Paris

by Jon

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

18

The combination of sand and wind that is common on a beach can be harmful. The sand can get into the camera and damage the lenses and sensors. There are quite a few different approaches: Don't take a camera to the beach I think this is far too extreme, without risk there is no reward Don't take an expensive camera to the beach plausible, but still a ...


16

The faster the transition, the greater the chance of causing damage to your equipment. If you want to protect your equipment from failure due to water(ie condensation issues) a slow gradual transition of about 20mins is the best idea. With that said, I have some tips below and if you follow them, you should be able to safely speed up this process. The issue ...


16

Condensation is the biggest risk, and prevention is always better than cure. One thing I do prior to entering such environments is to place a lens cloth over the front element, and heat it with the heat from my hand prior to entry -- the target is to get the front element above the dew point for the area you're going into. With the specific case of the Eden ...


15

Most lenses aren't perfectly sealed which means you can get moisture on the internal glass elements as well as the front and this can take a while to clear, leading to mould forming which is very bad. You're unlikely to damage a lens if this happens occaisonally but it's just better to avoid condensation in the first place. Condensation occurs when moving ...


10

Cold and hot are quite different and I can only answer the cold part since I live in Canada and have not been above 40+ with a digital camera. Living in Canada and reviewing digital cameras means that I have taken hundreds of cameras out at temperatures well below freezing. What normally happens is not very nasty but will stop you from taking pictures. ...


10

The best advice I've heard is to put your camera in a sealed plastic bag for several minutes to let it adjust temperature. That way when you take it back out, there isn't condensation on the lens.


9

When attached to the camera and with the front lens cap on the camera will be pretty well protected from dust. Protecting against fungus is a matter of keeping everything dry. Placing everything in a sealed plastic bag is only a good idea if the temperature is kept warmer than when the bag is sealed. Air can hold a certain maximum amount of moisture ...


8

I live in a very humid place. So my equipment has a high risk of getting fungus. What I do is, not keep it inside. Yes, you heard me right :). I use my camera frequently and expose it to sun every now and then (sunlight is a good anti-fungal solution). Apart from that when you are not using your camera for long, make sure you have the silica gel (active) ...


6

Sand is not the only issue, there is also saltwater is the air. Even if you keep your camera dry, the environment at the beach is more corrosive than some distance inland. (Cars owned by those who live near the beach show more corrosion than those not near the beach.) This isn't as big an issue as sand, and is far less an issue the more plastic the camera ...


5

If you see the Canon 600D specification sheet here it says: Operating Environment 0 – 40 °C, 85% or less humidity If the manufacturer guarantees it will operate within those temperatures it will be safe to store it within those temperatures, especially as I believe a lot of operating specifications given by manufacturers are pessimistic, ...


5

Normal humidity (i.e. not something like rain forest) is not much of a problem as long as the gear is the same temerature as the air. It's temperature changes that causes problems. The water stays in the air, unless there is something colder that cools the air around it and makes it deposit the water as condensation. Moving a warm camera into colder air is ...


5

Use Desiccant Packets Desiccant packets are often found in new product shipments to absorb moisture. As I can, I save these packets to reuse in my camera bag when traveling. If you’re not the saving type it is possible to order new desiccant packets online. While its impossible for these packets to absorb all the moisture in a camera bag that ...


5

In a word, static. Digital cameras are electronic devices, and they also have moving parts, both plastic and metal. This is a great combination for build-up of static charge and for sparks to fly. These sparks — even very, very tiny ones — can cause malfunction of the electronics or even permanent damage. If the camera is just stored in low humidity and ...


5

Condensation occurs when warm air meets a cold surface and when that air cools down, its ability to carry moisture reduces, so the water will distill and cling to the nearest surface (the same cold one). As long as you don't detach the lens while the inside of your camera is colder, you should be fine. The little amount of air oozing through between lens ...


5

You didn't link to any specific product but from what I can find by googling "650d silicone case" those products provide no water/dust protection whatsoever. The big opening in the camera that let dust/water in are, in order of importance: The lens mount The battery door Various connectors (USB etc.) Buttons and dials Any case that only covers some of ...


