Evening

by w.hrybok

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29

I thought I'd offer a completely different, perhaps complementary way to look at this question: There's more risk to more than 99% of the camera users out there of not using their cameras than there is of ever wearing their cameras out. Use your camera! Break it if you have to! But get it out of the case and learn something! Don't get hung up on what ...


23

I would say it really depends on if you have a SLR, DSLR or P&S (Point-and-Shoot) - and maybe even possibly it more (or less) depends if the sensor is CCD or CMOS. My own experiences says it doesn't occur with P&S cameras - ever. I have 4 cheap P&S (Canon PowerShot) cameras which I have used exclusively over the years for shooting time-lapse ...


23

If acids in human's breath are enough to degrade Nikon lenses, I think that's the best argument yet for buying any other brand. I've been involved in photography for 27 years. This is the first I've ever heard of "harmful acids in breath" that could harm a lens. I don't believe I've been living under a rock. I could be wrong, and my lenses could be days ...


22

Taking direct photos of the sun can destroy your camera, not to mention your eyes. It's exactly as you are afraid, the lens will act as a magnifier and multiply the suns intensity right on your cameras internals. What this effects can vary. Long exposures against the sun can cause permanent damage to your camera's sensor, but besides that, your camera's ...


19

The camera's shutter has usually a rating for 50,000 to 300,000 actuations, depending on the camera. For yours, I think it is closer to 50,000 but you should check the manual to be sure. That means you can take that many pictures and still be within the manufacturer's life-expectancy for your camera. When you do time-lapse, you take a lot of pictures, so ...


19

Oh man. Yes lasers can and will damage your camera's sensor! Your laser pointer is probably weak enough, but I still wouldn't risk it. Light painting (as you were doing), is okay, so long as you're not pointing your laser directly into the lens, however, if you plan on doing more light painting, I would switch to an LED or incandescent source instead of a ...


17

I've done a lot of travel with dSLR equipment and cards, I've never had an issue, it's safe to send through. The issue, historically, was with film since x-rays are light and could affect the film.


17

For all the following: YMMV*, caveat emptor, no responsibility taken for advice given, you decide whether to try this at home. It may even work :-). Be aware that damage may already be fatal and/or that fatal (to the lens) damage may occur along the way. Best attitude is to regard the lens as a writeoff now, with anything you can gain from it by the methods ...


17

Carbon fiber can take quite a hell of a beating, both in terms of environment (water, sand, snow) and temperature. I've heard a lot of people discussing or complaining about how carbon fiber is susceptible to extreme cold, however I think most of it is hearsay and speculation. There are only a couple times when I've read something regarding carbon fiber ...


16

In addition to @Itai's answer, I'd like to add, if you don't want to spend 1200$ on a tripod just to protect it from sands, you can use a little care, or on extreme situations, alternative DIY methods. I also wrecked a tripod (not totally wrecked, but the sands kind of jammed the levers on the legs) by using it near a beach on a windy day. The next time I ...


15

I think that depends a bit on the construction of the AF mechanism in the lens. If there is resistance when turning the focus ring, this also means that there is greater force applied to move the mechanics, and so there is greater stress in the material. I would personally switch over to manual focus for that procedure.


15

Yes the trigger voltage on some old flashes is too high for modern electronic cameras. There is a page on botzilla Photo Strobe Trigger Voltages which lists many old flash units. I don't see your dad's flash model there, but the 20 B3 model had a trigger voltage of 168 volts. According to this thread on photo.net, the 7D can handle up to 250V, so that ...


15

I don't know what specific model rotary wheel Nikon used in that camera, but moving it fast shouldn't cause any excessive wear. These rotary wheels are usually just rather simple mechanical switches. There are usually two separate switches. Each goes thru one complete cycle each detent, but the two are off from each other by 1/4 cycle. The fancy name for ...


