Road Train !!!!!!!!!!

by Russell McMahon

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13

f/16 will give you sharper image than f/1.4. Yes, diffraction does kick-in at f/16, but it's still not as bad as the optical flaws that are pronounced at f/1.4 in pretty much every f/1.4 lens out there. (see: tests of your particular lens, resolution charts) Also lens coma and astigmatism are worse when lens is wide open than when it's stopped-down. That's ...


10

Unfortunately, this looks very much like whoever changed your headset port has also managed to damage the camera module in some way so that it is massively overexposing. This is very unlikely to be fixable by an amateur - I'd suggest taking it back to the store that changed the headset port and getting them to either fix it or give you a replacement phone, ...


8

I guess that the kit lens is a 18-55 mm f/3,5-5,6 and together with a D90 there is no reason to buy a full-frame camera. It wont solve any of your problems and you'll be able to take this photo with the gear you have without any problems at all. Firstly, you would want to stay away from shooting at f/22. It will not give you sharp images nor the light that ...


7

If so, which would be more advisable? Assuming you don't have stability or motion issues and depth of field is not a concern then f/16 would be more advisable than f/1.4 as ultra-fast lenses show several image degrading aberrations when the aperture is wide open. However f/5.6 would probably be better still, as diffraction starts to kick in past this ...


4

The OP commented elsewhere "I've seen people say it's actually ISO 800 Film intended to be pushed, and their data sheet says something about it being rated ISO 1000" and the data sheet is by far your best source of information. DELTA 3200 Professional has an ISO speed rating of ISO 1000/31ยบ (1000ASA, 31DIN) to daylight. So yes, it is a fast film ...


3

The distance of the objects is not a factor on your decision on the shutter speed. Their relative movement velocity related to the camera as well as your composition intentions and the available light is what really matters. The fact that you ask the question hints that you don't know about the artistic differences between a large aperture and a small one ...


3

Assuming you are using a tripod, the shutter speed will make little difference in itself. If you are hand-holding, a faster shutter speed will help to eliminate shake. You also have the consideration of any moving objects in the scene, like trees, water, or clouds - a slower shutter speed will blur them. However, image quality is rarely at its best at ...


3

Shorter version: Expose it as 3200 and shoot normally. Develop according to the instructions and make sure you use the correct development time for 3200. Longer version: Delta 3200 is not an ISO 3200 film, it is more like ISO 1000-1200. If you expose it as 3200 and develop according to the instructions, you are actually push developing it. The film ...


2

why not simply set it to 3200 and run with it? That's what it's rated at... That said, it's a somewhat flexible film and you may get good results at 1600 as well. There's nothing wrong with doing what the package says you should do. Nor is there anything wrong with experimenting.


2

If the question is meant literally f/1.4 vs f/16, then I would say 16, because there are only handful of lenses that are good enough at f/1.4 to shoot landscape type of photography in great technical quality. But my mindset about setting aperture (for these types of shots or others) is different. In this kind of photography you should set your aperture to: ...


2

It is definitely not possible to use a single severely underexposed image and combine it with itself to get a correctly exposed image. The information is simply not there. The idea of combining multiple exposures is to minimize the noise. If you're using one image the noise will be amplified whereas using many different exposures the noise will, ideally, ...


2

Cities aren't that dark even at night, you equipment should be able to take the picture just fine. Your first problem is that f/22 is a tiny tiny aperture, it lets very little light into the camera - so, to compensate the camera needs a very long exposure and the built in timer only goes up to 30 seconds. I also think you might be mistaking about the ...


1

Skin tones vary wildly, so going by the numbers can only get you into the ballpark at best. At some point, you are going to have to learn to eyeball things (where "eyeball" is understood to be a subjective process carried out on a calibrated monitor so that you have at least a reasonable expectation that what you see on the screen is living in the same ...


1

The answers so far don't seem to talk about bulb mode, which I think should be mentioned: If you want f22 as the aperture, and you want a reasonable ISO so the image isn't too noisy, then the solution to me is to go over the 30 second exposure available with the built in settings, and going into Bulb mode. You can experiment with it without one, but I ...


1

@MirekE has some great advice. I would also add that you can play around with over and under developing easily with your 35mm. Find a scene that shows a wide range of values, ideally a scene where you can set the lens to infinity. The sun should be behind you and over your right or left shoulder. No clouds if possible so the lighting doesn't change suddenly. ...



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