Serene Life

by garik

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

40

The reason you can see such a large dynamic range isn't that the eye, as an optical device, can actually capture such a range - the reason is that your brain can combine information from lots and lots of "exposures" from the eyes and create an HDR panorama of the scene in front of you. The eye is pretty poor from an image quality standpoint but it has a ...


34

The Black Card Technique is a workaround for the problem of the limited dynamic range of digital cameras. The dynamic range of a camera describes the difference in light levels it can record. The limits of dynamic range are often seen in landscape photography - you will often see photos where the sky is nicely exposed, but the ground is underexposed, or ...


31

As others have stated the main options are fill flash or multi exposure. I thought I'd post this handy example I shot recently where I tried both techniques: This is the result of using fill flash: The flash was off camera and to the left, near the ground. I was intentionally trying to get a very dramatic lighting effect, had I used the flash on camera ...


26

Exposure fusion is a process that takes multiple images and combines them to create a single image while only keeping the properly exposed elements. In contrast to HDR images, exposure fusion is more basic, gives a more realistic effect, and requires fewer steps. The exposure fusion(fusion, or EF) process takes each individual pixel and assigns a weight to ...


24

Any camera is going to struggle with the dynamic range of that sort of situation. Very hard to get the room and the outside both exposed reasonably at the same time. With enough flash power you can do it by flooding the room with light I suppose. But the easier way is to use a tripod and take two exposures, one for the inside and one for out, and blend ...


22

ND filters Advantages No extra post-processing required. You can see the result in the viewfinder. Disadvantages Making the exposure is more complicated because you have to select a filter and place the transition appropriately for the scene. You probably need several filters (of different density and transition abruptness) to cover a sufficiently ...


20

The answer will most probably change in time. Current top cameras are said to capture around 10-11 stops at base ISO, less at higher ISOs, see DPReview tests of Nikon D3X for example. As a sidenote - you won't probably like the pictures that are processed to measure the maximum dynamic range, they'll simply lack contrast you'd expect from "normal" picture. ...


20

This is a very good question, and the answer could fill hundreds of pages - and, in fact, the answer already DOES fill hundreds of pages. The short answer is that the figures you are citing to not agree with apparent reality because the commonly quoted figures are wrong :-). Read on ... Much is available on the internet on this subject and the quality is, ...


16

HDR Flash fill such that flash deals with inside view and ambient deals with exterior. Juggle to suit. See photo example below. Long exposure with a manually moved mask between light and dark to balance exposures. There is a whole art-form based around doing this. Multiple exposures and manual combining. Can be reasonably easy with tripod due to sharply ...


15

Okay this may be very out of scale, but it's my best guess as a simple demonstration of light intensities. Also, the capabilities of the sensors might be less or more. But you'll get the idea. The reason why dynamic range is so important is because it defines precisely how much of a scene can actually be represented within the bounds of the image's ...


15

It looks like the first one has the right exposure. Not only is the church properly exposed but the tree has not lost details except in the darkest shadows. If you wish for the tree to be brighter then you will be able to adjust things using a post-processing software (look for levels, curves or something similar). Since a camera sensor has a fixed ...


15

In the immortal words of the late National Geographic photo editor Bob Gilka, "Kid, if you want to be a better photographer, you're going to have to stand in front of more interesting stuff." That said, welcome to the sometimes not-so-wonderful world of the commercial/industrial photographer. As often as not, making a dramatic, exciting picture of something ...


13

It makes some measurable difference but does not tell the whole story. DxOMark's portrait score is a technical assessment of the output of various cameras specifically in terms of color depth, which they carefully describe as having a "correlation" with color sensitivity, which is the actual nuance in color. If you look at the results of that metric, you ...


12

How are you metering the photograph? There is no one aperture/shutter-speed/iso combo for any situation, you either need to get an accurate meter reading or 'guess'. When I say 'guess' I mean use the Sunny 16 rule which is: In daylight, the appropriate shutter speed at f16 is 1/ISO So if your ISO is 200 and your aperture is f16 then your shutter speed is ...


12

Well it depends on how big the difference is between the dark and light areas. Every sensor as a certain dynamic range that it can capture - right now most DSLRs are in the 10-14'ish EV range. Your particular camera can capture 11.5 EV in a single exposure. This is the range you can capture in a single go. This doesn't mean this is the dynamic range of ...


12

The size of the sensor does not matter, it is the size of the pixel. Having that said, bigger sensors like in full frame cameras tend to have bigger pixels. You can estimate the size of the pixel by taking the size of the sensor and divide it by the number of pixels. This calculation is not accurate because most sensors have gaps between the pixels and ...


12

Yes, the evidence that this is a fact is that RAW images are used to make the JPEGs. It isn't possible for a JPEG to have a wider range than a RAW image because the RAW image is the actual sensor data from which the JPEG is made. A JPEG is the processed image produced by the camera taking its best guess at how the image should be processed. It discards ...


11

Most digital cameras use a 10 to 14-bit A/D converter, and so their theoretical maximum dynamic range is 10-14 stops. However, this high bit depth only helps minimize image posterization since total dynamic range is usually limited by noise levels. Similar to how a high bit depth image does not necessarily mean that image contains more ...


11

More bits usually doesn't mean more range, but more precision. That is to say, the ends of the scales, the blackest blacks and whitest whites, will stay where they are (at 0 and the max value) but the number of values between them will be greater with more bits. You quickly fall into diminishing returns here as there simply is no need for that much ...


11

The challenge is that you have a scene with very large dynamic range. When you photograph the window from a distance the camera is exposing for the overall scene and you get the curtain somewhat over-exposed and the external scene through the window is fully washed out. As you approach the window the camera is tending to expose for the central light = ...


10

Cambridge in Colour has a very good article on this. If the sensor has a linear A/D converter, the bit depth would cap dynamic range at at 14 EVs as a theoretical limit. However, if it is non-linear, then the bit depth doesn't necessarily correlate. From that, I think we can determine that the sensor in the K-5 doesn't have a linear A/D converter. I can ...


10

The problem is dynamic range is subjective, seeing as the definition of dynamic range (at least in terms of sensors) is the difference between the brightest and darkest details the sensor can record. The brightest value a sensor can record is easily found by looking at what point the sensor photosites become saturated and thus can't record any extra ...


10

The lowest native ISO for your digital camera has the greatest dynamic range. A RAW file keeps all that data. If you shoot JPEG, the data gets transformed according to your image parameters. To get the most dynamic range in JPEG mode you need to find which mode keeps the most dynamic range. This is usually one of the low contrast modes (Natural or Muted or ...


10

The first generally known case of taking two different exposures of the same high dynamic range scene and combining the results was around 1850. Gustave Le Gray did it to render seascapes showing both the sky and the sea. Le Gray used one negative for the sky, and another one with a longer exposure for the sea, and combined the two into one picture in ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible