It's a bird

by Vian Esterhuizen

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0

If you are looking for equipment to shoot short films with, you may want to put maximum priority on auto-focus and smooth focusing. For example, if you need good focus tracking and not jerky focusing, you need a good body and also a good lens, preferably STM lens. If you plan on using wide angles mostly, like within 18-35mm range, then focusing will not ...


0

I also have the 3100 and ave recently had the same problem. If you take off the lens and look at the edge of the screen, you'll see a rectangular wire that holds it in. Just push it free from the clip it's tucked under at the front and the screen will fall right out. Be careful: the focusing screen scratches really easily and then your view will always look ...


4

I was just wondering is it meant to be there or is it manufacturing error? It's definitely intentional -- it's the same in the viewfinder and on the top LCD on my Canon 6D. However, the icon on the Battery Info page on the main screen lacks the open spot. My educated guess is that the hole in the battery icon provides access for the conductors that ...


8

That's how it's meant to look. Refer the manual from Canon's website, page 23: Refer also p36: the top LCD should be the same.


0

As a partial answer, I'd like to point out that it could be short-sighted to only look for the image quality. As a still photographer, I can work with a gripped old DSLR that looks like a brick, is about as heavy and was mistaken for a bag in the past. That's because it hangs of my shoulder and my arms rarely have to carry it. But can you hold that heavy ...


0

There are lots of lens review sites but also lots of factors for regarding lenses as "good". For example for serious video minimal focus breathing, constant aperture (if a zoom) and being parfocal are big plusses, less so for casual shooting. For hand-held video stabilisation is a big plus. For stills there is sharpness but there is also colour fringing ...


0

The main doubt one can have about mirrorless is, I think that they do not provide ttl viewfinder. Is this a big disadvantage? Mirrorless cameras can offer TTL viewfinders, they're just electronic (i.e., using a small video display), rather than optical. But since you're seeing data directly from the sensor, rather than via a different lightpath, ...


1

Interesting thread - however outdated. Nikon released the DF Full Frame DSLR with a refined body that is close to the classic SLR form factor. That was a few years ago already so I suspect we'll see another evolution soon. Unfortunately, if you want something smaller you still have to go mirrorless. Mirrorless camera technology has advanced quickly and ...


0

Yes, you can. The easiest way to do so is to enable back button Auto Focus via the menu options and then select AI Servo as your focus mode. As long as you press the AF-ON button the camera will continue to focus on whatever is behind the selected focus points.


0

Live view and viewfinder use different kinds of auto-focus and are different. Just make sure your auto-focus type is set to continuous and make sure you have the focus point selected and over what you want to focus on. You have to keep the button half-pressed, whereas in live view you don't. It is just the way the camera works. To test hold your hand up and ...


4

You want to contact Sigma and find out if they'll still rechip the lens. Given the age of the lens and the fact that you're not the original owner, they may not be able to rechip it, or might charge for it, but it's worth a shot--the worst they can do is say no. Third party lens makers typically reverse engineer the electronic communication between the ...


-2

Have you got the latest firmware for the camera? If not, try updating it. http://www.canon.dk/support/consumer_products/products/cameras/digital_slr/eos_40d.aspx?type=firmware


4

Because in most shooting modes you want the camera to perform Auto Focus and/or metering between each frame. If you are shooting action or sports and your subject is moving towards or away from you AF for each frame is essential. In conventionally designed DLSRs, the mirror must be down to auto focus and to meter. There are some higher end cameras that ...


6

Mirror moves so that you can track image in real time, framing object better and keeping eye on surroundings. Also, when mirror comes back to normal position, so does AF/AE system. In some DSLRs (maybe SLRs as well) quick shooting with mirror locked-up (and sometime additional restrictions like locked metering) gives higher frame-rate. Example is Canon's ...


-1

If you are using a microSD card with adapter, try changing the adapter. This solution works for me. I've found adapters from Adata and Kingstone to be corrupt.


9

Most dSLRs have the capability to be set to save both the RAW and JPEG versions of an image. The RAW file is (mostly) the raw data dump from the sensor, while the JPEG is a compressed file, where some of the color data was discarded in order to make the file much smaller. If you simply go to the size/quality settings in your camera, and turn off RAW+JPEG, ...


5

You probably took raw and jpeg images. take a look at the file extension, one is probably .nef and the other .jpeg Is there a way to turn this off so I don't have to go through and delete one copy of everything all the time. Yes, you have to check you user manual for that. If you only want either one, you have to decide which one. Nikon has this ...


1

Sherlock, since you have the kit lens and you want a shallow background indoors, there is not much you can do here. I am saying this because, one of the primary parameters for a blurred bg effect is the aperture value. The kit lens gives you max 3.5 and that's just about okay for this effect. So for indoors, try the following: Put your camera on aperture ...


0

The variables You need to play with 3 elements: 1) The max. aperture your lens can give. In your case it is like f4 or f5.6. That dosen't help much. 2) The focal length Use the longest one you can have. In this case 55mm. For your equipment you are stuck on that matter. So the only option you have is to play with: 3) The relative distance from the ...


3

Short distance do not mean long focal length, check macro lenses, Canon have from 50 to 180mm macro lens Cheap DSLR+expensive lens usually provide better result than expensive DSLR+cheap lens


1

I have been where you are when I got my first DSLR. However, I have learned that, there are few things to keep in mind so that your camera is protected and you enjoy photography. I cannot stress this more: Get a good camera bag and ensure that you have silica gel pouches. Moisture is killer. Also, protecting the camera changes with you location, in a beach ...



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