Sunset in Kruger

by MrFrench

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1

No digital cameras use the Contax/Yashica mount directly (Kyocera never got into the dSLR game, despite owning the mount system), but with adapters, they can be used on a variety of digital SLR and mirrorless bodies, with a few caveats. All mirrorless bodies (Sony E-mount/NEX, Fuji X, Samsung NX, micro four-thirds, etc.) can easily adapt C/Y lenses with ...


0

Sony Mirrorless FF cameras (A7 series) are the best for you. You just need a c/y-emount adaptor and you are good to go.


1

As Mattdm says in the comments, any DSLR will work. If you want to take hight quality pictures of buildings with city lights, you'll end up having to invest quite a lot in post processing skills to get nice high dynamic range (HDR) pictures where the city lights are not overexposed and yet the dark areas are not underexposed. You may not care about that ...


0

I think you fell lost in the transition to digital. I'm telling this becouse you are asking about a camera for portrait, fashion, and as you photographed that before you should remember that the main feature there is the lens and ilumination. You used before black and white, negatives or slides. That dosen't matter anymore. The lens and ilumination does. ...


0

I've been in the same situation as you and have solved it using two ways: Remote Live View and Magic Lantern. Unfortunately the Magic Lantern firmware is not available (yet) for the 1200D, so I'll explain the first method only. If something is unclear please ask for clarification in the comments, search Photo.SE or ask a new question. Remote Live View This ...


1

You can increase your f-stop. That way, the depth of field of the photo increases and more of the scene will be in focus. This darkens your image, though. Also, if you'd like some blur in the background, you'll have to keep the f-number low. Additionally you can try to manually focus. That way, the camera won't mess up (you will). As Daniel mentioned, you ...


5

The way I did it back when I had no remote to trigger: Place some dummy object to focus on, start the timer, then run and replace the dummy with yourself. I'm sure you've got something lying around that you can use for that purpose. Even if it's just a broom leaning against a chair. That of course is just a workaround to get things done. If you're doing ...


5

I tried hard to find a source for that information, but no luck. However, it doesn't sound right to me because the idea behind putting a gel on a flash is to alter the light to match the ambient, be it tungsten, fluorescent, etc. That activity is independent of the sensor or the film in and of itself, it's simply about making the light outputs match each ...


2

What you're seeing is consistent with data corruption in that the preview lo-res jpeg is fine, and that the compressed raw has a number of incorrect or missing bytes causing corruption. The question Why do images get "corrupted"? describes the effect at the file level. Use of a different file format (raw rather than jpeg) will give you different output but ...


0

For me this looks like storage card is broken. Replace it and test again P.S. And IMHO you can't fix the photos. You can try software like recuva to recover the files, but it's not sure what result you will get


2

File size is one good reason. My 5DII spits out raw files at around 24MB each and when converted to 16Bit TIFFs they weigh in at around 126MB, uncompressed. With compression they can still hit around 70MB which isn't as memory card friendly as the initial 24MB. Your question mentions .PNG files - the uncompressed 16Bit .PNG equivalent is still 115MB so ...


5

Wouldn't it be useful to have a 24-bit RGB format (taking advantae of the camera's automatic processing modes)? Not really. Raw files are actually very space efficient, since they only store one greyscale channel, in 12 or 14 bit per pixel. A lossless 24bit format will inevitably create larger files, while dropping 4 or 6 bits of dynamic range. A 48bit ...


6

The JPEG format is very good for final output, filesizes are small and with the highest quality settings artifacts are pretty much invisible. It's only if you start editing a JPEG that you will see artifacts and the limited dynamic range. So it's a bad format if you plan to later edit images. If you plan to later edit images than RAW is far better than ...


4

Some do — for example, most or all Pentax models and higher-end Nikons support TIFF (which, as Raheel Khan notes in a comment above, is better for metadata than PNG). So, there you go. If this is important to you, you can choose a camera which has it. However, it seems that it's not important enough to most consumers to make it something people decide on — I ...


1

Dslr have mirrors that needs to be flipped up when taking the photo so they tend to be on the loud side. You've locked yourself out of quite some options by using the term dslr in the question. Outside dslrs, you have: Leaf shutter cameras are very quiet. But the shutter would be inside the lens, not the camera, so the lens is usually not interchangable. ...



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