Incense

by Bart Arondson

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19

Unfortunately, very few camera models specify the amount of resistance as anything measurable. Water and dust resistance, as specified by Canon, means very little. If it said waterproof and dustproof that would be a stronger statement. I also feel lawyers got involved somewhere in the writing of these things. For example, some Nikon manuals say 'resistant ...


17

If I understand your question correctly, stopping the aperture down to its narrowest ensures that light is focused as tightly as possible. If you take a photograph at a wider aperture, excess non-incident light will still make it to the sensor, and mitigate the effects of sensor dust. To put that in more precise technical terms...with a narrow aperture, the ...


12

If the dust was really on the sensor proper, you'd be absolutely correct. At least in the normal case, it's virtually impossible for dust to get on the surface of the sensor itself, because there's a couple millimeters or so of filters directly in front of the sensor. The front-most of these is (at least in the usual case) the AA filer. The important thing ...


10

While I wouldn't really worry too much about dust in the lens actually effecting image quality, I would say that is still not normal, and I would probably return a brand new lens if it came with any dust inside. Here is a good example of how bad a lens can get before image quality suffers - Dirty Lens Article As for the dust you see through the viewfinder, ...


10

You asked how effective the sensor dust removal systems are for Nikon and Canon cameras and whether they have improved. To answer the questions I searched the DPReview forums for mentions of sensor dust. The search was conducted first for the entire period of all known postings and then for the last 12 months only. The search of all postings confirmed ...


10

In my experience, it is pretty easy to get dust...as well as other unwanted junk, inside your camera body fairly easily. I follow a pretty rigorous routine when changing my lenses so that I minimize the world-exposure time of anything...sensor, back lens element, etc. Despite my attempts to be careful, even a short, random gust can blow in the most ...


10

C is the correct answer. Well, actually it's A if you look at the sensor from the back, but my guess is that you will turn the camera around and access the sensor from the front. So it's C.


10

Sigma DSLRs have this feature instead of dust-reduction which almost all others have. In the case of these Sigma DSLR, this also block IR light from reaching the sensor while other DSLRs have a filter right in front of it to do that. The suggestion of @rfusca is one I thought of before. It would probably not be complicated to have a protective cover in ...


10

When attached to the camera and with the front lens cap on the camera will be pretty well protected from dust. Protecting against fungus is a matter of keeping everything dry. Placing everything in a sealed plastic bag is only a good idea if the temperature is kept warmer than when the bag is sealed. Air can hold a certain maximum amount of moisture ...


9

I was watching a video about the 645D and the Pentax rep mentioned, in the course of the interview, that when doing dust removal it is best to hold the camera in landscape orientation as level as you can to get the most optimal outcome. He also mentioned that it applied to all dSLR cameras with sensor shake dust removal, not specifically the Pentax ones. ...


9

That looks like a typical dust spot. How blurry the spot is depends on the distance between the filter in front of the sensor and the actual sensor (which is constant for each camera model), and the aperture used. For a smaller aperture (higher f-number) the spot gets sharper. The sensor cleaning function may remove some dust, but I read a test a while ...


9

I live in a very humid place. So my equipment has a high risk of getting fungus. What I do is, not keep it inside. Yes, you heard me right :). I use my camera frequently and expose it to sun every now and then (sunlight is a good anti-fungal solution). Apart from that when you are not using your camera for long, make sure you have the silica gel (active) ...


8

Some have enquired as to the durability of the 7D, and others have even tested it in various weather I was shown how a Nikon D3 can handle mud. The Pentax K5 looks like it could withstand a little punishment. It really depends what you have in mind. How sadistic do you need to be (to your gear and yourself) to get the shot you want.


8

That's definitely fungus, and it's not going to go away. The first question to ask is it affecting your image quality. If it is not then control the problem, always keeping the lens in a dry environment. You could get it professionally cleaned, but honestly for that lens you could buy a replacement for a lot cheaper. You may also want to read about some ...


7

Dust on your sensor happens to many of us, its not the end of the world. If you're not seeing it on photos, I definitely wouldn't take drastic action. Order something like this rocket blower, set your camera to mirror lockup, and gently try to blow the dust off. You can also look at gentle liquid cleaning solutions. If you are unable to remove the dust ...


