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2

With wildlife, 300mm is considered the minimum focal length you want (if we're really talking wildlife out in the wild, and not backyard semi-tame beasties that aren't shy of humans). 400mm is typically considered a minimum for birds. So, it does in some respects depend on what wildlife you're most typically stalking, in terms of how large and how shy they ...


0

To @Caleb's answer I would add: the accuracy and speed of the focussing mechanism. How quiet the focussing mechanism is. Most lenses are accurate and focus precisely, but they do it at varying speeds. For example, the Nikon 55-300mm AF-S f/4.5-f/5.6 was a nice lens for portraiture and relatively slow moving objects but not animals because: 1) the ...


0

There are a number of guides to selecting lenses on the web -- you should read one or more to familiarize yourself with lens terminology. One you could start with is this one from gizmag.com. Briefly, like many engineering endeavors, designing a lens (and choosing which to buy) is a matter of tradeoffs. You want to build (or buy) the best product possible, ...


2

The general rule of focal length for animals is that too much is never enough. It basically comes down to how much you can afford and are willing to carry. Many nature shots will be in remote places, so lugging the equipment there is a serious consideration. That all said, I'd at least want to go out with a 300 mm lens (relative to a full frame sensor). ...


1

There are several methods you can use to fire the 430EX remotely, and while most require additional equipment, not all of them do. Canon wireless e-TTL (IR) Canon has two built-in wireless systems for remotely firing flashes with its cameras: a radio system and an infrared system. None of your units speak the radio system, but the 430EX can be used as a ...


0

I'm using radiopopper nano transmitter and receiver to fire my 430Exll from 6D.


0

I know this is a bit late to answer your question, but I do so in case someone else happen ask the same thing. I own a Helios 44K-4, but this is because it has got a Pentax K-mount. Here is a link where you can find out more about the Helios 44 lenses in general. Make sure you scroll down and also read the comments following the list of lenses. ...


0

Breaking news: I don't have the link, but I read about the 7D mk ii, that it is so good he wouldn't need a special a version, and gives nicer looking reds than the a but doesn't not-take-it like normal DSLR sensor. Again, not cheap. But I note for others with this question.


0

For portrait photography on a cropped sensor camera, the 35mm f1.8 will give you the standard 50mm field of view. However for landscapes, 50mm is too narrow. In such a case, your standard 18-55 kit lens would serve you well when stopped down around f/11.


0

My canon 60D and 70D have swing-out screens, so I could look down like with the twin-lens. To hold it stable, I'm trying a monopod. That way I can kneel down to look through the eyepiece or use a hood over the screen in sunlight, and still hold it steady at the uniform height.


1

I think the options are pretty straightforward. Stick With 4/3 While the system is pretty much dead and no longer growing, you could, with your budget, still find a used higher-tiered and newer body than the E-510. The E-450, E-520, E-600, E-620, E-30, E-3, and E-5 are all bodies that came out after your E-510 and could offer sensor improvements as well ...


2

Well, you can easily connect a TLR (in the case, a Brownie Starflex with an Olympus T10 digital point and shoot) with a "mending bar" and 1/4"-20 screws at the tripod sockets. Then, you can get interesting waist level photos such as:


0

Quick release plates are great, but if you don't need the quick release ability, they add weight, they add size and they add a potential point of failure. Overall, a good QR plate should be every bit as secure as a screw mount, and potentially even more secure as they can incorporate locking mechanisms that a screw mount lacks, however, the camera still ...


0

Even the best quick releases do not hold so tight to whatever is attached to them as a good old screw (also on the tripods I have/had I never had to turn the camera to fix anything). This might be especially true for non-level angles. So there might be some equipment that you want to attach there, where it makes more sense to have the tight grip of a screw. ...


0

A long 1/4" screw with a nut allows for more thread engagement and a more secure attachment. A plain screw is meant to be tightened with a tool versus just with the fingers as is how many release plates are designed. A plain screw with snugging nut allows for adjustable thread engagement (more threads for a heavier load) and the ease of a snugging nut. ...


1

This article on 4/3 Rumors about the future of 4/3rds is two years old now, but everything said is still true. Although no one has officially turned off the lights and locked the door, the original Four Thirds system is defunct, with both big players (and for that matter, smaller ones like Kodak licensee JK Imaging) supporting the mirrorless camera system ...


