Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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0

This is available on quite a few cameras, including even some point-and-shoot ultra-compacts. There is no rule to tell you which model has it, so you must check the specifications on the manufacturer's web site for models you are interested in. This is a more common option on Canon cameras across the board. Even a tiny Powershot ELPH 115 has that. Olympus ...


1

For Mid Range (and high end) Canon DSLRs you can download a piece of firmware called Magic Lantern which does what you described above, and more. I don't use it myself but I've had photographic friends raving about it. The only downside to consider, is that there is some debate whether or not installing custom firmware voids the cameras warranty, so do your ...


1

You can do this with any camera that has a connector for a wired remote shutter release. The vast majority of DSLRs currently on the market have such a connector. You just need a cable release that includes an intervalometer. They are widely available with the various shaped connectors for different camera models. This one comes with various adapter ends ...


3

Umbrellas work just fine with speedlights. The light from a speedlight is not too directed for that, especially if you use white umbrellas which will spread the light more or less independently of which direction it came from. I will echo James's comment to check out Strobist.com for info on how to make good use of off-camera speedlights. The most useful ...


1

From my own experience, I can make the following recommendations. You should practice handling your tripod and camera in dark conditions. This will help you to set up the camera and tripod quickly or to change camera settings when your hands are slowly going numb in the ice cold conditions. The problem here is that when handeling the camera, you need to ...


0

Buy a lens assembly online for about $60 and have a go of replacing it yourself. My G11 lens has jammed up and I plan to do this. Or buy a brand new G16 which retails for under $500


1

You'll need a lens with a minimum focus distance small enough to accommodate your rig. (See also How close can a lens focus?) There are several ways to accomplish this. Your secondary macro lens, which mounts on the front of the existing lens, is one way to accomplish this, but won't necessarily be sufficient and certainly won't give the best image quality. ...


3

When it comes to diffusers you should be looking to use the same sizes as you would for monolights. The flash tube of a monolight often isn't that much larger than the head of a speedlight and the size of the modifier is mainly what creates the effect. This is echoed by the soft mods section in Strobist blog's gear recommendations. Strobist blog is highly ...


0

I've used two things. One is Promaster SystemPRO clamper that comes in different sizes, can be used like a mini pod and clamps onto lots of things. And it can be used for strobes. Another a low cost and light weight solution consists of a 7/8" washer, nylons string measured to near your floor to eye height, and a small bolt with the same thread as the ...


1

Sounds like you need some laboratory equipment. I bet you could find what you need here... (but this stuff is generally smaller than the stuff you linked, designed to be used on a table top - it is extremely versatile) http://www.grainger.com/category/laboratory-clamps-and-supports/lab-equipment/lab-supplies/ecatalog/N-ks0 You are talking about a pretty ...


0

I think that Itai has covered it pretty well. However it's worth remembering that another contender is likely to be only a couple of months away; the 40-150 f/2.8 pro lens from Olympus which, last I heard, is due out in September. (Referred to in the brochure that can be found here.) Depending on: (a) How much you need a lens now (I'd assume that you ...


0

Things to consider: How to you plan to use it? Is it for just saving memories of some events or more than that? Do plan to use it for some serious hobby and want to extend into using more gadgets and with other equipment or not? Are all functions working properly? Even if it's a newer model or a later date of import, functionality is always a ...


3

Is it wise? Well, probably the wise thing to do is to sell all of your electronics, camera gear included, and live a quiet life of mediation and peace. Or, is it a smart investment? Again, neither of these options is really the best. Better to sell it all and pick up a nice low-overhead index fund. But, photography is an art. Art is not wise (even if it ...


1

It probably isn't as big of a deal to switch as you think. It is fairly common when switching systems to sell off the old system and re-buy lenses in the new system. You do take a hit when off-loading the old lenses for the old system, but it still lets you get back up and running on the new system pretty quickly. It isn't trivial, but it also isn't too ...


0

Since you mentioned you're a student. I'll assume budget is a factor. With that in mind, have you considered cost of switching to Canon i.e. assume you sell off all your existing Sony gear at a fair price, will the proceeds be enough to buy equivalent lens for the type of photography you do. After all, the last thing you need is to switch and not be able to ...


2

Don't worry — it's not fresh fruit. As Esa notes, the main thing that might be time-dependent is the battery life, because lithium batteries lose capacity over time even when not in use. However, it's likely that the battery was packaged in a state that minimizes this. I wouldn't worry about it. (A second new battery is nice to have anyway, by the way — ...


3

I see no problem there. The only thing that might get affected by this length of time is the battery, and even that is most likely good as new as long as you received the camera in an unopened package and the battery was in its own little plastic bag straight out of the assembly line. The firmware version is likely the first version of this model. You ...


-3

Save up and get a Full Frame Camera, Then start thinking about new lenses. The sharpest APS-C camera won't give images as sharp as a Full Frame camera. I just sold my Canon 7D and bought a 2nd hand 5D. The same cheap old "Nifty Fifty" lens is now MUCH sharper. Good glass can't beat a Larger sensor (under most circumstances)


0

I specialise in photographing paintings and most of the above are good suggestions. Definitely start with a white balance for the lighting you are using and for super accurate colours a Q card OR colour checker passport would be essential. BUT all this is out of the window and a complete waste of time unless your monitor is calibrated. The mention of ...


1

Traditionally the technique for photographing prints and paintings is called "cross polarization", where you have polarizing filters on both the lens and the light sources. This helps prevent glare (which washes out detail and color). The setup is a little complicated, but you want two lights set at 45 degree angles from the artwork, and the camera set back ...


2

Filters will definitely help, contrary to the other answers. Let me explain this (and I assume that you shoot in RAW. the only proper way to go.) Let's say you have an average RGB value of (95%, 25%, 10%) through the entire picture. This is basically a heavy red color cast over the image. Now, RED is being digitized using the ~95-100% of the dynamic range ...


2

The problem is most likely white balance. Your camera can't tell the different between a grey painting in red light and a red painting in white light. If it sees a lot of red, it'll probably assume it's in red-ish light and will "correct" away some of the redness. A simple solution is to photograph a piece of white paper or plastic (make sure it really is ...


1

Generally, if you do not already know what to buy - then you should not buy anything. I'd suggest to look thoroughly into learning more about photography in general instead. As you're "on" with that you will - with time - find out exactly what you're lacking/missing... and by that learn what to look for in an eventual new camera - if you get to that ...


3

I'd recommend getting a colour swatch such as the X-Rite Color Checker Passport. If you take a photo of your painting with the device in shot, this acts as a reference for all other photos taken with the same lens and lighting conditions, and ensures the colours are as accurate as possible. The device comes with a stand-alone application and a Lightroom ...


9

Probably not. Color filters can be useful when you want to get a certain look in a black and white photograph, but usually don't enhance color. That's because they are inherently restrictive — they subtract colors from the scene. Probably what you need is a) better lighting on the painting and b) to shoot in Raw so you can make careful adjustments to bring ...


3

What you basically want to looking for in the specs are the macro capabilities of the camera. A bridge camera may or may not be your best choice, here, particularly if you want to handhold the camera for the shots. Bridge cameras (the ones that look like dSLRs and are typically marketed by how big the zoom factor is), tend to trade off reach for low light ...


1

For shooting small models, the most important thing is going to be the magnification of the camera. Magnification relates to how large it is possible to make something small appear in a photo. It is related to the sensor size, the focal length and the minimum focus distance (the minimum distance at which the camera can focus). Both cameras have roughly ...



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