Butterfly

by Rodrigo

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0

I am new to this site, but am well-versed in photog so this is a great match. First, you have a wonderful camera and lens to begin with. I'm Nikon all the way now, but used the 5d Mark2 and the 17-40L for my wide-angle shots when I was a Canon owner. Now, they've come out with many better lenses. Personally, for true landscape shots I'd never suggest ...


0

Nice idea. In a tour of Dr. Phil Mason's lair, he we see cameras indoors at windows, covered with a box and black cloth. This Video includes three time-lapse views in different directions. The weatherproofing enclosure is the house! Since the point is to show the analemma which has the sun move left and right, you do want to, expose at 24 hour ...


0

There are remote shutter release cords for most cameras fro less than US$10, and even inexpensive intervalometers, such as this for less than US$20:http://www.amazon.com/Neewer-Shutter-Release-Remote-Control/dp/B003Q9RERY/. You might want to do something more complex, though, such as taking the photo at exactly Noon each day, which is not precisely 24 ...


1

The tripod should be one that is rated to the weight of your camera, plus lens, plus head. It should also have the required height without the column extended, at least within a few inches as most heads are at least 4" (10cm) tall. The exact models to match this change regularly, so you will have to search the manufacturer's site. Manfrotto and Gitzo, both ...


3

If the pictures were not blurry, it's not the fault of the tripod that the stitching was uneven or looked crooked. All that a tripod does is lock the camera and lens in a fixed position. It will not magically make your panoramas work. Your conclusion that you need a new tripod is very likely wrong. Your camera and lens together should be rotated around a ...


1

The sturdiness and stability of a tripod has little to do with the "perfect precision" required to shoot 360x180 panos with no parallax error (i.e., causes breaks in seams in the stitch). In fact, the tripod itself has little to do with this. That's more up to the panorama head choice and calibration* you make to put on top of the tripod. Leveling also ...


6

When looking for a wide angle lens you should consider a few very important things: Focal length Image Quality Maximum Aperture Focus modes (AF/MF) Filter compatibility Feature set (FTM, IS, USM, etc.) Mount Weight, size, cost, etc. Intended usage Distortion & Projection Flare resistance Most of the above is not uniquely important to wide angle ...


0

Alaska has amazing photographic opportunities, but the weather does not always cooperate. It is a good idea to be prepared for the worst conditions, and that may affect your lens selection as well. As far as wildlife photography, be ready for close encounters (especially when driving a car or riding the bus in Denali), but most opportunities will require ...


0

On a trip to West Africa I packed a D80, an 18-200mm, and a small bog-standard 28mm for walking around urban stuff. I didn't want to carry a full tele, and on a cropped sensor that 200 was long enough for me. So, it really depends on how much you want to pack. For big vistas I'd like a super-wide, but then I'd also want a full-frame sensor. In my case, I ...


1

I marked this to be closed as its primarily opinion based. Personally, I would much prefer to have a 10-24 and 70-300 over the 18-200. For me, for such an awesome trip, 18 wouldn't be wide enough to make me happy and 200 wouldn't be long enough. (300 wouldn't be long enough, either, but thinking about staying light...) It's a personal choice. Your ...


0

I'd go with the G10 (presumably using CHDK) with a large SD card and an AC adapter. I've used a similar setup to create timelapse films of over 10,000 captures a day of full resolution JPG and RAW files. My setup was different in that I used a G7, then a G9 and now several G1Xs. I think all of these cameras are rated for a life of 100,000 shutter ...


7

Before I start: Past a certain point (where the camera does not limit the ability of the photographer to take the photos they want to), it is the photographer who makes a photograph good (with composition etc.), NOT the camera. This question is one only you can answer completely, however, as always, guidance on where to begin can help. Below I have made a ...


1

In general, I think you want something that has manual and semi-manual modes easily available so you can experiment and grow those skills, but still have full auto and be something you will carry around all the time. Certain classes of cameras have manual settings, and others have dropped them completely so it's hard to find a pocket p&s that can go ...


0

I'd just get one of the tele primes. The Olympus 45mm f/1.8 or 75mm f/1.8 are great little lenses. Just carrying one (like the 75mm) in your pocket let's you swap longer without carrying too much gear and gives you a way faster lens than zoom types ever do.


2

For your purpose — product photography for a webshop — I don't think you actually need very high color accuracy, as long as it's within a reasonable human tolerance. And, since you control the lighting (right?), for that, all you really need is consistency — something that will let you set a white balance manually, or shoot in RAW. Set up a color profile, ...


