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0

I am going lapland for 3 days next week and have been advised the camera lens will moist over during during temperatures -3 to -30 and whilst I have protected my lens by fitting a filter. I therefore raise the question how can I overcome this problem I have a Canon EOS 60D camera together with Canon lend. Thanks and regards Paul Todd


0

The manual for my camera (a Pentax K100D) states that you should turn the camera off to prevent possible damage to the autofocus motor: if you bump the shutter-release button while changing the lens, it's possible that the now-exposed autofocus drive shaft will catch on something.


1

I think the main reason is to "park" (hard disk terminology) the components. e.g. VC/IS elements can by their nature move around. When you power the camera off, those elements are "parked". I'm pretty certain I've read in manuals/leaflets (yes it's a unsavoury habit I've picked up, I do read manuals..) that come with lenses. This may also be true with focus ...


4

This is entirely too variable to give a meaningful answer to. Higher quality lenses will last longer under the same usage criteria. But an abused high quality lens won't last as long as a well cared for cheap lens. (Although I suppose some might argue that many cheap lenses effectively come broken from the factory.) Additionally, lenses don't just become ...


6

There is no approximate durability. It depends on many factors. If durability is important to you, beyond proper care I would recommend a Canon L series lens that is weather sealed and likely is made of longer lasting materials. See this for much more information: What makes a camera 'weather sealed'? Also: What is the difference between Canon ...


2

-4C for 4 hours, do not worry at all just do it. No warming no external packs. -4 is not that cold but to be extra careful if any of your gear takes AA batteries use Lithium AAs. Your camera's Lithium battery will be fine. I was out a couple of weekends ago for 6 hours between -10C and -4C and the only thing I tried to keep warm was my fingers. No ...


0

I think the camera itself will enjoy the cold. I recall discussions many years ago concerning using freezing temperatures to get better quality from consumer grade sensors, and the issues to solve involved condensation and batteries. I also recall discussions about winter sports, which is almost the same as your situation. Let the camera be ambient ...


0

If you have a spare car battery, something like this LiPo battery warmer would be perfect (Assuming you can get one large enough for your kit) http://www.hobbyking.co.uk/hobbyking/store/__33990__Turnigy_Programmable_Lipo_Battery_Warmer_Bag_12v_DC_.html


1

chemical heating pouches, rubber-banned to the camera, especially the battery department. The big need is to keep the battery warm so it doesn't lose effectiveness in the cold. Better (and less of a hack) would be to use an external power source like a car battery or some larger power source because you'll likely find that the camera battery will struggle ...



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