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24

Increase the contrast - globally and additional local contrast in the trees and other areas (when you say amazing sharpness I think it's a big boost in contrast that you're noticing) Increase saturation Warm the image - you can see the greens have gone yellow Vignette In addtion, looks like they've applied some "glow" to the image. You can do this by ...


20

When light bounces off a relatively nonconductive surface it becomes partially plane polarized, meaning the light tends to have the same polarization direction. Polarizing filters can be used to counteract glare/reflections, by orienting the filter at 90 degrees to the polarized reflection so that it get filtered out. If you orient the filter so that it is ...


15

The effect is due to combining flash and ambient light on a moving subject. The flash illuminates the subject which then moves. The subject blocks the ambient light creating a silhouette, and then moves before the flash fires so that the image lit by the flash is offset with the silhouette, giving the hard cartoon outline effect. No photoshop required for ...


15

So, here's what I got in just a few minutes using two basic tools: Curves, and Unsharp mask: I used Gimp, but this is basic stuff any decent image editing software will have. Here's all I did. First, I used the curves tool to dramatically increase the black point, increasing shadow contrast: Then, I pulled the curve upwards to brighten the (new) ...


15

In Lightroom I increased exposure, contrast, hightlights, whites, clarity, and decreased shadows, and blacks. The biggest impact comes from contrast boost and black decrease. Before/After: Lightroom:


14

Shoot with a small aperture, f22 or like. It is called diffraction. There is a detailed answer Here And here are some sample photos taken with Sony Alpha A35 and an old Carl Zeiss Sonnar 135mm f/3.5 lens. I choose this lens to experiment because it has six blades and has a nice octagonal aperture at f/22. And also being a lens from cold war era, it is much ...


14

Light Trails This style of photography is often referred to as light trails. Photoshop is not necessarily needed. Effects like this can be achieved on a single photograph without multiple exposures. 1. You need darkness for this style. Even though the photo may end up looking light, absolute darkness is needed do this sort of photography. Usually this ...


13

Looking at the shoot I noticed this scene where the photographer is holding a filter at a diagonal angle as if he was trying to catch some light. Does this technique have a name? And what kind of effect can I hope to achieve with it? He is purposefully reflecting light from an off-camera light source onto the lens front element to create "lens ...


13

In addition to the factors mentioned by AJ Henderson, I think another important aspect here is previsualization. A highly skilled photographer already has a very good idea of what she/he wants the final picture to look like before actually taking it. In such a case the photographer might then work "backwards" from the desired output (be it via the digital ...


12

There is one fundamental difference between your shot an the sample shot you linked that no one seems to be addressing: The sample has highly reflective windows on all the buildings, each of which are reflecting each other. There are reflections. Your photo is of an isolated building that either does not appear to have very reflective windows, or is simply ...


11

No. A soft focus image is in focus, but exhibits a high degree of spherical aberration. Edges in the image will be relatively sharp, but will be surrounded by a kind of diffuse softness. This is often particularly visible as an ethereal glow around highlights. That's very different from the indiscriminate blur of missed focus. This is a common property of ...


11

One word, Instagram. It's become a social fad. It does have roots in Polaroid photography which tried to capture casual moments instantly, on low-fi instantly developing film. This look carried forward in to the filters of Instagram due to it being a legit cultural reference to Polaroids. From there, the vintage feel of it took on a life of it's own ...


10

In my career as a VFX supervisor, I've helped supervise several miniature shoots. Shooting miniatures in substitution of a full size scene has been a common technique for almost as long as films have been produced. There are several important steps to make the photograph convincing: Use a small aperture Consider a 1:10 scale model, and put your camera in ...


9

If I understand what your asking, how to get the sun to produce a multi-pointed sunburst or star flare like that (Fraunhofer diffraction), its relatively simple: stop down your aperture to the point where it is no longer circular, but a polygonal. Using a fairly small aperture will produce a star flare around most light sources that are not too small. The ...


9

I took that picture a few years ago so I don't exactly remember. My usual technique when i used to have photoshop was to start off with the auto adjusts, and then messing around with the curves with no goal in mind. I would just try random things and see which combinations I liked best. Also, for this picture I desaturated it a little bit and added a ...


9

This is achieved by what is known as panning. To explain it simply, you basically follow your subject with your camera (in a panning motion.) It takes quite a bit of practice to get it right, but patience and practice will pay off with great looking shots. More information on capturing moving subjects can be found HERE.


8

You could try split toning (There are plenty of examples here) This is a good article about the technique, and includes links to other sites which show describe the best approaches in the main photo-editing applications (Photoshop, Lightroom, Aperture, ...)


8

There are several problems with some of the answers you have already received. First, little of this effect is due to polarized reflections from the car itself. The reflection needs to be at a more glancing angle to get significant polarizing selection. Most of the reflections in this image are steep enough to not make much difference to the polarization ...


8

I'm not seeing this as particularly pastel. What I do see is a very common and popular look we get asked about a lot, often does described as a "old film effect". (See also this and this.) The black point this slightly raised. The deepest blacks are shown as medium/dark gray. A color cast is applied. In this case, yellowish. And that's really all there ...


8

No, it is a combination of light that is in focus and light that is out of focus (or otherwise blurred). An image that is just out of focus doesn't get that dreamy look, it just lacks detail. I had a Canon 1000 camera that had a soft-focus function. It would take a double exposure, one in focus and then one out of focus. A soft focus filter (both optical ...


7

I've found a useful technique is to switch between the original and the edited version. By doing this even minor changes sometimes look drastic, which could work against you sometimes, but it's a perfect representation of just "how far" you've gone with the edits. You can see how true you're staying to the original photograph and how unnatural things start ...


7

In considering the second image I found an example out of my own collection as an example image to illustrate my point. Before adjustments: After adjustments: I think what you are looking at may have been achieved with HDR, as I did with my example images. I used Photomatix Pro with 3 source RAW files to achieve this. Outside of Photomatix, I did not ...



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