Lightnings taking a ride

by ceinmart

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0

You could substitute any model numbers in your question and the answer would be the same. I would advise spending as little money as possible, learning the craft, gaining experience, then reassessing your equipment in a few years. When you have done so you will then have the knowledge to understand the truly small differences between the best DSLRs available ...


0

If money truly is no issue, then buy the higher performing camera. For event photography such as family and friend gatherings and weddings, the ability to get the shot as it happens without the luxury of multiple opportunities to nail the shot is paramount. The most significant difference between the 6D and 5D Mark III are their respective focus systems. ...


0

I found the basic kit zoom very limiting, to the point where I don't use my camera as much as I hoped I would. I probably won't until I budget for additional lenses, which unfortunately probably won't happen until the year after next. My old film SLR rigs would involve a wide prime, a "standard" prime and a reasonably fast telephoto zoom, beginning with the ...


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Will I regret not being able to zoom 10×? The short answer is "depends on yourself", and the longer answer is to ask yourself how many of your existing photos taken at "10x zoom" do you really like? For these, is it a matter of physical barriers (e.g. behind fences) or the background separation (i.e. creating bokeh given the wide depth-of-field on your ...


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It sounds like a limitation of the Canon SDK that it connects to one camera at a time. Multi-camera implementations would either need to disconnect/reconnect to each camera in turn (which would introduce quite a lot of lag) or be written from the ground up to talk directly to the device(s) across USB. Depending on your needs, gPhoto2 may be suitable, it ...


0

You can use digiCamControl to connect multiple cameras and control it in same time, but you can't trigger multiple cameras in same time via USB connection will be a lag between cameras capture around 200-800 ms. If you want do same programmatically you can use the CameraControl.Devices nuget package for it


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I started out in eighth grade with a Brownie, started getting SLRs,graduated to auto focus Minolta 9000(The first auto focus), got a Hassleblad for wedding photography, got the first digital cameras and and have had a Sony DX 100 II for over a year now ( calling it a point-and-shoot it's like calling a Mercedes-Benz a car , And absolutely gorgeous ...


1

First, try something like a Giotto Rocket blower. They shoot a very powerful air stream. Hold the body with the lens mount facing down so anything you knock loose, falls out. I just bought a K screen for my F3 from KEH. BGN grade, because $7 was more to my liking than $17. It had a noticeable spot on the lower (contoured) surface, the one you're not ...


0

You won't really miss the fact that you can't super-zoom once you start using a DSLR. Cameras these days have good enough sensors which can shoot high resolution shots. And cropping them will still produce high quality photos. What I'd recommend is buy a camera that you believe will suit your shooting requirements and stick with the kit lens (18-55mm) for ...


0

I ordered a sensor cleaner from eyelead in Germany. It's a gel pad on a stick, that the dust sticks to. The pad is then cleaned using adhesive paper which is more sticky than the pad. It's a bit tricky to reach into the corners because the pad has rounded corners, but other than that it works great to get dust away from the sensor. As there is no cleaning ...


0

What you need to start is camera, lens , memory card and case. I buy from B&H, almost all body only come with SD card, extra battery and a case. The camera will come with some kind of software to at lease get you started. You need DX lens sense your camera is a crop camera. You won't find a 35mm 1.8 in DX. I would recommend the 18-55 to get you started. ...


1

Will I regret not being able to zoom 10x :( Nobody can tell except yourself. Rent the D5500 with the AF-S DX 18-55mm VR II and try it out. I really like the vary angle LCD thing and the fact its lighter and has wifi built in Just like big optical zoom, these are not exactly the main features of a DSLR. You should consider all features of both ...


1

I would say that focal length is the most important thing to look at. Somewhere around 35mm-equivalent (so, 23mm or so on APS-C). That's the field of view of most phone cameras these days — because this kind of situation is definitely one they need to cover. Similarly, kit lenses tend to be zooms covering this range, for the same basic reason (although see ...


1

The short of it is that the you will want to look for the same attributes regardless of if the lens is for indoor or outdoor use. One could argue that the following short list is of special consideration: Focal length (you may hit walls and distortion is a big concern) Weather sealing (not as important if you never go outside) Weight constraints (not as ...


