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by Jakub

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5

There are two types of battery packs that you can get: The first type is your readily available manufacturer packs. These are specific to flashes, as different flash manufacturers use different high voltage power sockets. (To keep you locked into the ecosystem and make you spend more money). The two most common type of plugs are Nikon and Canons three pin ...


5

I've been shooting high school bands for near a decade now. Your question as asked is hard to answer because there are too many variables you have left out. What type of photos are you after? Wide angle shots with a large portion of the band or closeups of individual members? What will your shooting position be? In the stands (how big is the stadium and ...


4

When presented with this situation I've usually hired a VAL (Voice Activated Lightstand.) VAL's are a self-propelling vocally directed support system, they come with built-in collision avoidance systems and fit well into most cars. They are also compatible with most types of light (within certain weight limits) and with the monopod boom suggestion ...


4

The options I'm thinking of must have some characteristics. Portable. Easy assembly. Must be atached to the speedlight (does not matter if the speedlight is on the camera or not) Can be holded by the photographer with one hand. (off-camera light) Decent size, so it provides a decent difussion. Wall/Ceiling independent. :o) I have not tested this but ...


4

We have a couple of existing questions that might help, here. First, take a look at When and how to use a push-on flash diffuser? regarding the plastic. The key is that these aren't really meant to be diffusers themselves, since they are so small. Instead, they provide a bare-bulb effect, and if you are in a room with a low white ceiling and walls, the ...


3

You're pretty much comparing apples and oranges here - the 24-105 and 70-200 cover very different focal length ranges. You need to get a lens which covers the range of focal lengths you're going to need. That obviously transforms the question into "what focal length do I need?" - and the answer to that depends on where you're going to be standing relative ...


2

with a 200mm lens you are going to struggle to see anything much, I would highly recommend you get a teleconverter, as at 200mm even the moon will be tiny. But more importantly, TEST IT BEFORE YOU GO!!!


2

You can estimate this for a particular object you want to photograph. E.g. suppose that you want to take a picture of the Andromeda galaxy such that none of the foreground stars are going to be blown. The brightness of the foreground stars and the viewing conditions determine the longest exposure for a single shot. The seeing condition determines the maximum ...


2

Just my opinion, but first off, trading in an entry-level dSLR for another slightly-higher end entry-level dSLR, to me, isn't really as sizable an upgrade as moving to a prosumer body. While you do get the sensor/processor upgrades of the generations, you don't get the physical UI upgrades that come with moving upwards through the tiers, such as a focus ...


1

Just about any DSLR will suffice by todays standards. For what its worth both Nikon and Cannon make a full set of lenses that will cover everything except for you Microscope and Telescope photography. When it comes to your telescopes adapters are pretty easy to come buy I have one for my D3300 that connects it to a 500mm refracting lens(very similar to this ...


1

You can put the flash on a tall monopod, and then use one hand on the camera, and one hand on the flash, like this guy: https://idigitaldarwin.wordpress.com/2012/05/20/aggressive-gear-pt2/, If you find it too heavy, Use a tripod for the camera and two hands on the flash.


1

That fstoppers Flash disc Rafael posted looks pretty neat. Another alternative might be a flash bender. If you don't mind carrying a bit more kit for a bigger light, you could go with a monopod + umbrella holder + umbrella softbox. Quite a bit smaller and lighter when packed up than a proper light stand and softbox. Though still a lot larger and heavier ...


1

If you're actually going to go to the trouble of bringing off-camera lighting gear/triggers with you, then maybe a small softbox could be useful in some situations, but you do need to understand its limitations and limited usefulness, and I'd say don't go any smaller than 8". I use a cheap knockoff of the Lastolite Ezybox Speed-Lite (22cm). But what might ...


1

I do not really understand when you say "more 'into' photography" because the current objective of photographing a baby could well be achieved by the 35mm lens you have along with the current camera you have i.e. D3100. No need to invest in a new one! I would suggest you to keep the current camera and take a new 50mm (if you have to). "The main reason for ...


1

As Digital Lightcraft points out, the 200 mm focal length will prevent you from imaging objects that requires significant magnification, at least the resolution will be rather poor. If I were going to a dark location, I would focus on deep sky objects, many of these don't require much magnification. In fact, at low magnification, faint objects are more ...


1

The easiest way to get a list of cameras that use AA/AAA batteries is to use the camera feature search tool on dpreview.com, and under the physical features specify cameras that use AA or AAA batteries. The results will be listed in reverse chronological order (i.e., newest models will be at the top). However, the majority of digital cameras do not use ...


1

Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM A Is a lens that I do not own. I thought that it fits your requirements rather well, hence I suggest looking into it. It is wide angle and very fast. How fast are your subjects relative to you? If you are on the same boat, you should be fine. I mention that because sometimes Sigma lenses have trouble with autofocus. You should ...


1

I agree, if you haven't pushed your gear to the max to get the best performance, you don't know what part of your kit to improve. Once you have some skills in photography, learn the work arounds, and know how to maximize your gear. You'll know precisely what piece of kit you need to get. I shoot 4K video, time lapse, and panoramas, on a Lumix LX100 and ...



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