14

I would say at least for most practical purposes the answer is no. First of all, you only get intense heat where the light comes (at least close to) in focus, which does not happen inside the lens. Second, you only get heat when the light is absorbed -- but a typical lens transmits virtually all the light, which translates to absorbing essentially none of ...


14

I haven't done any analisys, but here is my take on this. There is no doubt that Nikon knows what they are talking about when it comes to lenses and lens care. However, in this case I suspect they are covering their butt. Unfortunately manufacturers are driven to do that more and more because every once in a while someone does something stupid, perhaps ...


13

Lens work surprisingly well with dirty or scratched front element. Here is a very good article about it, someone deliberately ruined a lens to test this effect. Probably you'll see problems with lens flare, but the biggest disadvantage is the resale value, it will be more difficult to sell a scratched lens.


13

Not as much as you'd think: http://www.lensrentals.com/news/2008.10.30/front-element-scratches Depends on the damage, and the aperture. That's the reason I stopped using UV filters; I'd rather get the best IQ possible and risk damage which can be ignored or fixed if required. Damage to your lens might affect the resale value; by the same token, as a ...


13

I wouldn't be concerned much about the camera body; there isn't really anything in it that would be very sensitive to vibrations. The only mechanical parts are the shutter and mirror, and both are in a safe postion when the camera is switched off. Lenses are a different matter: individual lens elements can and do become decentered, which can result in ...


12

I have no proof, but I wouldn't worry about this unless you shoot many many long exposure shots, or in very hot conditions. Sensors are basically just converting light to electrons. In today's digital cameras we are using CMOS sensors, which use very little power, so I would assume that equates to less damage over time as compared to a CCD. I wouldn't be ...


11

I very much doubt you can damage the lens in this way, the glass that the IS system moves is designed to be very light so as to have low inertial stiffness so it can move quickly and accurately. This same trait means it should be able to move against any momentum you put into the lens. Empirically having seen the way some people abuse their super-teles (300 ...


11

I'm going to go with the premise that they do not wear out. I've long downloaded and stitched together videos of solar activity captured by SOHO, or the Solar Heliospheric Observatory satellite. That satellite was launched in 1995, went operational in 1996, and is still sending back images. Its CCDs get POUNDED by solar particles, high energy protons and ...


11

Yes, the Wein Safesync is designed to do exactly that: http://www.weinproducts.com/safesyncs.htm


11

Storing the lens in the refrigerator for a month or even indefinitely at 43° will not harm it in any way. What could potentially damage it is removing it from that environment without taking adequate precautions. Any time you move your camera or lens from a cold environment, such as your refrigerator, to a warmer one you should be sure to place it in a ...


10

As a rule of thumb, don't turn anything that has a motor engaged, it doesn't matter if it's your camera lens or your garage door. Put the lens in manual mode to disengage the motor, then turn the focus ring all you want.


10

This depends on the lens. Focus can be overridden manually for Canon lenses with ring USM designation and Nikon lenses that have MA/M (manual-auto/manual) switch. As already mentioned, if there is any resistance/specific noise when turning the focus ring, you probably shouldn't be doing this.


10

Yes it's both possible and likely that the focus mechanism is broken! If you can't get a sharp image with manual focus one of the lens elements is probably out of alignment. I would normally suggest sending it to a Nikon authorized service centre for repair (Nikon customer service will be able to tell you where the closest one is, call the number in the ...


10

I do it regularly, I don't regard it as difficult. It's not that risky in the grand scheme of things but it's riskier than it used to be, especially with larger full frame sensors. Before the useless "self cleaning" function was implemented, the low pass filter assembly sat right on the sensor. Now there is an air gap to facilitate vibrating the LPF in order ...


10

I would not advise welding in front of lens for longer than necessary, even with shutter closed (you could heat and malform it - while it's not on focusing plane, better safe than sorry). Given that there are photos of welding on Google Image Search that seem to be taken in usual ambient lighting, a short exposure should be okay. Authors claiming to have ...



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