Sunset in Kruger

by MrFrench

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

You can do perspective correction in post. This emulates the effect of tilt-shift lenses. Not all photo manipulation programs have this capability. I often even prefer perspective correction over changing the camera's position, because it allows me to make straight lines parallel while still keeping the angle of the photo that I want. For instance, you ...


7

Many tripods allow you to invert the center column, putting the camera below where the legs meet. You can mount the camera at the proper height this way, then move the tripod around until you get the view you want.


6

Mount your camera on a low tripod and tether your camera to a laptop. You would then preview on the laptop before remotely triggering the shutter and capture the image through software like Aperture or Lightroom. It's more stuff to lug around but you won't need to squat long to compose and capture.


5

Since Canon introduced the EOS system in 1987, all EOS EF mount lenses will work on all EOS EF (full frame, APS-H) or EF-S (APS-C) mount bodies. This means they will be functional in terms of automatic metering and auto focus. What field of view each lens will yield on a digital body depends on the size of that camera's sensor. For a closer look at that ...


3

The Canon 70d has built-in WiFi that you can use to control the camera from a smartphone or tablet, via an app. You can mount the camera on a low tripod (or a taller tripod with an inverted centre column), see what it's pointing at in real time on your phone/tablet and control the shutter from it, too. You'd still have to bend down to position the camera, ...


3

Without the 70D, you cannot print that image that little bit larger. Without the 10-18mm, you cannot get that image at all. Remember: This does not hold true in general. The 70D might as well be the key equipment required to get a certain shot, but that shot will not be a landscape shot.


3

Those are all Canon EF mount lenses. They will work with any current Canon DSLR, but are so old you may desire newer versions with newer technology.


2

To keep the sky from blowing out you don't want any old ND filter, you want a graduated ND filter (GND). This is a filter that only darkens part of the scene, in this case the sky. The darker areas beneath the sky are not darkened so that details are still visible. The advantage of square GND filters is that you can adjust them in the holder to match the ...


2

Usually at the beach, a polarized filter is helpful, to cut down on unwanted reflections. In clear water it aids in being able to see to the bottom was well. Since you are in bright sunlight, the reduced EV from this filter does not impact your shots much. To reduce washed out sky, you can try a graduated ND filter. If you want 'silky water shots' in ...


2

You can improve the perspective by simply standing back and zooming in. The further back you can go the closer to the correct perspective you'll get. You can then correct it further in software if need be. You can also further improve the perspective by positioning the subject off-centre in the frame. You want it below the centre of the frame if you're ...


2

You mention that you use "a regular digital camera", which a few Google searches suggest means point-and-shoot. I hope I will not sound offensive, but maybe a flip screen camera could get the job done? Of course the focus/etc will not be as great as with a DSLR, but if you use a regular digital camera in the first place, then it should be OK. Lower your ...


2

In a day where people are taking unbelievably good photos with their phones and even basic entry level cameras have capabilities and qualities we would have killed for a decade ago and which blow away almost all of the cameras of the film era, it's hard to say that any camera today sucks. Some have better capabilities than others, some have functionality ...


2

Disregarding film and sensor type for a moment, the captured image quality is only as good as the lens the light passes through. So, in this respect, putting expensive glass on a cheap body will allow the camera to give its best. You lens is literally a window on the world, and no processing can recover detail lost by a basic lens on an expensive body. ...


2

So thinking logically about your question, both the Canon T3i and the 70D are both APS-C cameras and 18mp against the 20mp of the 70D means there's nothing in it, 5472 x 3648 70D against 5184 x 3456 T3i(aka 600D) image resolution. Both cameras are equally capable of taking an excellent quality photograph! After all it's the person behind the camera that ...


1

Most folks will advise that you get glass before a new body. Part of this is for simple financial reasons. A good lens tends to hold value better and for longer than a digital body. dSLR bodies, like all digital electronics, tend to depreciate rapidly, even when they're new. And you tend to flip through them at roughly the same rate you'd flip through ...


1

As Mattdm says in the comments, any DSLR will work. If you want to take hight quality pictures of buildings with city lights, you'll end up having to invest quite a lot in post processing skills to get nice high dynamic range (HDR) pictures where the city lights are not overexposed and yet the dark areas are not underexposed. You may not care about that ...


1

This 300mm seems to be lightweight (755g), but definitely not cheap! http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1111442-REG/nikon_2223_af_s_nikkor_300mm_f_4e.html


1

No digital cameras use the Contax/Yashica mount directly (Kyocera never got into the dSLR game, despite owning the mount system), but with adapters, they can be used on a variety of digital SLR and mirrorless bodies, with a few caveats. All mirrorless bodies (Sony E-mount/NEX, Fuji X, Samsung NX, micro four-thirds, etc.) can easily adapt C/Y lenses with ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible