Incense

by Bart Arondson

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15

Yes and No. That's the only true answer. A lens has to be adapted to your vision and subject. Landscape is a very broad category and I know fine-art landscape photographers who mainly shoot with wide lenses and others mainly with telephoto lenses (ex: 70-200mm). The angle-of-view of ultra-wide lenses really emphasizes the foreground. Moving back with a ...


12

Nikon does this thing where when you mount a DX lens it (automatically if the Auto DX Crop option is enabled) uses a reduced portion of the sensor — the "DX mode" mentioned in the question. This addresses the image-circle issues raised in the other answers here. Both Sony and Nikon offer this sort of compatibility mode, but because of physical limitations, ...


10

Imagine you have an FX camera (or old film camera) with a 50mm lens, and take a picture. Then in post processing, you crop out the edges. You would still have an image with the same perspective of the 50mm lens, but by cropping you've effectively zoomed in on the subject/middle of your image. This is basically what happens with a cropped sensor. Same ...


8

The Nikon AF-S 50mm f1.4 G is not designed for the smaller DX sensor and has the same image circle as the 1.8 Are you thinking of the AF-S 35mm f/1.8 G DX which is designed for a smaller sensor compared to the AF-S 35mm f/1.4G? In any case the size of the image circle is of minor importance to the light gathering ability - only the aperture matters, as ...


5

Be careful here. A lens does not know what camera it is mounted to. Its popular folklore that a lens "acts longer" on crop sensor camera (Nikon DX, Canon EF-S). This is technically incorrect. The proper term is "crop sensor" and what the image looks like is exactly the same as if you took it on a full frame camera and cropped it. Exactly. Take as an ...


5

A 1500 person venue isn't small. At least, it's not small enough to light it with a speedlight, unless you're using it to illuminate a spot using a Flash Extender, or you're triggering it remotely. Talk to the people you will be working with/for. Ask them what they use. They may even have some equipment you can make use of. Find out what kind of ...


5

First off, focal length is focal length is focal length. The "crop factor" is totally unrelated to focal length. It's just been confusing to us newcomers since DSLRs (well..digital cameras in general) hit the market with a myriad of different sensor sizes. You have to realize that the 1.5 crop is just just cropping the middle out of what would otherwise ...


5

On a cropped sensor camera like the D90, I personally find a 35mm focal length more useful, and if I were buying I would go for the 35mm f/1.8 at half the price. Optically, my friends who have the 50mm f/1.4 say it's a bit soft wide open, but has nice bokeh. According to this review it is quite soft wide open, and sharpest at f/5.6. On the other hand, the ...


5

Taken the crop factor into account, a good and also cheap "normal" lens is the Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G


5

The FX lenses work fine, so I wonder if there is any point buying a DX Lens? Yes there are several points. Because the image circle for a DX is smaller there exist DX lenses which doesn't have counterparts in FX lineup. Just two examples: the famous Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM (no Full Frame zoom with f/1.8 exist) the new super-super-zoom Tamron ...


4

The "getting ripped off" part is over now, the money you overpaid is gone anyway. If you keep a lens you don't actually need, you've lost all the money you paid for it. You don't seem to be giving any other arguments for keeping the lens. I think the reasonable steps would be to try contacting the seller to exchange the lens for the one you were actually ...


4

I'm probably waaaaay too late in answering to help you out with your decision (which I'm sure you've made already) but maybe my answer will help others who have a similar question. My own situation is similar. I've recently made some connections in my local music scene which has resulted in me shooting some small venue gigs where I am allowed to get up close ...


4

Things get much easier if you forget about millimetres and focal lengths and talk about angular field of view. If you have a '100mm' DX lens what happens when you: Use it on a DX camera. You get a horizontal field of view of 13.5 degrees (corresponding to 150mm on a full frame sensor) Use it on an FX camera. You get strong vignetting, or ...


4

Really depends on what you are trying to do with it. Portraits, street, landscapes? I use a 50mm 1.8 (1.4 is too soft) on my d200 and it is perfect for portraits and some street level shooting. In my mind 75-85mm is where you want to be for people shots so 50mm on a DX is about right.


