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0

My guess is that this is a composite of two or more pictures. One was taken at night when the lights were on. This is where the artificial lights in the picture come from. Another exposure was taken when there was more daylight. This is where the light sky and illumination of large flat areas that weren't bathed in artificial light came from. I disagree ...


0

I'd say it's just the light pollution hitting the fog and smoke in the air. Exagerated by the long exposure needed to get the buildings that bright. But you might want to ask the artist himself: http://caudroy.fr/gallery-category/projects/#hong-kong


2

Name Gradient color wash/gradient color overlay/gradient tint Bonus The video appears to be a combination of applying a tint to the video, a little blurring and some time remapping, possibly using a plugin like Twixtor. Filming at 60fps or higher would help facilitate the slow motion/time remapping. Similar speed effects could be accomplished natively in a ...


13

In addition to the factors mentioned by AJ Henderson, I think another important aspect here is previsualization. A highly skilled photographer already has a very good idea of what she/he wants the final picture to look like before actually taking it. In such a case the photographer might then work "backwards" from the desired output (be it via the digital ...


7

While Photoshop is a very powerful tool, it is by no means the only tool involved in producing a high quality photo, nor the most important one. Photography is a crap in/crap out type of art form. You can't achieve a good end result by taking crap in to Photoshop and somehow expecting it to magically allow you to fix what is inherently broken. Photography ...


1

To find out what tone mappings have been applied, both in camera and in post processing when there is no data about that in the exif file, one can consider a few pictures with a shallow depth of field, such as this one. Unfortunately, downloading has been disabled, but nothing stops you from taking a screenshot and using that to analyze the picture. What you ...


3

Complementary to the other answer (by @b-shaw), which focusses on creating this effect in post processing, I'll try to explain how you can achieve this effect "in real life". Your camera captures light (fotons). So you need a light source (in your example at the right side, above the field of view of the camera) and something the light can reflect upon. ...


0

There are a few ways to do this. My favorite way is to use a tool called Rays from Digital Film Tools. I use it sparingly, essentially to reinforce light rays already in the image - http://www.digitalfilmtools.com/rays/ Alternatively, you could create a Rays-like layer by hand in Photoshop and add that over the original image - perhaps at a 50% opacity ...


1

@Garfrey - First, thank you for pointing out this excellent photographer. In regard to her style and secret, I believe Ms. Gadd is able to envision the final image before she shoots it. For example, in her excellently composed photo, 'Lost in Her Reverie', Ms. Gadd places herself exactly between the camera and the waterfall. She selected to wear dark ...


4

This is fill flash + local contrast enhancement (there are many ways to do this, search for single image HDR). The hard part is trying to compete with the ambient light so that your flash is not completely overpowered by it. you will either need multiple flash units to get enough light, or get your flash really close and rely on the inverse square law. You ...


1

To figure this out you start down the path into style and composition, not just making sure a photo a technically competent. Instead of worrying about the geeky bits of photography, you start putting your energy into the artistic and esthetic aspects. A strong voice about this is David duChemin, who publishes through Craft and Vision ...


0

A good way to find "how do you achieve this effect", is to try to reverse the process. Usually, it is not perfectly possible as many operations are destructive, but we can try to have an approximate idea. There is a lot of work on the tones here. We can play with the "levels" tool to obtain an image with flat tones. It is particularly difficult here ...


1

This is most likely not an HDR picture as intended as multiple exposures combined to a single image. But tone mapping could have been used on the raw file, to enhance contrast and detail by using the large dynamic range of the raw. As Elendil mentions, the use of a flash can be spotted by the cast shadow by the biker and the foreground grass and stones: ...


3

Similar look can be achieved by applying an effect called Bleach Bypass. It originated in cine industry, where bleach bath was bypassed or shortened during processing of traditional silver halide cinematographic film. This effect and its variations are still popular in movies. When regular film is processed, the developer bath simultaneously creates black ...


3

you can actually see which instagram filter people use in they photos. Just use a web browser for instagram. That filter is called "Walden" as you can see here: http://square-pics.com/m/858325353241497438_1085312802. There are many other browsers, just google them. Hope it helps :) Edit: By "web browser for instagram" i mean an external website designed ...



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