Incense

by Bart Arondson

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2

The gadget you're looking for is called a video tap or video assist. They're used quite a bit in the film industry to split off an image from a motion picture camera's viewfinder and turn it into video. They used to be available off-the-shelf for SLRs, but the advent of live view has pretty much killed that market. If you or someone you know is into 3D ...


0

For example, the option to do AF-S focusing. That is not possible in live view. Unfortunately as I understand it DSLRs generally use phase detection when not in live view and contrast detection in live view, which seems massively inferior. I wonder if your best bet might be to get a camera that uses an electronic viewfinder more natively that will then ...


1

Nikon D-5300 supports WiFi therefore your best bet may be using a phone or tablet to connect to the camera and shoot using the phone/tablet. Instructions on connecting to WiFi are found here on page 167. In regards to AF-S focus, you may not have the option of using auto focus at all. Canon has the option of adjusting the focus via buttons on the phone ...


1

I'm not sure that there are too many options that can give you a viewfinder-like experience, but with many cameras it is possible to setup in tethered mode giving you a Live View experience on a remote device like a phone or tablet. Many will use this just for the larger screen size available. One solution I like is the CamRanger (http://camranger.com/) ...


3

The inside of the camera will look something like this: Film is loaded on the left, and then you pull at the leader out sufficiently far: The wording in the manual is "to the red mark" which can be seen just inside the right hand part of the camera. Note that the leader is pulled all the way to the right spindle. If it is not this far, the film will ...


2

I'm gonna agree with all the answers before. Technicly it's possible to capture images without a lens but they're gonna be so blurry cause you can't control how to light hits the sensor. My addition to the previous answers here is that you should not even try to take a picture without a lens installed. If you do so, the sensor will be exposed to any kind ...


0

It's due to the dust that has blocked the shutter curtains. Dismantle and cleaning should help the camera recover.


1

Let me throw out my beginner answer: if you don't know why you need the much more expensive thing, you don't need it. A D5300 is a great choice for a beginner.


8

Yes, you do need a lens. But for starting out, a simple, cheap one will do - and there is a healthy market for used lenses. The best choices would be either a 50mm f/1.8 prime lens, often called "nifty fifty" because for technical reasons it is a very simple lens design that can be made very cheaply while still providing great quality. As a prime lens ...


11

Yes, it's possible to capture some kind of images without a lens, but it's not useful. It's like a bike without tires. It's possible to use it to transport yourself some distance, but it's not anything that you would call riding a bike.


6

A body can capture an image without a lens, but it will only most likely be shades of black/grey/white (depending of light source available and shutter speed). No lens = no focal length = no "mm" EDIT: The reason why there are 'body-only' cameras are because camera bodies (and lesnes) get upgraded. So, if you have a lens that you really like, you can use ...


29

You need a lens. It's probably possible to persuade the camera to expose the sensor without a lens on it, but nothing would be in any sort of focus whatsoever. As an aside, if you're asking this kind of basic question about cameras, I'd question whether a full-frame SLR like the D750 is the right choice. You'll end up spending a lot more on your equipment ...


0

The 85mm is a longer lens, so it gets you more reach, a flatter field curvature/less distortion, and probably more background blur than you'd get with a 35mm lens. However, your working distance will need to increase, so for smaller spaces it may not be as good a fit as a 35mm, especially on a crop body, and the longer distance and lack of VR means it'll be ...


1

You have a bit of an odd case as shooting a night club vs shooting a wedding are pretty widely juxtaposed in terms of need. For a night club, you are shooting in a cramped area without much room for clear lines of sight. You are up close and personal with the subjects you are shooting and need a good wide angle lens. The feeling of a club means you don't ...


1

AF 85mm f/1.8D lens is one of my favorite for outdoors shooting. However I'm using Nikon D7000 so it will be 85/1.8G in your case to keep autofocus. I think you will be pretty happy with this lens for the wedding photography. I'd say I'm taking about 50% of my pics with 85mm (I also own Tokina 12-24mm f/4 and Nikon 35mm f/1.8). Nevertheless you spoke about ...


2

Unless the nightclub is empty, I can't see that an 85mm lens will help you - or a 50mm for that matter. On your (crop sensor) camera, even 35mm is marginal for nightclub shooting. I recommend you audition a wider lens, something like a 17-55mm or 12-24mm zoom for flexibility, as these are far more common for this kind of photography. Some suggestions are ...


1

To add TFuto's answer, it also depends on whether the camera/lens uses a digital focus ring, which isn't directly connected to the lens/motor. In that case the ring won't move during AF and you can't hurt anything by rotating it.


2

Focus will obviously change if you rotate the focus ring. There is no exception to that. Now, some lenses allow manual focus override even in Auto-mode, in Nikon world these are indicated with A-M (Auto with Manual override) on the lens. If your lens mechanics do not support this, you are working against the focus motor when you change focus manually in AF ...


5

$10 will get you a flash bracket that gives you a coldshoe or tripod thread to the right or left of your camera body. Even cheeper than that is some scrap steel, and a 1/4"-20 bolt.


1

There are old approaches to triggering two cameras simultaneously. While the Nikon AR-4 has two different threads (it was designed for a macro system where you want the lens disconnected from the body to be triggered at the same time as the shutter) - similar dual threaded cable releases can be found if one looks. Note, however, that this requires a ...


1

As there is no way to synchronize the frame capture times between the two DSLRs, you cannot record in 3D. You would need to make some kind of a synchronization circuit and for that you need to hack into the DSLRs - way too complex for your project I guess. You can create 3D images though this way as single-triggering two cameras using one wire or wireless ...



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