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59

Yes. It degrades image quality - adding more elements to a lens always reduces image quality; better filters will just do so less. One specific thing that happens is light reflecting between the front element of the lens and the filter, which can be reduced (but not eliminated) with coatings on the filter. It makes it more difficult to use other filters. ...


34

When I get this question from my students, the underlying question is often based on the persistent myth that taking a lens off without first turning off the camera will 'fry' the lens, the camera, or both (depending on who you talk to). With both Canon and Nikon cameras the leftmost pins on the body (when looking at the camera) are the VBat (6 volt lens ...


30

Film negatives are only light-sensitive while in the camera, until they are removed and processed. The processing includes a step to "fix" the image so that the negatives will not be further exposed by light. So once processed, film negatives (and slides) can be handled in daylight.


27

My advice would be to take your camera everywhere you might potentially take pictures. Take reasonable precautions to avoid shocks. If it gets damaged have it fixed. You could keep the camera in its box for ten years and at the end of that period you'd have a pristine camera that would still be worth nothing. So you might as well use it as much as possible ...


24

I keep a UV filter on most of the time as a secondary barrier - but to be honest, I just have to get into the habit of putting my lens cap in the same pocket each time I remove it. I've spent way too much time hunting around for the the damn things too.


21

A lot of dSLRs are rated to 0 degrees celsius or 32 faranheit, though some more pro ones are rated to lower temperatures. Most of this is about the battery life, it will suffer in the cold. However, in general, condensation is going to be your enemy when moving from cold back into warmth, so the best way to handle that is to put the camera and lens into a ...


19

This doesn't quite eliminate the annoyance, but a leash is a great solution that prevents losing them. Cheap ones just stick on your existing lens cap like mounting tape, and an elastic band goes around the base of the lens. That way, when you take off the cap, it just hangs about 4 inches off the camera, so you can't misplace it.


19

+1 for a filter as a matter of course, but my main walkabout lens, once it's been unleashed for the day, is rarely without its lens hood - the extra plastic quite effectively prevents little bumps directly on the glass.


18

The combination of sand and wind that is common on a beach can be harmful. The sand can get into the camera and damage the lenses and sensors. There are quite a few different approaches: Don't take a camera to the beach I think this is far too extreme, without risk there is no reward Don't take an expensive camera to the beach plausible, but still a ...


18

There is actually quite a few products designed specifically for this purpose, ranging in prices. Most of the products are glorified rain ponchos, and as such, if you have the DIY spirit, you can save yourself major bucks. This is a really good instructional on making one out of rain pants. If you'd rather buy an OTS solution, then consider the ThinkTank ...


18

China is huge. China is so huge that two cities can seem to be two different countries. This means Chinese do travel to other cities as "tourists" too. I am from Hong Kong, so I am a Chinese too. So being in China I think I can offer some good insight. Fact is, Chinese who travel to other cities as tourists are often the more wealthy ones, and enjoy a so ...


17

For all the following: YMMV*, caveat emptor, no responsibility taken for advice given, you decide whether to try this at home. It may even work :-). Be aware that damage may already be fatal and/or that fatal (to the lens) damage may occur along the way. Best attitude is to regard the lens as a writeoff now, with anything you can gain from it by the methods ...


16

Condensation is the biggest risk, and prevention is always better than cure. One thing I do prior to entering such environments is to place a lens cloth over the front element, and heat it with the heat from my hand prior to entry -- the target is to get the front element above the dew point for the area you're going into. With the specific case of the Eden ...


16

Weather Sealing is protection of the internal parts of a camera from external influences such as moisture, dust, and humidity. The degree of this weather sealing varies between manufacturers and also within models by each manufacturer. The protection is provided by both rubber sealing with silicon rings and gaskets as well as design considerations such as ...


15

Cost of the filter is a very real downside. In case of a consumer-grade lens and a good UV filter, you might find yourself spending something around 1/5 of full replacement cost on "insurance" against dust (hardly affects image quality, removable), dropping and scratches (worse, but happen seldom). If you use the lens in good conditions and/or rarely, you ...


15

Most lenses aren't perfectly sealed which means you can get moisture on the internal glass elements as well as the front and this can take a while to clear, leading to mould forming which is very bad. You're unlikely to damage a lens if this happens occaisonally but it's just better to avoid condensation in the first place. Condensation occurs when moving ...


14

The filter doesn't protect against dust getting "into" the lens, it just protects the front element. So the arguments for a filter are equally valid for zooms and primes. Personally I don't use them, as they have a negative impact on image quality. Always keeping you lens hood on is another way to protect the front element. Also, I recently damaged my lens ...


14

*First I'll say that this is mostly preference and you should take all answers into consideration. Regardless, a proper bag should be used. A proper bag has at least 1/4" padding on the outside and separation for all lenses. The outside should have rigid panels to prevent flexing and distribute force from bumps. It should have strong zippers to prevent ...


14

I wouldn't be concerned much about the camera body; there isn't really anything in it that would be very sensitive to vibrations. The only mechanical parts are the shutter and mirror, and both are in a safe postion when the camera is switched off. Lenses are a different matter: individual lens elements can and do become decentered, which can result in ...


13

I customised a tupperware container by adding foam padding to carry a 30D + EF-S 10-22 whilst skiing/cycling. The camera and lens fits really snugly and the whole outfit is very lightweight, waterproof and goes nicely into a small backpack. It's survived several crashes whilst skiing so far, I highly doubt a little vibration will do it any damage (provided ...


13

A DSLR doesn't have a cellular or network connection, so there would be no way to have it report it's position. Some DSLRs include the serial number of the camera body in the EXIF meta data on an image, so if someone posted an image online with that meta data intact, there is a chance it might get indexed by something, but that's a long shot at best. It's ...


12

A diaper bag with a foam insert (like the Domke inserts. It's not pretty, but that's the point: it looks exactly like something you don't want to stick your hand into.


12

The main reason to switch lenses while the camera is off it to avoid exposing the sensor to dust while it is charged as that increases the chances of dust sticking to it. It is really not a big deal but if you want to stack the odds in your favor, you know what to do. There is probably an infinitely small chance that turning the lens will cause a lens read ...


12

I've been changing lenses with the camera on as long as I've been using DSLRs and I know a lot of other photographers who do the same. If there was a significant risk of causing damage the manufacturers would have had it in the neck by now as so many pros do it. I suspect this is another case of there being an astronomically small risk, but the camera ...


12

No, you don't need a special filter for candles or most man madelightsources (in fact using a filter to shoot candles would likely result in a ghost reflection image due to the filter). For shooting the sun a neutral density filter is recommended to cut out most of the sun's light before it enters the lens to prevent damage. A candle is so many times ...


11

Jay Meisel maintains that it is hard to make good images if you don't take your camera along. So which do you optimize for? Longer lasting equipment you don't use or a possibly shortened lifespan of equipment you use regularly? Here is a quote from one of Jay's students: I haven’t left the house once without a camera and realize it’s impossible to be ...


11

The safest position for your SLR is in your bank's safety deposit box. Once you decide you want to take pictures, you must accept some non-zero risk of damage to your camera. Camera in bag with lens facing up: - Harder/slower to remove camera from bag. - If bag hits ground, you must ship the body off to repair the screen Camera in bag with lens facing ...



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