1

The Canon 1D X has a shutter durability rating of 400,000 shots. You just said "thousands of pictures per day". You could likely get 400,000 shots out of the body, and potentially even more. But once that threshold is passed and failure occurs, you of course don't have to throw away the camera. You might be able to get 100 days out of a 1D X shooting 3-4k ...


1

Rent equipment for the trip. Look at existing photos to see what stuff they used. Do they hold steady enough for time exposures? That will open your options considerably (and lower the price): instead of very 'fast' lenses, spend money on support equipment. Steady is the key, even with wind and people walking around and vibrations and such. Use a ...


1

I highly recommend a sling strap, which lets you carry your camera comfortably at your side and allows to shoot without any awkward strap dangling in front of you. There are $60 brand models out there, but i got one for €4,38 from ebay, including p&p, and i'm very pleased with it. (that's a hit-and-miss thing with those cheap chinese stuff, though)


0

If the lights are bright enough where you are located, you could use any camera and a GoPro would certainly fall under that umbrella. The most current GoPros have steadily been improving in low light abilities so you might want to consider that when you purchase one. Will a GoPro be the best at capturing the aurora? Far from it, but it is certainly possible. ...


1

Looking at the specifications for the Hero 4, I don't see any reason it cannot be used. They offer a night mode with time lapse functionality that allows for exposures for up to 30 seconds. The key to successful shots there will be stability of the camera, just make sure it is firmly in place and then go to work.


0

The Sony TCs are designed specifically for Sony G lenses and CANNOT be used with other lenses without risk of damaging both the lens and the TC - this is due to the extremely tight tolerance (about a mm gap) between the lens' rear glass and the TC's front glass. Likewise the new Sigma APO TCs are specifically tailored for a limited set of lenses such as the ...


0

I have my sigma 17-55 f2.8 almost always on my APS-C camera. Depending on the what you want to photograph, a pancake lens can be an option.


0

From what I understand choice of lens largely depends on where you want to be. If you want to be in the scene, right there with your subjects, 50mm and wider lenses will be your choice. If you want to be out of your scene, and have it largely unaffected by your presence, medium telephoto lenses is your choice. (Personally I prefer 85/1.8.)


4

This is very much a matter of preference and taste. Henri Cartier-Bresson was inseparable from his 50. The same holds for Jean Gaumy. On the other hand photographers like Bruce Davidson and Joel Meyerowitz seem to have a preference for wider lenses like 35 and even 28. One thing is sure: Any focal length longer than 50 is not an option. An 85 will make great ...


0

I am (amongst too many other things) a 'Street Photography' enthusiast. The following is based on 'what works for me'. Tastes vary. For an APS-C camera I very strongly recommend a zoom with a minimum focal length of around 17 or 18 mm and a top end of as much as you can afford at the quality level desired. ie 17-55 mm is an excellent start, but 17-100+ mm ...


3

Gear-wise, the list is pretty simple. You need a flash and a way to trigger it remotely and a way to control the power output of the flash. This typically means a flash with manual power control and cheap radio triggers of some kind. This will then be followed by a need to position the flash where/how you want it and some type of diffuser, which leads to a ...


3

What to look for? It really doesn't matter, as long as it has a manual mode. I'd get 2-3 Yongnuo flash units and some decent accessories such as transmitters, triggers, stands, reflectors, umbrellas, etc. as well for that budget. But if you can find just about any manual flash a friend or family member has lying around; it can certainly keep you busy ...


1

For street photography, using a long focal length can be a little crippling because you might lose some of the interesting perspectives given by shorter focal length lenses. Another thing to note is that with a short focal length lens, you can compose people into the frame and make it look like you're not really aiming at that person. If I see someone ...


4

I think this is pretty well covered on the second page of Strobist 101: here's what your flash absolutely has to have: The ability to work in manual mode, and to do so at different power settings. (I.e., full power, ½ power, ¼ power, etc.) [...] If your flash has that, skip buying another flash for right now until you have a chance to play with the gear ...


3

In my humble opinion you indeed can start with 2 lights and octoboxes, but for a low key portrait. For a High Key I recomend at least 3 lights. In the example you are showing you can put a light above the subject and a reflector below him, and you can use the second one to light the background (that will make 2). But a third one will give you a lot of ...


4

There are two basic techniques in the photo you reference: First, it uses "clamshell" or "butterfly" lighting — see What is butterfly lighting, and when do I use it? for more. You can easily see this from the highlights in the model's pupils. The resolution is low enough that I can't tell if the fill light (from underneath) is a reflector or an actual ...



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