Lunch atop a (Springfield) skyscraper

Lunch atop a (Springfield) skyscraper
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5

why a lens's aperture only shuts to its specified stop when the shutter release is pressed, instead of staying static at that stop constantly That's because a closed aperture would reduce the amount of light coming to your eye. The viewfinder would be dim. Try the preview button on a lens with a wide open aperture like f1.4 and an aperture setting of ...


11

Why is the Depth of Field Preview button necessary? With the lens wide open, as it normally is before you take the shot, you can't tell how much depth of field you'll get in the photograph. When you press the button, the lens is stopped down to the selected aperture letting you see the shot as it will be recorded, depth of field and all. For both ...


1

One point not mentioned. There should be a dot on the lens and on the body. Make sure they are lined up correctly or you could do some damage.


5

This reply to @Caleb's comment kept growing and growing into an off-topic answer. Maybe you still find it useful. After mounting the zoom ring gear, I'll attach a pinion gear to the stepper motor shaft to control the motion of the zoom ring. A linear zoom throw allows for smooth, consistent zooming that doesn't draw attention to itself. ...


1

I changed lenses on my camera in the middle of a desert storm. And Under "normal" rain. And during a tropical storm. And, she is still ok and ass kicking. Worry not, just try to avoid doing something REALLY stupid (like changing lens with the camera facing the rain...)


2

For years I shot professionally in one of the worst environments for cameras: rodeo arenas. The dust is always in the air, even when you're in an indoor arena, and somedays the wind is blowing, making it worse. Changing lenses in an arena is quite doable, and, with a tiny bit of precaution, can be done without any dust getting into the body or on the sensor. ...


25

This might sound like a stupid question, but… is it actually “safe” to change the lens on the camera? Is this likely to destroy it? Changing lenses is quite safe for your camera, less so for your wallet. Once you see what your camera can do with different lenses, you'll want to start a small collection. Some lenses, like a typical 50mm f/1.8, are very ...


1

I was like you when I bought a brand new Canon 70D. First few weeks I was afraid to touch the camera, let alone freely use it and interchange lenses, but after a while I got used to it and feeling confident using it. It's completely normal that you are afraid to do something wrong to a brand new expensive gadget, I think it happens to everyone, but after ...


3

Yes, it is safe to change a lens. Just use common sense and try to avoid getting dust or dirt inside. Some dust will always find a way to get inside, but most new cameras have automatic dust cleaning sensors. Eventually you will need to manually clean the sensor or have some one else do it for you. The lens mount is quite robust and is not delicate. There ...


47

I'm just terrified that if I make one wrong move, a hair or a piece of dust could fall in there, and then the camera will be irreparably damaged and I'll never be able to use it again. Fear not, young Padawan. Those of us who regularly use dSLRs can attest that simply having dust or hair fall into your dSLR body will NOT irreparably damage anything, and ...


6

Funny question :) but I can see where you're coming from. Yes, it's safe to change the lens! It becomes a very quick process once you've done it a few times. At the same time, don't fret about getting it done in the minimum number of seconds. Some people insist that you should hold the camera with the lens mount facing the ground, but my personal opinion ...


0

It really depends on you. If you are looking for a camera that you don't use often, then it's not a deal. you can take a regular one maybe with a swivel screen and other connectivity options. you will enjoy shooting with the back screen informations. Now, if you are taking this for serious, and you are shooting manual or in settings priority, using ...


1

I'm a big fan of compact mirrorless. You can get Sony NEX cameras near your price range, you just missed a sale on the old NEX-5 that was $250. I highly recommend going with a compact mirrorless or DSLR over a point and shoot, and you are right on the cusp with your budget of getting a used entry level interchangeable camera and lens. I know you don't care ...


1

While your budget of $200 is a challenge, with some research and persistence you can probably find something to meet your needs. Try doing a camera feature search at sites like dpreview.com. You can narrow your search based on all sorts of features, such as RAW-capable, manual mode, etc. Unfortunately, you can't search or sort the results based on price. ...


