Train to nowhere

by Jorge Córdoba

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

It appears that the Nikon D90 does record ISO information in the files - I'd suggest the fault is with exiftool.


7

Certainly if you have EXIF tags on your photos, either those written by your digital camera, or those you may have added manual to older photos, this is the way to go. "exiftool" is reliable and supports all of the various formats and tags. For instance, the following command, prints out the creation date of all image files found underneath the 2010 ...


5

% exiftool -Model='Kodak Hawkeye Instamatic' image.nef Further discussion on how to open unsupported files in Opening Unsupported RAW Files.


5

This is Lightroom-specific metadata, stored in the Lightroom catalog. You can verify this with this command1 in the OS X Terminal: $ exiftool -b -xmp mypic.dng > orig.xmp Now go back to Lightroom reject mypic.dng and hit ⌘/Ctrl-S to force Lightroom to sync its copy of the metadata to the photo file on disk.2 Back in the Terminal, say: $ exiftool -b ...


5

From the man page: -s (-short) Short output format. Prints tag names instead of descriptions. Add up to 3 -s options for even shorter formats: -s - print tag names instead of descriptions -s -s - no extra spaces to column-align values -s -s -s - print values only so, exiftool -s -s -s ...


5

There's already a similar question on the ExifTool forums. It can be done using two sequential ExifTool commands. First, make sure all the date to the same exiftool -datetimeoriginal="2015:02:22 00:00:00" DIR And then increment the time on each exiftool '-datetimeoriginal+<0:0:${filesequence}0' DIR


4

ExifTool could do this, but the use of negative coordinates might make it a two step procedure depending upon what tags you want to use. XMP gps tags will take negative coordinates, but EXIF gps tags only accept positive numbers and need the directional reference tag to be accurate. First off, there would have to be some changes to CSV. The first row ...


4

No. PNG does not support EXIF. In fact, lack of a standardized metadata block is one of its big disadvantages for photography. If you need a lossless format which preserves (very-similar-to-EXIF, since it's the basis for EXIF) metadata, try TIFF. The downside, though, is that TIFF rendering support is not as widespread as that for PNG (for web applications ...


3

If you want Hugin to auto-recognize and correct for the lens, then probably the right tag to use is Samyang 8mm f/3.5 Fish-Eye CS, because this is the entry in the lensfun database, which is now integrated into Hugin use. In the slr-samyang.xml file the entry is: <lensdatabase version="1"> <lens> <maker>Samyang</maker> ...


3

Below is a note from EXIFTools documentation - "1) Some tags (generally tags which may affect the appearance of the image) are considered "unsafe" to write, and are only copied if specified explicitly (ie. no wildcards). See the tag name documentation for more details about "unsafe" tags." Also, see question 9b on this page: ...


3

If you are on Linux or willing to boot a Linux LiveDVD, you can use simple commands for that, something in the line of: find -iname "*.jpg" -print0 | xargs -0 exiftool -a | grep "Image Width" find is used for searching for files, iname is used for case insensitive filename matching, print0 basically uses \0 character terminated filenames as outputs, so ...


3

Without color space information, images should be rendered using the sRGB profile. To preserve the color space information, you should preserve the ColorSpace, InteropIndex and ICC_Profile tags.


3

Well, if you have good scripting skills, EXIFTool can be made to do this across folders. However, there is a donation-ware plug-in for Lightroom called LensTagger that may do the trick for you.


3

First, use Lightroom's Save Metadata to File command (in the Metadata menu or via Ctrl/Cmd+S shortcut) to make sure the metadata saved in the JPG or XMP files (including keywords) are in sync with Lightroom's database. Then add the desired EXIF data to the image files (for JPG files) or XMP sidecar files (for raw image files) using exiftool. For instance, ...


3

The EXIF field you're talking about is the LensType field and the value is defined by the manufacturer of the lens. There are a couple of problems with that: The lens must be identifiable. Not all lenses can be, especially older ones, so you can't just put anything there. You could try to find the lens ID of a more modern equivalent, but it's not the same ...