4

DX lenses project a smaller image circle than FX lenses, smaller than an FX sensor. DX mode allows you to use an area the size of a DX sensor in the center of your FX sensor so the DX lens image circle will cover this area. Since each photosite in this area is still its full FX size, you will retain all the ISO and dynamic range capabilities of an FX ...


3

You can compare the behaviour of DX and FX lens on various DX and FX bodies graphically with the nikkor lens simulator. You can experiment the field of view, % of crop and more with lens of various focal length on DX and FX bodies.


3

just gains... not comparing to smaller sensors. (1) Higher quality sensors, generally. Because the photosites are not packed as close together on a full frame for a given pixel count, full frame sensors are less noisy (2) Typically the brands top end models are full frame. so you typically get an entire suite of pluses such as build quality, ...


3

Until very recently my shortest lens was a 20mm. While I've always wanted something shorter, I never had the means to buy quality below that and still buy whatever else I needed more urgently. That out of the way, anything can work for landscapes. One of my best (IMO) landscapes was shot using a 500mm tele, another one I really like was shot using a 28mm ...


3

If you really want a lens with normal focal length for Nikon D7100, the Nikon 35mm f1.8G is pretty much the best you can get. However, I feel that the best lens you can get is the one you really want to use. There are considerations like focal length, aperture and things like that, but ultimately, the "best" lens in these categories will not be the best for ...


3

You're using the same sensor pixels, so in many ways, yes you will get the same high ISO performance and dynamic range - but that applies only for a pixel by pixel comparision. If you're looking at a fixed print size, which is generally a much more useful comparision, then you won't get the same performance because you'll have less downscaling going on (see ...


2

I've owned and used both. I sold my 1.8, and wish now that I hadn't because it's not better/worse - just different. Step back, and look at the bigger picture: The IQ on these two are just different (at least below 2.8). Consider the 1.4g because it: 1. doesn't require an in-camera motor to auto-focus. 2. has different coatings/and aperture blade design. ...


2

IF the seller definitely mislead you and did "bait and switch" - and it sounds that way, if you really want to change and it's worth the hassle, you could consider this. It worked for a friend of mine. Create an advertisement which tells the story very clearly. "I bought this lens from xxx but they did bait and switch and ripped me off and xxx ... etc. ... ...


2

Looking at the picture you included here and the pictures I saw on your flickr page, I'd say that you'll really enjoy the ultra-wide lens. What I think you'll find is that you'll have to get closer to your subject but you'll still get more into the frame at the edges. So to get something similar to your example picture above, you'll walk right up to the ...


2

I think you must have noticed something slightly different. The max aperture is a function of the lens and should be unaffected by camera. The Nikon 60mm Micro AF-D will change its maximum aperture as a function of the focus distance. As it focuses closer, the reported max aperture drops. By life size 1:1, its down to f/5. There is apparently a button ...


2

Personally when I do these types of shows I normally stick to my Nikon AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.4D. It was really great low-light performance without having the need to jump to ISO above 1000. The downside typically for venues this size and using a SpeedLight is you can only really illuminate subject within 5 to 10 feet. I make it a rule to not use my SpeedLight ...


2

It's going to be very difficult to get good results if all you have to work with is $600. The 85 f1.8 is probably the best overall lens choice for the situation and budget. But if this is going to become a passion or career you'll need to invest in long and fast lenses. As was said, 1500 person venues are not small -- unless you have access to get up to the ...


2

Generally only Nikon lenses use the AF-S designation. Some other lens manufacturers, like Sigma, will include a designation like HSM to denote that they have a motor (HSM = High Speed Motor). Others, like Tamron, confuse the issue by including 'AF' in their designations, which on a Nikon lens would mean body-driven AF, even though they have a built-in motor. ...


1

300mm is minimal for wildlife. Actually very minimal for smaller ones like reptiles unless they happen to be Komodo dragons (those are really big) or you happen to be in the Galapagos (where you can get really close), in which case you shoot them with a macro lens! The lenses you looked at wont do also because they have very dim apertures at the long end. ...



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