-1

Definitely purchase a UV filter to protect your lens. It's much easier to replace a damaged filter than to have to replace your lens. A UV filter, as opposed to a plain glass "protector" filter, has the added benefit of filtering out UV light, which will help reduce haze in outdoor shots. And, DON'T buy a cheap filter. Most of the "starter" filter sets are ...


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Of course you should consider them but in the end of the day budget will dictate what you buy and there are no two ways about it. I shoot very similar things to what you are asking about with a DSLR (Nikon D3300) so ill offer some advice from my experience, and some suggestions on why I like a DSLR for these shots. Interchangeable lenses: The dSLR (or ...


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It's entirely up to you, of course, and there's nothing wrong with upgrading as far as your wallet will allow. The question I always ask myself when considering and upgrade is: What do I want to do in my photography that is limited by my current camera and will this new camera address that to my satisfaction? Answering that honestly will keep you from buying ...


1

No, you're not wasting your time considering a dSLR, but you may want to consider looking at older used models, and possibly into mirrorless cameras if you're on that tight of a budget. A bridge camera can do several things a dSLR cannot without specialized lenses, such as supertelephoto and macro shooting, so you do have to weigh just how much you plan on ...


4

This is a bit of an apples and oranges comparison, because the D610 is a full frame camera. isn't it more comfortable to have less focus points wider spread over the whole field instead of like 50 in a small area in the center? There are two different things here: number of af points spread of af points Now here's the thing: the af points of the ...


3

Depends on what you're shooting, but usually, yes, it is much better to have more focus points. There are cameras with just one focusing point (eg. Hasselblad) but usually, especially when you shoot action, you need more points because: focus in center & recompose is prone to error, blur and the delay which the movement of your hand introduces can ...


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My tip would be to buy a external flash with a remote trigger. If you can afford a TTL one, fine, if not a manual one. I also bought 2 sets of rechargeable batteries. This will open you to the world of controlled illumination. Then, if you want, you can evolve into this path. If not, at least you have some basic gear for portraits (as a main light or fill ...


1

Almost any digital camera should last several years. It does not matter if it is a bridge or DSLR, or even a compact. More expensive ones are usually more sturdy but I still have several digital cameras which are 5+ years old and work well. They were replaced becuase something better came along not because one stopped working. Since you mentioned astro ...


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For use with a telescope (or microscope), removable lenses are desirable. For convenience when traveling, "bridge" cameras offer fairly good resolution and choice of focal length without the need to buy and to carry additional lenses. The prices for high-end bridge cameras and low-end DSLR's (or mirrorless removable lens cameras) overlap, so this is really a ...


-2

The article that provoked this thread should not be taken seriously. It smacked of an enthusiast for Mirror-less needing to get the whole world to agree that what is right for him is best for everyone. He was cherry-picking his arguments, and ignoring very obvious counter-arguments The number of people using Full Frame DSLRs might well fall, as many ...


1

Pro photographers do not necessarily always take photos via the optical viewfinders of their DSLRs. Due to the phase detection system of the optical viewfinder, many photographers when shooting subjects that require very quick focusing, will use this method as it is quicker than the contrast detection used when composing with the LCD screen. I do a lot of ...


1

1.) First of all the digital view finder drains a lot of battery. 2.) The SLRs are most efficient when used optical view finder. Its designed that way. e.g. fast autofocus. The SLR works by splitting the light into three parts one for optical view finder, one for autofocus ring and one for lightmeter. For using digital view finder the mirror is raised and ...


-3

That depends how they feel comfortable. I've observed many professional photographers using today's digital dslr camera, preferring digital view finder more comfortable, because it shows you a live result of picture before clicking the shoot button.


0

Will the lens hood increase the photo quality? In general yes, but not always! If the sun is in your field of view, then unfortunately, the lens hood cannot block that. Also, at times, if you happen to have a UV filter on and then a hood on top, this can at times create vignetting. It doesn't happen with all hoods, but can do so with some after market ...


1

Aside from preventing you from banging the front of your lens when you're careless, lens hoods help prevent lens flare in certain lighting situations where a strong light source is out of the frame, but still on axis enough to send light into the lens. Think of looking off into the distance with the sun in your face and you raise your hand to shade your ...



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