4

A smartphone is the most obvious solution to me. You don't need a fancy camera(i.e. DSLR) to be a photographer. Explore the smartphone tag on this site for great examples of why many are choosing smartphone photography these days.


2

Generally what and how you shoot and your budget tend to be the three big deciding factors in what gear is appropriate and the best fit for you. Interchangeable lens system cameras, like dSLRs or mirrorless cameras are generally the most versatile types of cameras, because of the ability to switch out lenses and use hotshoe flashes, etc. But they also ...


1

Rectilinear and wider that 12mm on full frame is hard to get, but also hard to use. It's not usual to need more than this exceptionally wide angle in this context. The biggest issue with wider lenses is that they are more likely to suffer from flare ( just trying to avoid the Sun or a bright light source in shot can be impossible ) and are ( as a general ...


4

The widest rectilinear lens available for any full-frame is the Canon EF 11-24mm F/4L USM. To get a wider field-of-view, you need a fisheye or stitch multiple images. Like many extremely wide lenses, a 11-24mm lens does not allow attachments at the front, only filters at the back but those will not help you get a wider angle-of-view.


0

The problem with almost all the camera packs I've looked at is they are either small day packs or larger packs made by companies with little experience of the ergonomics of a heavy pack. I would rather have a really good trekking pack than some sort of hybrid pack that is painful to carry. My current setup is an Osprey Atmos 50L with an fstop medium shallow ...


5

I have used the Xume adapters. Awhile back I standardized on 77mm filters, and also found myself swapping them around all the time. I thought the Xume would be a perfect solution. When I bought them, they did not have a dedicated Xume-compatible lens cap, so I "made my own" with old-school screw-on/off caps and dedicated Xume rings for them. I also put Xume ...


0

I experienced the same problem with my 18-270 lens at the low end of the zoom and with a polarising filter. I tried it with and without hood and changing the aperture and shutter speed. What I found was that vignetting occurs whether the hood is there or not, but occurs at the 18mm zoom with the higher shutter speed. With a lower shutter speed or higher ...


6

Is there a simple way of quickly swapping a circular polariser between lenses (of different filter diameters)? Not really. The simple solution is to have a polarizer for each lens so you don't have to swap them in difficult conditions. The cost-effective solution is to do as you are currently doing and use step down rings. Magnetic filter holders and ...


1

Ok, I see the problem you're talking about - but only just. My first impression is that the diagnosis from Nikon is quite plausible. My second thought is that the reason you don't see the artefact in still is because it possibly only is visible if you drastically underexpose the shot like you did in the video. Try taking a correctly exposed shot of a pale ...


0

Ionization, radiation, transistor wear, color filter aging and so on... In normal use you will never see anything weird except dead pixel count slowly rising that are not mapped out. The worst ones are those that are a little bit lighter/darker than the others. Hard to map them out if they are not exactly stuck. Since I am on the phone this link may be an ...


1

A factor not yet mentioned is changing expectations. When you buy a new camera you get the newest thing on the market: higher resolution sensor, better low light performance, better autofocus system, faster processor, and longer battery life than your previous camera. Over years of use your camera will experience wear and tear that might have a small impact ...


-1

Sensor signal to noise ratio gets worse over time and you will lose a little dynamic range, but you probably will never notice it on pictures.


3

It depends on how the battery grip is made. There are two factors to consider: Can one battery be removed without disconnecting the other? Some grips have a flap type door that opens to reveal both batteries sitting side-by-side and still maintaining a connection. If a grip is this type, can the access door be opened without tripping a shut-down switch? ...


1

Have you considered renting/using a surveyor's transit level? The tripod has a 5/8 inch scree and, if this is critical, you could jury rig something so that the postion of the transit and camera stay in the same relative position on the tripod. e.g. a flat metal bar with a hole for the top of the tripod screw to protrude and be locked on and holes at either ...


0

As this question was originally asked five years ago and still keeps getting asked over and over again by beginner photographers and enthusiast consumers alike, I'll try to bring few fresh points to the table. This answer assumes that you have already decided to purchase a dSLR. But if you are still not sure whether to get into the dSLR world, please do ...



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