Serene Life

by garik

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10

If you're shooting RAW, you may have a little (or alot on some newer sensors) of wiggle room with your exposure. But, how your camera metered to measure the light to expose the scene in camera doesn't mean ANYTHING after you take the picture. Spot metering is just how the light meter in your camera thinks it needs to expose the current scene (and for spot ...


8

There's only one exposure level (ie: amount of light) per picture; spot metering just means that the "target" level is based off of a particular area rather than the average of the whole frame (or some fancier means such as matrix). Another means of setting the exposure level is through your manual controls (shutter, aperture, ISO). If you're changing your ...


7

You don't mention if you shot in RAW or JPEG but if it's the former you'll have a lot more latitude in trying to rescue them. If you did shoot RAW, open your files in Photoshop Camera Raw and pull the Recovery slider all the way up to 100. That will show you how far Photoshop is able to rectify the blown highlights from your RAW data. (Unfortunately if you ...


7

Just perform regular post-processing. For reference, here is your first picture with all the boarder fluff stripped off: Simply making the darkest spot black and the lightest white fixes a lot: The snow looks a little yellowish, so here I'm using one area of the snow that looks like it should be white as the white balance reference. I also brought ...


6

The terms push and pull are still relevant in the sense that they are still used and understood by many enthusiast photographers. But they are probably not as common as they once were. New terms, such as expose to the right describe the same concept using different words. If you underexpose when taking the shot, then you push the exposure in editing to ...


6

Exposure correction is using a single image to do something like HDR, but not true HDR. The reason is that you do not have the same dynamic range as three images provides. A true HDR will utilize multiple images, and have much more detail than a single image...meaning you will be able to see many more objects from the shadows of a single image, and you will ...


5

I'm not sure why you awarded that answer. It's absolutely fixable easily with aperture. I've spent less than 5 minutes on this and already got decent result. This is your exposure -2EV: This is what I got to (different from above but it's even better imo): All I did was brush in levels set to: Followed by setting recovery to 0.14 (because some ...


3

Your camera has the ability to manually set the white balance. Under most circumstances, the auto white balance feature works fine, but since it's very likely you're shooting JPEG, correction after the fact when it does get it wrong is probably going to degrade your image quality a bit. at any rate, page 90 of the English version of the manual for your ...


3

You can just test it for yourself: Find a location near your house where you can see both bright sky and deep shadows. Take the 3 bracketed pictures. Make two HDR images, one with the bracketed pictures and one with the images generated from just the middle image raw file This will tell you if the single exposure HDR is good enough with your specific ...


3

The short answer is: It depends entirely on your ability to expose one photo correctly for the environments you'll be shooting. If you can, go with it HDR, if the environments truly do have more dynamic range than your camera can handle, go with bracketing. The longer answer is not so clear - bracketing will generally give you more detail than just one ...


2

What you want is to decrease the amount of light coming off your backdrop so that the backdrop itself is bright enough to appear the way you want it (presumably to clip your sensor so that you get a pure white look) but not bright enough to significantly light up / overexpose your model itself with reflected light. In your example photo, it looks like ...


2

I checked my D7000 and set it up the same way you did - the flash is adjusted - according to the image info in playback mode when I press down. I see +/-1 in the info against flash bias but my aperture is hasnt changed (maybe my cam dosnt think it needs to at these settings) It is the flash that is causing the brightness change - Try dialing in the same ...


2

Exposure, as the name suggests, adjusts the overall exposure, just as if you had exposed the image a little more, or a little less, from the start. So if you move the exposure slider to the right, you add exposure across the entire histogram, shadows and highlights. You basically move the entire histogram to the right. With levels, you set a black, white, ...


2

You can darken parts of an image in Photoshop by adding adjustment layers and then using the mask to show or hide parts of each adjustment layer. Here is a tutorial for adding an adjustment layer: http://psd.tutsplus.com/articles/techniques/a-basic-guide-to-photoshop-cs4-adjustment-layers/ and here is basic info about adjustment layers: ...


1

You might also try "place and fall" as an exposure technique. In traditional photography this usually means exposing for your shadows and letting the midtones and hightlights fall accordingly. With digital, overexposure is more of a problem than under so you can "place" the brightest part of your scene. For instance: in manual mode spotmeter the brightest ...


1

For a shot like this, I would either use evaluative metering and dial in an EC to adjust for any issue the sky provided or I'd do spot metering on the outer leaves of the tree. As it is currently, it looks like it metered too much on the shadows and over exposed slightly, leading to a weak black point and wasted dynamic range in an already very wide dynamic ...


1

Along other expressions like unsharp mask etc. they are used in the digital environment in an analogus way to their classic usage. Most common is "pushing" by correcting to the plus, preferrably while "developing" (another of these expressions) a jpeg or tiff out of a raw. Correction to the minus corresponds to "pulling".


1

For next time, you might want to take a closer look at your manual to figure out how to improve capture. Snow throws off most auto camera settings, and many cameras now have an automatic snow/beach mode to adjust (or at least an exposure adjustment setting), but if you understand what's going on even the basic adjustments available on your camera can be ...


1

There are several things you can do, but almost all of them require taking the camera off of full auto. If you use the P (Program mode) setting, thw camera will still select the aperture and shutter speed for you, but you will be able to select more options for other things, especially White Balance. If you are not allowed to use flash at the gym: Set the ...


1

On auto, the camera tries to automatically adjust the overall tone of the picture. I would expect different sources of the problem: the fluorescent light sources are not all the same, then having mixture of light sources causes troubles at large distance photos, there is some dominant color, which tricks the camera into wrong choice of white balance ...


1

There are two approaches that work for this image: Go to Highlights/Shadows. Enter "150" as the highlights value (or drag it there by dragging over the number, not using the slider handle), probably also increase Mid Contrast to about 20. Brush in that adjustment on just the sign. This looks much like the negative exposure adjustment. Open Levels ...


1

No, that's not possible. The exposure compensation affects how the exposure is measured, so it's applied before the image is taken, not afterwards. You can adjust the image to a certain degree to make it appear correctly exposed, but that means that you are losing something else. If the image is too burnt out, you lose details in bright areas. If it's too ...



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