Napioa - Wind Origins

Napioa - Wind Origins
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0

I am a Nikon man now, but at University we used Pentax ME-Supers (they were the 35mm camera of choice) and I love them. I had a girlfriend at the time who owned one, and I later bought one myself. I was later given a Pentax P30, which is nice but although it has some neat features, it actually lacks something that the older ME Super has. I've also ...


6

Many of us grizzled old-timers like to boast about how we started with film in the era before autofocus existed and how it forced us to learn how to be real photographers. (The ranks of those who learned in the era before auto exposure are much thinner than they were just a decade or so ago.) But the reason we did so was because it was the only way to start ...


3

The Canon A-E1 is a great 35mm starter camera. All of the manual controls are straight forward and new digital SLR cameras share similar functions. Lenses and accessories are easy to find online and at pawn/thrift stores. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canon_AE-1


1

The Nikon ED AF-S VR-NIKKOR 70-200mm 1:2.8G combined with a 2x teleconverter is probably the best choice overall, I have the Sigma 50-500mm myself, it very heavy, and it's very dark. The VR/IS is fair but you will still need good light, if you wish to keep ISO down. It's soft on the long end, so 70-200 2.8 with a teleconverter will probably be round the ...


3

I live in Alaska and have shot assignments involving bears for the US Forest Service and the NY Times [ for example ]. In Alaska photographing bears can mean many things. If you end up someplace like Brooks Camp in Katmai, you can actually get quite close to the bears because you are shooting from platforms around habituated animals. Other places you will ...


0

Are super cheap flashes worth it? In certain usage situations, absolutely. If you are a hobbyist and don't need rock-solid reliability or plan on super-hard usage If the cost-savings is worth entering a copy/component quality lottery If you don't mind being an early beta tester with new models If you don't mind Chinese reverse-engineering issues ...


5

Sometimes the circumstance under which you are shooting trumps distinctions between the optical quality of one lens over another, even when there is significant difference in the optical quality of the lenses in question. This is one of those times. When shooting subject matter such as bears in the wilds of Alaska, focal length is the key consideration. ...


2

It is important whether you use it with a crop or a full frame camera and where in Alaska you go. But in general 200 or even 300 mm is not enough. Get the longest lens, do research and make reservations.


3

We can rule out the 70-300 right off. It's noisy and not great optically. I would take the 70-200 Nikkor as it's got good glass, big aperture and VR but is no good for landscape shots. The Sigma will handle the wide and very long ends but you are right that the compromises needed to make a 50-500 lens are going to result in poorer images. That really ...


6

I'd say that if you have to ask which lens would be most suitable, you're probably going to want the range of the Sigma 50-500mm. The 70-200mm f/2.8 is the best of the lenses you listed. The 70-300mm D has gone through a couple updates over the years, so compared to the other 2, it's a bit dated. But because you're not exactly sure of what you'll be seeing, ...


1

One note, the Zeiss Batis is f/1.8 while the G master and Nikkor is f/1.4, so Batis is if nothing else a bit slower. My guess will be, although I don't know, the Batis is sharper than the other two. As to the Nikkor not having AF, well is all about using a smart adapter. You can get this smart adapter if you wish AF with your Nikon lenses on E-mount: ...


0

I'll recommend the Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8, it's a very good all-purpose lens for FF. Any zoom will be a compromise compared to your prime 50mm f/1.8, but obviously you gain some flexibility.


0

I'm using my kit lens AF-S NIKKOR 24-120mm f/4G ED VR with Nikon D750, and I'm very happy with it. This lens will give you both Wide as well as Telephoto experience. It produce very good and sharp images. You can try it. Happy Photography!!! Regards, Vikas Aggarwal


0

Square/rectangular is better. Round is generally cheaper. The biggest advantage of square/rectangular filters is with graduated ND filters. They are usually rectangular and can be slid up or down on the holder to move the line between the darker and lighter sides of the frame. This allows more compositional freedom. With a screw-on graduated Neutral Density ...


0

Landscapes may benefit from the use of neutral density and circular polarising filters. Neutral density filters are used to equally modify the different wavelengths of light. The purpose of these filters is to help the photographer to extend the exposure time. A common use is to freeze a waterfall... The shutter speed may be fast enough to render the ...


0

The OP asked for a 35mm scanner. Depending on the quantity of originals to scan, a dedicated 35mm scanner may prove faster (in relative terms). I have a Canon 35mm scanner and an Epson V600. Both use either Silverfast or Vuescan. I can understand the RAW requirement, but for all intent and purposes a TIFF file will do as well. Color slides and negatives are ...


0

The square filters are generally of better quality, and have tons of variety, and are more versatile. But since it seems you're just starting out with them, perhaps some easier to use and cheap screw-on filters would be good to start out with. Sets of NDs and even ND graduated filters can be had inexpensively, and produce some darn good results. And are ...


0

Any scanner will do provided it can scan transparencies as well as photographs. I have not run Linux since the days of the very early Red Hat distributions. I cannot help with scanning software. In the non-Linux world I would suggest something professional in the way of scanning software such as Silverfast. Vuescan is also an excellent piece of software and ...


2

I scan negatives and slides to create RAW files. It is largely a matter of scanner resolution limits and software. I use an Epson V700 which has a transparency scanner, film holders and a selection of software. It also can scan natively to 6400 pixels per inch. The software I use is Silverfast and Vuescan. Scanning film at sufficient resolution can be a ...


