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Hot answers tagged

7

Do I really need a DSLR camera for this? No. The smaller the objects you want to photograph get, the more difficult it is sometimes to use a dSLR, because of the more expensive lens requirements that go along with a bigger sensor to get close enough to frame. In addition, the larger sensors on dSLRs will actually create a thinner DoF when working in ...


5

Google for intervalometer and tethering Not every cameras have an internal intervalometer; most higher-end camera have one (check user manuals). For camera with no internal intervalometer, you can use an external intervalometer gadget, again, check that your camera support it, again, maybe not all camera support that either. Depending on the photo ...


2

I have not examined the numbers to know if compacts do 1:1 or not (I imagine that they cannot), but it seems a moot point. They can indeed magnify very considerably in their macro modes. You typically do have to zoom to widest angle to get the most size from it, and then may be only 1/2 inch in front of the lens. And they can fill the whole frame when ...


2

Well if you buy one from a retail store, you can try it on, take a few sample shots with and without it and see its quality yourself ( it is easier and better to try it before buying and you can see if it suits your tastes )


2

The camera doesn't really matter that much. With product photography it is all about the lighting and the materials you use to project and/or reflect that light onto your products. The more control you have over the lighting, the more you can make the products and background appear the way you wish. For various scenarios and different products the ideal ...


2

A useful additional feature a camera can have for product photography is tethered shooting. That means you can see a preview of the image on an external monitor and also click the shutter release remotely. Sometimes this works by connecting a USB cable, sometimes a wireless connection can be established. This allows to position the camera in arbitrary ...


1

The Pentax Optio 555 (an older digital model you can get pretty cheap secondhand nowadays) has interval shooting features that would satisfy what you're looking for and a DC power input port so you can plug in a socket adapter. There's also a data connection, though you should experiment before the main shoot day about whether or not you can use that at the ...


1

For Canons, I am going to suggest the answer of How to programme EOS utility to take n number of shots? modified for this answer: An Android App Called DSLR Controller (Beta) works really well with my Canon Gear. ... The app lets you program lots of settings like number of pictures, at how many seconds apart, aperture, shutter speed, iso, change ...


1

Going mirrorless enables you to use a purely electronic shutter. Most Fuji and many Panasonic ones have a menu option to select between Electronic, Mechanical or Hybrid shutter. When enabling the electronic only mode, the shutter-speed range often shifts, so check to see if that is suitable for you. For example, Olympus uses a 1/8s limit for the electronic ...


1

When it comes to filters you can get cheap filters. You can get good filters. But you can't get cheap good filters. There are filters available for 67mm threads that claim to be 6 stop (ND64) filters available for $30 or less. They tend to be of poor optical quality, don't really have the density they claim (most of the cheapest ones are more like 4 stops, ...


1

The Nikon F3HP is a professional film camera offering the user complete manual control over its operation as well as an auto-exposure operation. It is larger, heavier and more complicated to use. The Contax T2 is a relatively small, lighter, auto-focus point-and shoot camera with limited user ability to override the automation. I own both. They are among the ...


1

Ken Rockwell is a bit of a canikon fanboy. His reviews are read by many for just entertainment. Some of his articles are useful if you are searching for a canon or Nikon dslr but he also makes up stuff. He makes his living from the site and focuses on generating more traffic. Always read reviews of the same product from different sites like Dpreview,...


1

It depends on your level of expertise in judging what lenses you need. If you are a complete beginner who doesn't know what all those letters and numbers on the lens actually mean in practical shooting terms, and you're getting a entry-level dSLR body, then get the 18-55 kit lens (or if you're shooting four-thirds, 14-42 kit lens :-). Knowing what lens to ...



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