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8

It appears that the Nikon D90 does record ISO information in the files - I'd suggest the fault is with exiftool.


7

Certainly if you have EXIF tags on your photos, either those written by your digital camera, or those you may have added manual to older photos, this is the way to go. "exiftool" is reliable and supports all of the various formats and tags. For instance, the following command, prints out the creation date of all image files found underneath the 2010 ...


4

% exiftool -Model='Kodak Hawkeye Instamatic' image.nef Further discussion on how to open unsupported files in Opening Unsupported RAW Files.


3

Below is a note from EXIFTools documentation - "1) Some tags (generally tags which may affect the appearance of the image) are considered "unsafe" to write, and are only copied if specified explicitly (ie. no wildcards). See the tag name documentation for more details about "unsafe" tags." Also, see question 9b on this page: ...


3

If you are on Linux or willing to boot a Linux LiveDVD, you can use simple commands for that, something in the line of: find -iname "*.jpg" -print0 | xargs -0 exiftool -a | grep "Image Width" find is used for searching for files, iname is used for case insensitive filename matching, print0 basically uses \0 character terminated filenames as outputs, so ...


3

This is Lightroom-specific metadata, stored in the Lightroom catalog. You can verify this like so: $ exiftool -b -xmp mypic.dng > orig.xmp (now go reject mypic.dng and Cmd/Ctrl-S if necessary) $ exiftool -b -xmp mypic.dng > new.xmp $ diff orig.xmp new.xmp All you'll see are a metadata date change and some UUID changes. This means there is nothing ...


3

Well, if you have good scripting skills, EXIFTool can be made to do this across folders. However, there is a donation-ware plug-in for Lightroom called LensTagger that may do the trick for you.


2

If you use Picasa to organize your collection, you can search by month the photo was taken. For example searching for "November" in the top right search bar shows me all photos taken in the month of November. More info and search options.


2

Try what Itai said, using the Lightroom settings to recognize dot (.) and/or slash(/). However it should be noted that the exporting application you are using is doing it bad, because the exif information exported should be in a list. This list is what any application will first look for. I think your application only creates a single entry with all the ...


2

For Windows, GeoSetter (freeware) can do this. You can select a GPX file, then it will tag the photos based on this. You can also edit tags manually. It can show all of your photos on a map, and set image positions from the map. It has options for saving data in the image files, or as separate sidecar files. It does use ExifTool for saving data.


2

On Mac OS X you can use Exif Editor (http://www.exifeditorapp.com/) from Martin Novak to edit lens data. It's just an interface to exiftool, but it's well designed and lets you define some templates and work on batches fo shots, so you can change or add exif metadata in bulk. I use it often to add lens metadata to shots taken with manual ("vintage") ...


2

Well you can find a list of XMP field names used by common photo software on this page. For example, digiKam uses the TagsList field name in XMP metadata to store its tag hierarchy. So when I mark an image with the "Brighton" sub-tag which is nested under the "East-Sussex" sub-tag, nested under the "UK" sub-tag, nested under the "located" top-level tag, and ...


2

Without color space information, images should be rendered using the sRGB profile. To preserve the color space information, you should preserve the ColorSpace, InteropIndex and ICC_Profile tags.


1

Save the thumbnail first: exiftool -b -ThumbnailImage destination_image.jpg > destination_thumbnail.jpg Then mess with all the metadata (copy from source, write into destination), and meanwhile destroy the destination thumbnail, no problem. E.g. exiftool -tagsFromFile source_image.jpg -XMP:All= -ThumbnailImage= -m destination_image.jpg Note that ...


1

So after a little digging and with the help of Murat's hint I found the following field in some pictures. This basically is the way that Adobe Lightroom stores the information and it could be used as a defacto standard in your project. We already went for a similar solution with our own field name and no use of rdf, but just to close this question here is ...


1

You can suggest to your client to use a Digital Asset Management to manage his image bank. The most modern DAM solutions can automatically save tag hierarchy to XMP. EXIF is mainly used for storing technical camera and image shooting info. Another standard is IPTC but it is obsoleted and has significant limitations to length of the fields. Hiearchical ...


1

I think I found the solution. Picasa has a Tools -> Experimental -> Show duplicate files menu and it seems to work just right.


1

It is in the exif specification: http://www.exiv2.org/tags.html 0xa420 42016 Photo Exif.Photo.ImageUniqueID Ascii This tag indicates an identifier assigned uniquely to each image. It is recorded as an ASCII string equivalent to hexadecimal notation and 128-bit fixed length. It is based on the timestamp and camera serial number, in an encryption ...


1

The default import setting of Lightroom is to organize in folders like that. But if you choose a harddrive as the source it will "add" them in place. But you can just choose "Move" or "Copy". It will skip "suspected dublicates", so if you "move" then you will only have duplicates left. To leave them untoched, also viewing in lightroom, you should mark the ...


1

First, use Lightroom's Save Metadata to File command (in the Metadata menu or via Ctrl/Cmd+S shortcut) to make sure the metadata saved in the JPG or XMP files (including keywords) are in sync with Lightroom's database. Then add the desired EXIF data to the image files (for JPG files) or XMP sidecar files (for raw image files) using exiftool. For instance, ...


1

The EXIF field you're talking about is the LensType field and the value is defined by the manufacturer of the lens. There are a couple of problems with that: The lens must be identifiable. Not all lenses can be, especially older ones, so you can't just put anything there. You could try to find the lens ID of a more modern equivalent, but it's not the same ...


1

I don't believe there is an "official" EXIF tag for lens type. As much as I know about EXIF (which admittedly isn't a ton), I believe Lens Type is a "maker note", or additional OEM-specific settings. I believe you can simply add a LensType tag and stuff the name of the lens in that tag. Most tools should recognize that.


1

This question was re-asked and answered in the ExifTool forum: http://u88.n24.queensu.ca/exiftool/forum/index.php/topic,3465.0.html It looks like LR may be ignoring the XMP in favour of the IPTC.  There are 2 things you can do: 1) delete all IPTC and use XMP only.  (easy, but not as compatible with other software) 2) use exiftool to also ...



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