3

This online calculator calls this "Mach Absolute Time" (couldn't find a lot info about this) and can convert your value to a standard representation, which gives UTC / GMT: 25.12.2011 13:53:58, just for the integer portion, though. This SO answer explains that this is unix with a different base, convert by adding 978307200 (2001-1970) EDIT: oh, be aware ...


2

If you use Picasa to organize your collection, you can search by month the photo was taken. For example searching for "November" in the top right search bar shows me all photos taken in the month of November. More info and search options.


2

Try what Itai said, using the Lightroom settings to recognize dot (.) and/or slash(/). However it should be noted that the exporting application you are using is doing it bad, because the exif information exported should be in a list. This list is what any application will first look for. I think your application only creates a single entry with all the ...


2

The default import setting of Lightroom is to organize in folders like that. But if you choose a harddrive as the source it will "add" them in place. But you can just choose "Move" or "Copy". It will skip "suspected dublicates", so if you "move" then you will only have duplicates left. To leave them untoched, also viewing in lightroom, you should mark the ...


2

On Mac OS X you can use Exif Editor (http://www.exifeditorapp.com/) from Martin Novak to edit lens data. It's just an interface to exiftool, but it's well designed and lets you define some templates and work on batches fo shots, so you can change or add exif metadata in bulk. I use it often to add lens metadata to shots taken with manual ("vintage") ...


2

For Windows, GeoSetter (freeware) can do this. You can select a GPX file, then it will tag the photos based on this. You can also edit tags manually. It can show all of your photos on a map, and set image positions from the map. It has options for saving data in the image files, or as separate sidecar files. It does use ExifTool for saving data.


2

So after a little digging and with the help of Murat's hint I found the following field in some pictures. This basically is the way that Adobe Lightroom stores the information and it could be used as a defacto standard in your project. We already went for a similar solution with our own field name and no use of rdf, but just to close this question here is ...


2

Well you can find a list of XMP field names used by common photo software on this page. For example, digiKam uses the TagsList field name in XMP metadata to store its tag hierarchy. So when I mark an image with the "Brighton" sub-tag which is nested under the "East-Sussex" sub-tag, nested under the "UK" sub-tag, nested under the "located" top-level tag, and ...


2

Doesn't work on many files (more than 100, depends on the length of file paths) That's due to a hard limit in Windows on the length of a command line. The plugin is trying to name all of the photos you've selected in a single ExifTool instantiation.1 The only thing you can do about this is upgrade to Windows 7+, if you haven't already. The limit in XP ...


2

There is often proprietary information in the EXIF maker notes that many metadata utilities can not read. ExifTool (http://exiftool.com) is one of the better utilities, but it still can not read everything. Use the -u option to also extract some of the unknown information. Regarding your question about detecting an altered image: It is often possible to ...


2

Well, I didn't post my bash answer because the question specifically asked about a Windows solution, but since two other people did, here's what I came up with: for file in *.jpg do exiftool -DateTimeOriginal="1111:11:11 00:00:00" $file exiftool -DateTimeOriginal+="00:00:${file:6:4}0" $file done Avoids messing with the date command. :) Note that in ...


2

The problem is that the metadata that Windows uses as the "Date Taken" varies by file. For example, for a JPG, Windows will use Exif:DateTimeOriginal if it exists, followed by XMP:DateTimeOriginal, followed by CreateDate, followed by FileCreateDate (the system file create date). (Off topic, if anyone has a link that lists details of all the types of files ...


1

I want to add the correct EXIF lens metadata... A lens not designed to communicate with the camera won't have EXIF data which would be deemed "correct" because the manufacturer didn't assign anything. If there's a community of Rokinon users, you might ask around to see if there's a string people are using for your lens so any profiles you get from ...


1

You should be able to do some more crazy perl expressions inside those {}s. (I'd be more tempted to write something this complex in another language, actually, but for the sake of argument): ${CreateDate; use Date::Parse; @vals = strptime($_); sprintf("%-04d_%-02d_...", $vals[5], $vals[4]);} Note: completely untested code. I doubt it works. But it ...


1

Full applications may not show all the metadata in a image. Reasons may include that particular information is not relevant to the app's purpose, it was not designed to handle some metadata tags, and displaying everything would be too much clutter. Surly none of this is surprising!?



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible