Antarctica

Antarctica
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1

Remove the cartridges and print heads (if possible). Seal them off with clear cellophane tape and put them in a sealed plastic bag (remove as much of the air as possible but don’t vacuum seal as you may pull the ink out of and possibly the cartridges and heads.) Put the bag in a refrigerator (not a freezer). Unplug your printer and then go enjoy your ...


1

Given my printer experiences , with lack of use, I would suggest sell it and buy a new model when you get back


2

You could turn the printer off, make sure that the head is properly parked and the printer is not placed in too warm and dry place. When you come back, run cleaning and unclog it. The wasted ink feels terrible, but weekly printing of one page is not necessarily going to be cheap either, especially if you don't seal the head by properly turning the printing ...


1

I used to put a small amount of paradichlorobenzene crystals into a small bag, such as a desiccant bag and then leave them in the mirror chamber overnight. This damaged nothing and eradicated the mites faultlessly. I took to keeping a mothball in my camera storage cupboard thereafter. I have exactly the same issue now with a second-hand Nikon. However I am ...


2

Ink dries. Small air/ink channels can clog when ink dries. Printer dots (and therefore nozzles) are really small. That's pretty much the reasoning behind having to constantly use an inkjet printer to avoid having the heads clog. You need to keep the ink flowing. You can have someone visit your printer and run a print every week or so. It could be that it ...


5

It sounds like keeping this printer alive is a burden that you don't even want to put on the shoulders of somebody else. Instead, use the situation to your advantage and the person taking care of your printer. print 1 test page per week Why would you want to print a test page? I will travel for half a year I'm sure there's somebody in your family ...


2

When not using my camera backpack, I put each lens, and the camera body in separate pouches. This provides great protection for each piece, but also provides the ability to spread the load around your pack. Camera gear is quite heavy and dense, and keeping a camera body and connected lens on the top of a backpack can cause it to be uncomfortable. Example ...


5

I hike with cameras a lot, most DSLRs are much more robust than most people think, and providing you protect the lens surfaces you normally don't need much to keep it safe. Padding Put the camera away from hard edged items, most hiking gear is soft, there's no point in carrying extra weight for padding, when you'll already have some spare clothes in you ...


1

Yes, it is worth using a hot shoe cover. It protects the electrical contacts and the "side rails" from damage. They can easily get "pinched" by a slight bit of impact. In some fast working environments it is time consuming, yet worth the hassle. *I had to replace my Canon SLR Hot Shoe flash mount after my camera fell over during a long night exposure. A ...


1

I'd recommend using some kind of hotshoe cover (even if it's not OEM) whenever possible. On cameras without a hotshoe cover for extended periods of time, I've had external flashes fail to communicate properly with the camera, dumbly firing at full power every time I release the shutter rather than using only as much power as appropriate, because the hotshoe ...


2

Assuming your body isn't weather-sealed, the hotshoe contacts don't need much protection as the rest of the camera would suffer before the contacts, which are easily cleaned. I sometimes use a hotshoe cover with a built-in spirit level (neither of my cameras has a level display in the viewfinder). It's handy especially on a tripod, but keeps getting ...


10

In some cases, using a hotshoe cover prevents the internal flash from popping up. Many Canon models had (currently have? I don't know) a microswitch in the hotshoe rails, that sensed the presence of a flash. Of course, the hotshoe cover's geometry looks just like the foot of a flash, so the camera thought an external flash was attached, and would not pop up ...


9

I've never used a hot shoe cover. I've shot outdoors with various cameras (Mostly Canon since the early 1990s) for several decades and never had an issue with a hot shoe that could be remotely related to not using a hot shoe cover. In fact, the only hot shoe related issue I can remember ever having was due to one of the contact springs on an outer rail ...


4

The hotshoe cover is to protect the contacts in the hotshoe from any dirt or water exposure or damage that might be caused during use of the camera. I've lost the hotshoe covers for all my cameras the first time I've used the flash, and despite using my camera out in the great outdoors a lot (around a lot of children), I've never felt like they added much ...



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