposed to the point all three color channels are fully saturated. Think of it this way: If a scene has twice as much blue as red and green when properly exposed the amount of blue recorded will be twice the amount of red and green recorded. It also means it is possible to fully saturate the blue ...


1

In response to M. Clark's statement. That is not the case on the Canon 6d and other Canon cameras I suspect,the mirror is just partially silvered and reflective glass and is not as fragile as some think, the reflective material is basically baked into the glass. If you have ever seen an old vacuum tube where it is silvered it is basically the same process ...



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