7

Image quality and possibly expense Introducing yet another element in front of the sensor will degrade quality of the pictures, and for various reasons. a) being outside of protection of the shutter will mean that it is constantly in contact with the air and dust. This will mean it will require more constant cleaning than a sensor would. How often do you ...


6

This article on Pixinfo talks about a test that they have made between for cameras with sensor cleaning systems. According to that, the camera has to be upright for the sensor cleaning to be effective. However, the test also suggests that for some cameras it doesn't matter much, because the sensor cleaning hardly works at all.


6

Shaking the dust does help, but it won't remove all the dust. Some particles will cling to the filter glass in front of sensor hard enough not to be shaken out. Moisture and fat particles will gladly help with the clinging. The sensor still has to be cleaned now and then, but interval is somewhat longer than without shake. Before important shootings, the ...


6

That sure looks like sensor dust, for which I'd recommend seeing the answers in the Best way to clean a DSLR sensor thread. The spot may appear "randomly" because it only appears when you're using a narrow aperture. That said, it seems you don't have a dSLR, thus no interchangeable lenses which are what usually causes the situation where dust can get ...


6

In my experience, its easy to get dust inside the body without switching lenses. Yes, keep it protected. In fact, try not to change the lens in that type of environment at all, if you can. Bring two bodies if you have them available, or retreat to the bathroom or somewhere indoors, away from drafts, if you have the time and inclination.


6

Assuming you're just talking about the front element - I use these disposable Zeiss wipes. They do better than a lens pen (which handles dust ok, but doesn't do smudges nearly as well) and a box of 200 will last a long, long time with hobby level use. My local Walmart sells the box of 200 for under 4 dollars in the camera and the optometrist section. They ...


6

That statement from the Russian site is misleading. Shooting in raw format doesn't have any relevance to spot removal. You can remove dust spots just as easily with any other format of image. There are multiple ways of clearing dust spots: Capture NX uses a healing brush Lightroom 4 (and below) use the spot removal healing brush Photoshop uses a spot ...


6

Other than the obvious advice of avoiding switching lenses when you're in a an old barn or a flour mill or other particularly dusty environment, the main thing is be fast. And the way to do that is to practice. With modern automatic sensor cleaning, dust isn't the plague it was in the earlier days of digital SLRs. So, don't be afraid to just start changing ...


5

You can try this: step down at max (eg. > f/22) take an off-focus blurry picture of some uniform surface (eg. ceiling or monochrome wall). Best is when you can get rid of the subject grain itself, so look for slow exposures and manual out-of-focus! If the sensor is dusty you'll clearly notice spots. If you have scratches, you'll see them also. For your ...


5

Naturally the answer is 'it depends.' What does it depend on? What you plan on doing with your camera. To take @che's example, often times newsguys treat their lenses and camera bodies like crap because they know that the pictures they take are often going to be printed in black and white and at a crap resolution anyway. The dust is never gonna show up or ...


5

Dust on the sensor is a small downer[1]: when you review photos and you see the same ugly-shaped smudge in the same spot in each image (usually in the sky), it sort of makes you wish you weren't shooting digital. Somehow, even without changes lenses for years, my sensor has a big fuzzy dark shape on it. This can be fixed by using a blower or sending the ...


5

Zoom lenses are prone to 'inhale' dust, simply by the act of zooming. Dust is only an issue when it's close to the focal plane of the lens (i.e. the sensor), so the specks you can see on the front element are not going to affect your shots. It's entirely up to you whether you take it back - you don't need a reason to return an item (assuming you're in the ...


5

First, any waterproof camera will do. Those are completely sealed against dust, moisture, water, snow, etc. The constraint on the lens they use means limited flexibility and certainly lower quality than standard cameras of a similar size. Among those, the best one I've seen so far is the Nikon Coolpix AW100 which I reviewed here. Do look at the sample ...


5

The problem with having a glass screen over the lens mount is that it would be useless as the if the rest of the interior cavity is not sealed from dust. The protective screen would then prevent you from cleaning out dust that got in from other sources. Camera bodies are not assembled in a clean room environment, so there is dust around the sensor from day ...


5

Yes completely normal and nothing to worry about. As you are aware all SLR / DSLR cameras have a prism / mirror / eyepiece, which can collect dust just as easily as any other part of your camera. I can only assume that you do not keep your D7100 in a particularly sanitary conditions - as my D70, D300 and D800 have never suffered with viewfinder dust to a ...



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