Lightnings taking a ride

by ceinmart

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10

The point of bracketing in the context you described is to come up with a higher dynamic range that the one you can get with a single picture because you want or need to do it. Even if RAW has more bits per channel than JPEG, it still have a limited dynamic range. So depending of the scene you have in front of you, you will want or need to take pictures ...


7

Bracketing is useful when the scene exceeds the dynamic-range of the camera. That is it. There is no answer that applies all the time because it depends on the scene.


6

If I assume that the default 0 EV has reasonable exposure, does this mean that the -1 and +1 RAWs are more or less redundant? If the exposure is reasonable in both the shadows and highlights — that is, the scene has a dynamic range that easily fits within what the camera can capture — then yes, you're right. Bracketed exposure doesn't do much for you. ...


5

I have a Godox V860C light and a Godox Cells II remote trigger. OK, from this, I gather that you have a Canon camera. The Godox V860C is an eTTL-II-capable flash, so if you want to use that capability, it's there. However, the Cells II triggers are manual triggers that do not communicate eTTL information, so with this specific combination you do not ...


4

I've found that bracketing by ±1 or ±2EV doesn't help, but bracketing by ±3EV does. I did the following experiment: First, I picked a high dynamic range scene, short of directly shooting the sun. Here, the sun was partially behind thin clouds, and it was uncomfortably bright to look at with the naked eye. In other words, it was much brighter than it looks ...


4

Let me add the issue of noise to the answers already given. Suppose that the 0 EV exposure is good enough, the shadows are not underexposed, the bright areas are not overexposed, then it's still the case that using the +1 EV exposure (for the parts that are not overexposed) will yield a lower noise picture. By exposing for longer and then adjusting the ...


3

First, it's not a issue of detail or sharpness, but one of signal to noise ratio. Second, instead of asking, why haven't you done the obvious thing and just tried it!? Let's say you ultimately want a post-processed image with 8 bit per color resolution. In theory, that means any additional bits your camera converts color values to represent extra dynamic ...


3

It depends. If the entire dynamic range of the scene can be captured in a single exposure, then it is redundant. If the entire dynamic range of the scene exceeds the capacity of a single exposure, and you wish to capture that entire dynamic range, then you need to bracket. Be aware that a single 14-bit raw file may contain as much dynamic range information ...


3

Yes, this is generally the case. If you fix a value like aperture (which is what you are doing when you set the camera to Av mode), one of the other exposure factors must change — and the only other options are shutter speed and ISO. If you are using automatic ISO, that may or may not change first, according to your specific camera's program line. If you ...


2

A partial answer: Does E-TTL work when the flash is off shoe? I don't think it does. If so, does that mean the E-TTL is pointless whenever shooting off-shoe? You need to set the 3 parts to TTL mode: the flash, the trigger, and the camera. I put the flash in manual mode and on full power (1/1). I should be in manual mode, right? If any of the 3 ...


2

in shutter/aperture priority modes, you are choosing shutter speed OR aperture and the camera is choosing the other 2 inputs that determine exposure; ISO and aperture/shutter speed. The camera makes it's decision on the amount light being detected at the sensor, but the amount of light used in the "decision" is heavily affected by the metering mode which is ...


2

In Aperture Priority mode, you set a chosen aperture and the camera will automatically match the shutter speed so that a correct exposure is produced (according to the metering mode). The exposure indicator will only be shown if you apply an exposure compensation (hold the +/- button and rotate the command dial). By default the exposure compensation is set ...


2

It depends on the camera. Cameras with more dynamic range will give you greater exposure latitude. With standard professional grade DSLRs you get 8-10 stops of latitude. With some cinematic cameras such as the Sony A7S you may be able to get 12 stops. As far as gathering detail from the shadows, a Canon 5D can get 2 maybe 3 stops out of the shadows. In the ...


1

The math on two fstops is the square root of the sum of the two squares, but I don't know about EV. If the lights were equal, and if they lighted the same overlapping area, twice the light is one stop additional. But you say the ambient is 3 stops down from the lamp, so it won't have much effect. This ambient adds less than 0.2 stop increase, not over ...


1

RAW images do not contain all information that could be retrieved from a scene. They simply contain more information than JPEG images. When a photographer chooses to bracket photographs and combine them later, it is usually because the bright and dark areas of their scene are sufficiently different that the camera is not capable of detecting the differences ...


1

Yes. If you are in Aperture Priority mode, you are fixing the aperture where you want it and letting the camera decide the appropriate shutter speed. Thus, if you switch to +1 EC, the shutter will stay open longer.


1

I think logic will tell you what the problem is: When all three modes are used without flash, the image looks the same. When all three modes are used with flash, the images are different. So, let's investigate the flash. Now, what makes a flash work? Well, we have a power source, a xeon bulb, and a large capacitor. More than likely, your batteries ...



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