5

Temperature effects camera in a couple of key areas: Chemical reactions. When the temperature drops below a certain level you get a voltage drop from the batteries as the chemical reacts that produce energy are being inhibited by the temperature. This is a temporary effect. Expansion / contraction. Certain parts will expand and contract with heat, lenses ...


4

My guess is that the high end is limited by the electronics. Silicon stops being a semiconductor at around 150°C and of course some margin is needed, so most electronics is rated for less than that. A max operating temperature of 70°C is common, with special variants available (for a premium) that can work up to 120°C. Some military grade ...


4

The car trunk is about as safe from cool as anywhere in the car if the car is sealed. Trunk temperatures may be dangerously high on very hot days. Use of a very well insulated container in the trunk is likely to maintain safe temperatures Ventilation or some form of active cooling would help but are unlikely to be necessary. Active ventilation of the ...


4

My gut feeling tells me there can't be any considerable difference in the cold weather handling of these two cameras. The battery in D3200 is the same EN-EL14 that was already in D3100, released in August 2010. Nikon D3300 uses a new version of this battery, EN-EL14a, which otherwise is the same but has slightly higher capacity. This has been achieved with ...


4

Nikon rates both of these cameras down to 0C (32° F). In fact, both manuals even warn that the battery many be damaged if used outside of the operating range (although I suspect that over 40C/104° F is really more risky). You can probably push it, especially if you take precautions, but do be prepared for (probably temporary) equipment failure. See How is ...


3

The answer will be highly dependent on the specifics of the situation, such as how much heat and humidity, and over what period of time. It's unlikely that anyone will be able to provide an accurate answer for your situation because you very likely haven't recorded the temperature and humidity levels over the storage period, but "incredibly hot" can't be ...


3

From my personal experience I can tell you that cold temperatures below 15 degrees C will only make the batteries run out quicker than normal. I have been in the polar circle with a pro and semi pro camera (D300 and D60) and none of them stopped working; but I had to change batteries quicker than normal. As Matt Grum said before, having the batteries in the ...


3

EE hat on: (1) A "radiation shield" will help heaps - basically if you can keep direct sun off it to max extent sensibly possible. Reflected sun from bonnet (hood) and some re-radiation form other surfaces will happen but (2) handles that. (2) "Forced" air cooling makes a massive difference. A small fan with a very modest airflow directed appropriately ...


3

If the camera is stored, unused for long periods in very low humidity, there is a small chance that some of the lubricants will dry out or move. You want the lubricants to stay where they were placed during manufacture. The most common place that folks may inadvertently store a camera in very low RH is in a normal home heated in winter that does not have a ...


3

Ocean Conditions This may only be a Isolated problem, however I shoot a lot of sea scape shots. The house is of course air conditioned. When the camera and equipment is moved from the house to the area where I am going to shoot I find that condensation will built up in the equipment. This cost me a great deal to repair after a spotting issue developed on ...


3

I have tried this myself. Difference to long-term storage of unexposed film is obvious. Controlled purposeful freezing is far from what happens in a garage or open attic during a year of ever-changing weather. Weather is a problem, not the cold temperature alone. In a normal Canadian winter and spring the temperatures go repeatedly below freezing point and ...


2

Well, a lot of it depends on the camera and lens(es) involved. A lot of point and shoots designed for rugged use are perfectly fine there. For dSLR cameras, it will depend. For most brands (if not all of them), the top end of their gear is often dust and weather sealed and so the camera, itself, is probably well defended. However, if the lens is not dust and ...


2

Technically it can't form inside the sensor (which is just a silicon wafer with etched pathways), but can potentially form inside the sensor package. Of course most people don't make that distinction :)


2

1) Don't point it at the sun directly and you should be fine. They are designed for outdoor use. 2) The camera will be much more vulnerable to dust while using it than when away in any kind of bag, you should adequately protect it from dust and leave that protection in place while in a highly dusty environment. 3) Be ready to send your camera in for ...


2

I live in South America, in Uruguay, where our heat during summer is around 36C up to 42 C (rare but this year we are having a heat wave). I have used my Canon 60D with heat, and left it in my car for a short time, around half an hour, I covered it with some clothing, yeah it sounds stupid, nothing happened to it. What's more dangerous than heat, in our ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible