Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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0

It's unlikely you caused damage if it spontaneously fixed itself. However, excessive heat may have caused expansion in the barrel that caused an element to shift, and once you left sunny climes, this expansion would have disappeared. Or it could be that you simply found yourself shooting wide open more often than you usually do. If you find you need ...


0

Unlikely. While it might be possible to damage a plastic lens by gripping it too hard (even that seems unlikely though), if you had damaged it, it would have remained damaged, not mysteriously improved. More likely there was some environmental cause (excessive humidity maybe) that resulted in poor focus (or possibly just user error). It is possible that ...


5

My guesses: Your "new used" lens is not correctly mounted or is defective, therefore producing a bad electric connection, therefore preventing the camera from correctly turning on. Is your battery ok? Can you try turning your camera on with a someone else's battery? Maybe your battery died the same time you switched to the new lens. Does your camera turn ...


0

One possible reason is that the internal parts that allow the lens to auto focus were out of alignment or otherwise not working properly. This could give an inaccurate focus. I encountered this problem with a 18-55 kit lens a few years ago. The front end of the lens would get knocked one way or another while transporting it loose in my backpack. When I ...


2

Sounds like I've had exactly the same problem as you. I suspect your lens is fixed by now but I thought I'd add a comment for your information and anyone else interested :-) We fixed my lens ourselves - nerve, concentration and patience was required! This was not a job for the faint hearted. I've just blogged our experience Fixed: error 99 with Canon EFS ...


0

Sensor damage solely depends on the number of photons that hit an individual pixel on a sensor. Every pixel in a sensor has a well-depth. This is the number of electrons that a pixel can hold. When the well-capacity/depth is exceeded the electrons bleed into other pixels, which causes damage to the sensor. So, any time you are over-exposing the sensor and ...


6

If you're shooting in summer daylight with very long exposure times, regardless of whether you damage your sensor or not, you're going to get a completely blown out image, with no recoverable data. If you want very long exposures in bright light, your only real choice is to cut the amount of light going through the lens. For this, you'd normally use a ...


8

As long as you aren't pointing the camera at the sun, lasers etc. (see this question) You should be ok, at worst you'll get a completely over exposed image and the camera may give an over heating warning or the battery will run flat. This is based on the general consensus (google to the rescue): ...


15

I don't know what specific model rotary wheel Nikon used in that camera, but moving it fast shouldn't cause any excessive wear. These rotary wheels are usually just rather simple mechanical switches. There are usually two separate switches. Each goes thru one complete cycle each detent, but the two are off from each other by 1/4 cycle. The fancy name for ...


8

Those controls are made for rapid adjustment. You shouldn't have a problem with using them as quickly as you can accurately make adjustments. I can't guarantee your knob won't eventually fail, but the speed at which you turn it (within practical limits) shouldn't cause any problems for it. Even relatively cheap dials don't have problems with this and ...



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