0

The 4/3s system itself is as dead as a dodo - Olympus were the last manufacturer supporting the system, and the last 4/3s camera they released was the E-5 in 2010. Does that mean your lenses are completely useless? Not necessarily - the micro 4/3s system is alive and kicking with support from both Olympus and Panasonic (and one camera from JK Imaging, who ...


0

There are a lot of uses for those handy little ball-heads. I use one on my monopod. A lot of time you can see them being used to for lighting support or to hold a cheese plate at a certain angle so it doesn't interfere with your other cables or hold an accessory bar at a certain angle... and some of them are pretty cheap.


1

I think it's simply because then you can attach a quick-release plate which matches the system you're using — you can buy those separately too.


3

Have you considered the new EF-S 10-18mm f/4-5.6 STM ultrawide zoom for crop? Its MSRP is US$299, so it's about half the price of the EF-S 10-22. Sorry, but due to the crop factor, you're not going to find an ultrawide for full frame that also performs as an ultrawide for crop, and definitely not one for $500 or less. To me, this would be a far better ...


2

Nobody can know that better than you. If you feel you need to go wider, get the 14mm lens, but keep in mind two things: It is never wide enough (I have a 12-24mm and I wished I could go down to 10mm. I am sure that if I had a 10mm I would wish I could go to 8mm...) The wider the lens, the more difficult it is to make nice compositions. Personally, I ...


1

Keep in mind that if a tripod is rated to a certain weight, it only means (AFAIK) that you can apply that much load to the tripod without damaging it. It doesn't say much about how stable the tripod will actually be (and I don't even know it there's an objective measurement for that). To make this concrete, I own two tripods, a Vanguard and a MeFoto, that ...


17

Both of your tripod selections look good to me. If you can live within their limitations, they should work fine for you. However, both of them are large and heavy enough that they cannot be called "convenient." They're not the small but highly limited sort of tripod you can tuck into the corner of a camera bag. I find this sort of middle ground ...


0

If you want a zoom, I'd suggest the Sigma 17-50 f/2.8 OS for about 400 euros; there's also a Tamron for about 20% more. The f/2.8 aperture is slow for people pictures in low light, but if the pictures will only be on the web, I'd just use you 30mm and crop- the loss of resolution won't make a difference. For your other needs, the 17-50 f/2.8s would be great. ...


1

the focus accuracy/speed isnt what I am expecting With all due respect, this probably means you're doing something wrong. Even with the kit lens, an SLR will focus much quicker than a compact camera. Similarly for accuracy - unless there's something wrong with either your camera or your lens, then it should focus more accurately enough for most use ...


1

I'm just going to answer the 'is it allowed' question. Yes, and in certain circumstances, they have various restrictions. I know of a couple that restrict the physical length of a lens, regardless of focal length (no kidding). One baseball team that I visit periodically says I can't bring in a lens longer than 8". Check the team's / stadium's website or ...


4

I'm going to disagree with Jasmine here: this is the wrong lens for your camera. The 18-140 is a perfectly good beginner lens - but you haven't bought a beginner's camera, you've bought something designed for more experienced users. By using a lens designed for the lower end of Nikon's range (a "DX" lens like the 18-140), you are literally throwing away ...


2

The sports teams and venues set the rules for photography. Some events don't allow any photography at all. Best to check before you go, otherwise you will have to leave your camera in the car in the parking lot, setting you up for theft. Generally in the USA anyway, professional Baseball allows photography, Football and Basketball do not. As for how that ...


0

Any device that can connect to Facebook will need to first be connected to the internet, so you can't get away from that "connection" step you're complaining about. A smart phone is the best way to post pictures to Facebook. There are cameras which connect directly to the internet and can post to Facebook and other sites, but these are little more than a ...


1

As other users have mentioned, this depends highly upon the height of the plane. Having taken a few photos of a plane flying above recently, I can share with you my results. For this effort, the plane was presumably cruising (I'm in so-called flyover country). If the plane is closer to the ground, you're in a much better position than I was. This was taken ...


0

I'm guessing this would be a lot harder than it looks. I just got a picture of a plane taking off from my local airport by accident in a shot the other day and I'm guessing the plane was only around 5 miles away since that's how far the airport is and it came out looking microscopic! Best bet would be find out ahead of time what airport the plane is taking ...


3

IMO this will be somewhat hard (but not impossible) Planes do not fly at random time: All planes have to register a flight plan with the local authorities and will follow that flight plan; and follow corridors (traffic lanes); so if you have a plane flight number, you can have its position (see below) Elevation/Distance: The higher the plane is the longer ...



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