Watching Over

by Vian Esterhuizen

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1

A flashlight is similar to other light sources. A camera measures light, so shining a light will affect exposure. When light entering the lens is very strong, some of it will reflect outwards and bounce back and forth between lens elements. This will cause an artifact called Lens Flare. Again, this is not particular to a flash light but will also happen with ...


2

You could reverse stack two lenses, which can give you an effective lens length of 2000mm (that's the right number of zeros) or more.I recently did this with the only two lenses I have - a 55-250 mounted on the camera, and a 18-55 reverse mounted onto that: The trade of with using this method is that the focusing plane of the finished setup will be ...


1

I don't have any link but I'm an sony A7 user and if you have it try to experiment at the highest speed (1/8000) with and whitout the first electronic curtain shutter. if your picture has bokeh you'll the shape modified by this factor. It may depends on the electronic speed of reading/writing. From 1/1000 to 1/8000 there is a clear effect, the faster the ...


1

Doing a full format will do the trick. Go to disk management on your system and right click on it as well as choose to format. That's the best way to ensure that everything is erased on the card and you may start storing photos from scratch. Good luck!!


2

As @philipkendall says, it may be a camera body issue. If some images are ok, while others are not, it suggests the lens (which is unchanged across pictures) is ok. It may be that either one or both of the white balance and exposure compensation settings might have been knocked. White Balance If this is set incorrectly this may explain why some of the ...


0

Dithering in astrophotography is the slight offsetting of stars in each and every sub frame (sub). Dithering these days is usually achieved by pairing two compatible programs, such as PHD2 (guiding software) and BackyardEOS (image sequencing software), or SGP and either PHD2 or MetaGuide, and instructing the image sequencer to dither. During imaging, between ...


0

Such scenes need either to be bracketed (that is shot varying exposure), or exposed according to spotmeter - measure the brightest part where you want to keep details and add 3 stops to exposure. With landscapes, a graduated neutral density filter is very helpful. Polarizing filter may help sometimes too. And of course set your camera to record raw. You ...


3

This lens uses a screw driven AF, meaning the body drives the AF. The D5xxx series and D3xxx series of cameras need AF-S lenses in order to AF with them.


2

Have you tried doing a full reformat of the memory card? It sounds like it may be taking your camera that long to read files or a file directory that are on the card.


2

Nikon has a compatibility chart where you can look these things up. On this page you can download the chart in Excel format. https://nikoneurope-en.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/19026 It seems autofocus is not supported for this combination.


9

Like the other answerers have noted, it's not at all obvious which picture is taken with a DSLR — both have some pretty obvious issues, like blown highlights and poor contrast. Rather than enumerating the problems, let me offer a few tips for you and your friend on shooting scenes like this: If in doubt, always underexpose. This goes especially for ...


14

I gather from the aspect ratios (top one is 3:2, bottom one is 4:3), that the top image is the dSLR one, and the bottom image is the one from your TZ40. And at web sizes, while there's some improvement in image quality with the dSLR, it's not a huge amount better, and some could be compensated for with post-processing, rather than using ...


4

Both of those images could easily have been taken by a modern smartphone. To get a better image regardless of format what needs to be done is control of the wide dynamic range in this scene. The sky is very bright and blown out in both images. The ground is much darker. Techniques like HDR, Exposure Fusion, and Graduated Neutral Density filters will all help ...


7

To be honest, I couldn't easily guess which is which when viewed at the default 600-pixel-wide size above. Both handle the dynamic range of the clouds pretty poorly, with the lower image being a little less bad. Looking more closely, the top image has significantly more detail in the trees — but still isn't astounding. (Both are subject to very high JPEG ...


1

I'm going out on a limb and saying the DSLR is first. The most obvious difference is the difference in post processing. If your friend was shooting on RAW on the DSLR, it allows for far better adjustment of contrast in post. Additionally, the larger sensor and better quality optics on the DSLR allowed for some additional sharpness for the trees and also ...


1

Check contacts on the card and clean them if needed Try reformatting the card using sdformatter, which makes proper and more thorough format than the camera and often helps with similar issues


1

I agree on the point AmishaKaul brings up about stability. You may have to increase shutter speed or stop down one or two levels to compensate for some increased movement. If your lighting and depth of field can be obtained using a relatively fast shutter speed or smaller aperture then Live View does offer advantages previously pointed out. You also need to ...


4

If you have a reasonable statistical model of the noise sources then yes, you can do better than median filtering, but not by that much. It's much easier to boost performance by simply shooting more images. With regards to exploiting the slight misalignment of images, this can be used to increase resolution, the technique is called super-resolution and ...


1

First, a word about what depth-of-field is and is not: In a way, depth-of-field is an illusion. There is only one plane of focus. Everything in front of or behind the point of focus is out of focus to one degree or another. What we call DoF is the area where things look, to our eyes, like they are in focus. This is based on the ability of the ...


1

You do not have a fixed DoF. The DoF depends, apart from focal length and aperture, also on the subject distance (=what you are changing with the focus ring). So, with eg. a 50mm lens and f/2.8, if you focus at 46.6 meters, your DoF will even extend to infinity (hyperfocal distance)! While at 1 meter, the DoF is only 4cm.


1

Independently of what you shoot, video or still, what lens you use, changing focal point change Depth of Field. You can play for example with this online DoF calculator to see the effect: http://www.dofmaster.com/dofjs.html


2

Right... this question and its answers has been bothering me for a long, long time. It's actually more likely that the first linked shot ("Mallory", back-3/4-lit by a setting sun on the beach) was done in-camera with a D40 (or one of its 6 megapixel Nikon stablemates, the D100, D70 or D50) than with another DSLR. And you don't need anything special, ...


1

A quick search on the internet suggests it is 58mm. It is often referred to as the 'filter diameter'. Also, as a general rule, on the lens somewhere, maybe around the front optic, there is usually a little 'o' with a line through it like this ø followed by a number of mm. That should be the size to look for. Also, if you have a camera shop nearby you can ...


1

The Flickr example you link to is of a single stationary snowflake, standing on two points so that it is crisply illuminated from behind. If you can arrange a snowflake like that all you need is a macro lens, and most phone lenses are capable of decent macro shots like that. The problem with snow is that it usually falls as clumps of snowflakes. Go ...


0

I'd also like to point out that you can use a flatbed scanner. Even one that is not made to handle transparancies can do a fair job with a simple mirror tent placed over the slide. With a backlit scanner is better, as you can put a whole bunch of slides on the glass and make one scan. Use that as a proof to decise which ones to put more effort into (or ...


1

It sounds like low cost is the priority for you at the expense of quality and speed (which is fine, you just need to recognize that's what you're after). Perhaps an adaptor for a smartphone is the best choice: Photojojo has an iPhone/Android film scanner; I've seen similar devices made with a hunk of ABS pipe, too.


1

You can find dedicated slide scannera for sale for less than the price of a lens. Then sell it afterbdoing the project. Which means someone else thought of that first and you can find a gently used scanner on eBay discounted. If you recover most of the cost after the project, you can afford a very good one and end up being outn $200 when you resell it.


1

You can't find a solution at the price you want to pay. That should tell you that your budget is too low to do this project well. The idea of projecting onto a screen and photographing it won't work because those screens are textured and that texture will be added to your taken photo. Sharpness will also be a problem Your goal of 'quick' ignores the ...



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