0

I know my answer comes years late but if anyone here in the future is looking into this I have just a couple suggestions. EF lenses (red dot) do work on any Canon EOS camera film or digital. Film is a lot of fun and I encourage anyone to try it. You would get a lot out of a junior college film course. You will learn to shoot and also how to develop and ...


1

Some people have asked me to suggest them a DSLR for taking photographs of their family and day to day life. These people are not interested in learning photography. It seems they are under an impression that a DSLR will automatically take great photographs. I'm going to go against the flow and disagree with many here in that I see absolutely no ...


-3

What should be recommended for such people? There are a number of camera brands that do not get enough exposure and appreciation because of the huge market share of a few manufacturers but still are important for camera development and should be supported. One of them is Pentax/Ricoh which does not have too much funds for advertising itself against ...


1

If you want something that does low light and fast autofocus, chances are good you'll need to double or triple your budget and get a substantially different type of camera. The bridge cameras you're looking at are built to be low-cost versatile superzooms, where most of the money has gone to getting you super long reach. But it gets there with a combination ...


3

If you are serious about fast autofocus and low-light performance, you will have to consider cameras which can satisfy those needs. You cannot decide between models when neither distinguishes itself for your needs. Low light performance requires a larger sensor. Incidentally, more sensitive cameras often autofocus faster too. The other major factor is the ...


0

Given the two choices you list I would definitely go with the Nikon. It is far and away a better camera and much better for learning photography. There are many old lenses that you can get for it to expand your shooting options, but more importantly, you can and should use it in full manual mode to learn the relationship of how exposure is affected by ...


1

This is probably not the answer you are looking for but here I go. I really do not understand your dilema. Do you really want to learn film photography (i.e., do you want to learn how to develop and process film)? If yes, then either camera will work fine for you. Do you already know photography (i.e., composition, exposure, focal length, DOF)? If no, ...


0

A new Pentax K50 w/ 18-55mm kit lens would be under budget. Is a great camera for any novice or intermediate photographer. Combine that with Adobe lightroom and you'll get some stunning results.


7

It's utterly sane to recommend something other than a dSLR in this case. However, you may want to start with an explanation as to why you think a dSLR may not be what they need (vs. what they want). If they're still insisting after you explain this, then there's no hope and it's not worth tanking a friendship or ticking off family. Let them shoot ...


5

Kit lens will disappoint them, I think. Prime lens will be problematic for them due to the lack of zoom? (Just my guess) What makes you think that? While it's true that kit lenses on entry-level DSLR's are meant to help minimize the cost of the entire kit, manufacturers also know that it's the first lens that they will use and may be the only lens that ...


3

My (short) answer: Any DSLR with kit zoom that comes within budget will do. Just tell them to use Auto mode. There's no point thinking/worrying too much about it - if they bought a Canon EOS-1D X II, they'd still be disappointed. At least when they realise they're disappointed, they are at least in possession of a camera that allows them to make settings ...


6

As enthusiasts we are all familiar with this type of question. You will likely find friends/family that fit into one or more of these buckets: Want to spend money Want higher quality/performance Want to learn photography The premise is that they all have a vague idea that "professionals" carry around large DSLRs and they remember back in their schooling ...


-1

Get the kit lens. They've almost always got enough zoom to replace a compact / improve on a phone camera. They tend to be lighter the more expensive lenses and DSLR novices tend to find them heavy. The entry level models from Canon or Nikon have the advantage over other brands that there are many more second hand lenses for future upgrades, and more ...


1

Your 18-55mm kit lens and a circular polarizer filter(maybe a grad ND) will get you in the general area of this type of photography. The biggest challenge in my mind will be the right conditions and vantage points to capture the images from and not the gear.


3

you need a wide angle lens, which from what I can tell are all over my budget If the lens you need is outside your budget, consider renting from a place like LensRentals.com instead of buying. You can get the lens you need now for a few weeks. You can get a decent 3rd party wide angle lens (like a Sigma 8mm f/3.5) for a couple weeks for around $100. ...


7

Looking over Jimmy Chin's website gallery for adventure photography, I'd say most were taken with wide or ultrawide lenses, and that's most likely what you're looking for. And as you surmised, those are outside your budget. So, I'd recommend saving up and increasing your budget, if you can, or you'll just have to wait and see if Nikon comes up with an ...


1

I have owned both of those lenses, as well as the "nifty fifty" - which I would assume is the 50 mm lens you already have. The Canon 24-105, even being f4, is a superior lens to the 50mm in almost every way (check out the reviews here: http://www.the-digital-picture.com/Reviews/). The 70-200 is also an excellent lens, but you're kind of comparing apples ...


6

The one that can get the shot you want to take that the 50mm and the 16-35mm can't do. Until you understand what it is that you need your lens to do that your current lenses can't do you don't need a new lens.


0

The question is more about 'appropriate ranges' than brand and model specifics. The ranges look something like this (1st 2 existing, 2nd 2 one or other new) Presumably the 50mm is ~= F/1.8. All others = F/4. .16.35 .......50 ...24............105 ............ 70------------------200 IF quality is similar in the latter 2 lenses then which ...



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