Lightnings taking a ride

by ceinmart

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3

Most "true" macro lenses (i.e., those that can achieve 1:1 magnification; that is the image on the sensor is the same size as in real life) can double as extremely sharp portrait lenses, since most of them are f/2.8 longer primes. However, they'll cost quite a bit more than "a few hundreds" (most seem to be in the $400-$1000 range). There might be some ...


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Pentax 50mm has the nicest bokeh and sharpness I've ever see... I think you've answered your question. Stick with image quality over anything else. You can always make up for other deficiencies with skill and technique. Shoot for best image quality.


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If you are going to make mostly portraits, a 50mm prime would fit you much better. Not only gives you a lower aperture, but the image quality is better with primes. Don't worry about the "ideal" 70-90mm range, 50mm is a classic focal length for portraits.


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Use 50mm if you want to separate the person from the bacground, you can always crop the image to simulate the 70mm (at 8Mpix) or 90mm (at 5Mpix). To include enviroment use 17-50/2.8 at smaller focus distances. And take telezoom for larger distances. You may found usefull to experiment with http://camerasim.com/apps/camera-simulator/


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(I am teasing you:) You seem to be seeking a hard rule that you can apply without thinking, but there are no hard rules, certainly no One rule, and thinking is always helpful. :) It always depends, on the situation, and on what result you want. 70-90 mm is "ideal", if assuming a cropped APS sensor, and assuming a normal subject distance of at least 6 to ...


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It also depends on how much background do you want to keep. With the Pentax prime or Tamron zoom lens, you'll get a better background separation, in addition to having more backdrop behind your subject. This will arguably be nicer as the bokeh effect will be more apparent (more concentric circles, soft focus etc.). On the other hand, if you want to get ...


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I think that taking a head and shoulders picture with a 50mm lens means that you have to get too close for your subject's comfort and in addition risk some distortion. I've always used 90mm prime lenses with as fast an apeture as my bank balance will permit. As usual with photography, it's a trade off - it's a great lens but I have to move around a good ...


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I found the basic kit zoom very limiting, to the point where I don't use my camera as much as I hoped I would. I probably won't until I budget for additional lenses, which unfortunately probably won't happen until the year after next. My old film SLR rigs would involve a wide prime, a "standard" prime and a reasonably fast telephoto zoom, beginning with the ...


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Will I regret not being able to zoom 10×? The short answer is "depends on yourself", and the longer answer is to ask yourself how many of your existing photos taken at "10x zoom" do you really like? For these, is it a matter of physical barriers (e.g. behind fences) or the background separation (i.e. creating bokeh given the wide depth-of-field on your ...


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While it isn't as wide you might want I get my best aurora photos using a Sigma 16-35 F1.8. Reasonably priced (under $1000) lens and both its image quality and construction are superb. Fast enough shutter speeds to avoid the 'soft' images that come with longer exposures without needing to push ISO. If you can live with 16mm its an awesome aurora\Milky Way ...


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You won't really miss the fact that you can't super-zoom once you start using a DSLR. Cameras these days have good enough sensors which can shoot high resolution shots. And cropping them will still produce high quality photos. What I'd recommend is buy a camera that you believe will suit your shooting requirements and stick with the kit lens (18-55mm) for ...


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Will I regret not being able to zoom 10x :( Nobody can tell except yourself. Rent the D5500 with the AF-S DX 18-55mm VR II and try it out. I really like the vary angle LCD thing and the fact its lighter and has wifi built in Just like big optical zoom, these are not exactly the main features of a DSLR. You should consider all features of both ...


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Of course you should consider them but in the end of the day budget will dictate what you buy and there are no two ways about it. I shoot very similar things to what you are asking about with a DSLR (Nikon D3300) so ill offer some advice from my experience, and some suggestions on why I like a DSLR for these shots. Interchangeable lenses: The dSLR (or ...


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It's entirely up to you, of course, and there's nothing wrong with upgrading as far as your wallet will allow. The question I always ask myself when considering and upgrade is: What do I want to do in my photography that is limited by my current camera and will this new camera address that to my satisfaction? Answering that honestly will keep you from buying ...


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No, you're not wasting your time considering a dSLR, but you may want to consider looking at older used models, and possibly into mirrorless cameras if you're on that tight of a budget. A bridge camera can do several things a dSLR cannot without specialized lenses, such as supertelephoto and macro shooting, so you do have to weigh just how much you plan on ...


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Almost any digital camera should last several years. It does not matter if it is a bridge or DSLR, or even a compact. More expensive ones are usually more sturdy but I still have several digital cameras which are 5+ years old and work well. They were replaced becuase something better came along not because one stopped working. Since you mentioned astro ...


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For use with a telescope (or microscope), removable lenses are desirable. For convenience when traveling, "bridge" cameras offer fairly good resolution and choice of focal length without the need to buy and to carry additional lenses. The prices for high-end bridge cameras and low-end DSLR's (or mirrorless removable lens cameras) overlap, so this is really a ...


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I would consider a shoot through umbrella that also can be used with a cover as an umbrella to reflect the light to be the most versatile. For portraits you can do a lot with an umbrella and a bare flash, of course you'll need to flash units for that. On camera I wouldn't waste your money on a Fong Bong, just make sure your flash can rotate properly and ...



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