Spring 2012

Spring 2012
by ani

Submit your Photo
Hall of Fame

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

New answers tagged

4

No! You want opaque lens caps because: Keep light out of the camera when not using it. In film cameras, the sensor is effectively always on. The shutter should in theory block all light, but stuff happens. With digital sensors, light hitting the sensor when not exposing doesn't corrupt the next picture, but you still want light not entering the lens ...


5

Lens caps are opaque to keep light out of the camera. This is something you really want when there's light-sensitive film in it rather than a digital sensor. Most shutters work well, but a tiny leak will result in fogging if light's allowed in over the long term. I'm not sure the fungus angle is valid or not since there are other things that would grow ...


2

it would make sense for front/rear lens caps and body caps to be made transparent. I think the main reason is probably that clear plastics like ABS tend to crack and turn yellow with exposure to UV light, whereas black versions are UV resistant. Experience seems to bear this out: I have some lenses from the early 70's that have original caps, and they're ...


2

Lens caps aren't transparent because it would look terrible.


2

Interestingly enough, optics made for hunting rifles often come with transparent lens caps for both the front and rear lenses. This allows the scope to be used, albeit with less optical precision, without taking the time necessary to flip up or remove the covers if game unexpectedly presents itself. The main reason lens and body caps are still black plastic ...


-1

My brother was bringing a brand new Canon 6d with 24-105 lens i was shocked when the lens never worked in auto, just focused in MANUAL mode. So when my brother went back to the USA, they replaced the lens from the store and got the same new lens(after returning the faulty lens) Today the lens just reached me but I'm again shocked that the same problem is ...


-1

Sorry, not an expert, just my two cents: 1) Warm/burning/overheating: this is a feeling, not something real. If you touch something and it feels warm, it's just well below your body temperature; if it feels like burning but you can keep touching it, it's at about the same temperature of your body. NiMH pessimistic limit is 60 °C, Li-ion limit is 40 °C In ...


0

My practical aproach. Try to get a white camera bag instead of a black one. Or put a white cover, like a raincoat on your bag. Put your bateries (on the plastic casing) inside a methalic mylar bag. This material https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_blanket is used to reflect thermal energy, in spaceships it reflects the sunlight keeping the equipment ...


2

Only Lithium batteries may explode if they are used while overheating. For NiMH, overheating may damage them permanently in a way that will shorten their lifespan, but nothing more. As for NiCd, I think nobody sells this crap anymore because it's really bad for the planet. For precautions of use, hide your gear from the sunlight as much as possible. It's ...


4

NiMH (which is what eneloop are, not NiCd) won't explode in heat you can survive in, but may suffer. The most likely effect is a significant reduction in capacity, most of which will recover on cooling and recharging. Reducing the drain on the flash batteries will help (e.g. by swapping between sets frequently, or only using the flash as much as strictly ...



Top 50 recent answers are included