Moonlight

by Jakub

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3

Today, most DSLR mirrors are operated by a dedicated motor. Return springs are used to move the mirror back into position. Some DSLR's have two mirror motors. One to raise and one for return. Here is a video that shows how the Canon EOS 7D Mark II operates: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kLU5oygrkpw


0

Get some silica gell, either saving packets or buying a fist-sized bag of it. Use that to help your equipment "recover" after being out in the fog, whether there are any signs or not. (Put the items or the whole kit into an air-tight container (my wife's tupperware or a ziplock bag) with the dessicant.) For a trip to Niagra Falls, I picked up a ...


0

(disclaimer, I shoot with a Pentax k5, I only did a quick google about Canon and Nikon, and nothing for other brands, please feel free to add to this answer) If you camera is not weather proof/resistant (most Pentax as are some high end Canon and Nikon), you will probably need a some sort of rain protect. if your camera is weather resistant/proof then you ...


-1

Except power zooming lens , Zooming in/out manually while clicking the photograph in order to give effect is safe .however below is some tips to improve the result . Here are a few tips to help you improve your results with zoom effect : Zoom-Effect Keep the Camera Still – as you will be using a slow shutter speed any movement of the camera will ...


6

Moving elements around in the lens or changing its size (most lenses get longer or shorter when zoomed) will necessarily move air around. Doing so while the shutter is open may allow dust to get on the sensor. Since getting a little bit of dust on the sensor is the worst thing that can happen if you zoom during an exposure, I would call it perfectly safe.


1

I found this technique as a recommendation to try out with a DSLR in a number of books on photography. To my knowledge it is safe for the lens and the body.


19

Provided your lens isn't a power zoom (fairly rare, these lenses have motors that drive the zoom mechanism), then no you will not damage either camera or lens.


0

The main difference will come when you buy lenses for the 5D, which is a full frame camera, and that is really gonna cost you much more than D3200 lenses. Apart from this there are things like: no built in flash no mass storage device USB mode no GPS and many more features which you may be more accustomed to. So I would suggest not to go for 5D ...


0

The question here is really "Are there third-party lenses which will work on the Nikon D3300?", which is only answered by the other "possible duplicate" question in passing, because it starts from the assumption of incompatible mount, when actually third-party manufacturers do produce Nikon-mount lenses — although Sony and Canon do not. (Sigma is the only ...


2

The short answer is yes, using live view is the equivalent from a mirror movement point of view as using mirror lock-up. (The mirror doesn't drop again). However in the normal live view case the shutter curtain must reset before the exposure can begin. This results in one more mechanical action than just using mirror lock-up and not live view. Additionally ...


1

For landscape photography where the scene is at infinity (or where the depth of field is not an issue, e.g. you don't want the grass in the field to be in focus, only the far away mountain range matters), you should set the aperture to that value for which your particular lens used by your camera, is the sharpest. This can be as large as f/4 but more ...


2

If you need to have as much as possible including infinity sharp, it's better to focus at the hyperfocal distance instead of infinity. Then everything from half the hyperfocal distance to infinity is acceptably sharp. There are websites and smartphone apps to calculate that distance. I'm not sure what you mean by "It is my understanding that with manual ...


-1

there is no best Best is what suits your photo. For landscape that is often low iso, relatively low shutter speed and a slow aperture. But more important the aperture your lens performs best at and fits your picture. the fast and short answer I don't know what your level of knowledge is so I'll do a quick guess here and answer in short that I believe you ...


1

I once (this one, I think) tried to stick a gopro onto the same tripod with my dSLR video, but could not contrive a steady enough mount. In this case I did not want them stacked on the same head, so the gopro doesn't move with the main camera panning. My idea was to use it as fallback when the dSLR loses a few seconds between clips, and to replace vibrating ...


1

In 2011, The New York Times wrote about Doug Mills using such a rig to shoot video with the attached camera while shooting still images with images with main camera. In his interview in December 2013 (at 00:19:49), he shows a Canon 5DmkII mounted on top of a D1x [sic, I guess he meant a Canon 1D x]. Joey Daoud has pushed the idea further to shoot video at ...


1

If you shoot underwater photography at very low angle, you cannot tilt your regular LCD screen due to water protection cover, so you can easily rely on top LCD screen to get to know the ISO, Aperture value etc. Overall, top LCD screen has minimal use and most of the information can be found on regular LCD panel, but if you are used to quickly view top LCD ...


1

They are not the same lens. The older ED II has no VR (Vibration Reduction). The newer 18-55 VR II is so new a lot of the well know and well respected online reviewers haven't tested it yet, so it is hard to compare optical quality between the two. I would be very surprised, though, if the newer lens wasn't more than marginally better than the older one. And ...


0

On DSLR, using a stabilized wide-angle (including myself) is considered useful when shooting handheld in low-light situations. The subject should be rather static, otherwise subject motion blur will still occur during the longer exposure. Another small benefit would be stabilizing the "viewfinder" image on screen (and similarly, recorded video). Intended ...


3

Reset your settings as described in the manual on page 224 menu button -> shooting menu: "yes" for "Reset Shooting Menu" Additionally, check your manual focus settings as found on page 83 of the same manual.


0

Here are different elements that you could consider as pros, cons, and sometimes in the middle, depending on the photography you do, concerning mirrorless cameras. Smaller and lighter: Thanks to the absence of a mirror (used to project the light coming from the lens through the optical viewfinder on DSLRs), the distance between the sensor and the lens is ...


1

You have to distinguish between software and hardware image stabilisation, often referred to OIS - Optical Image Stabilisation - for the hardware kind, where the lens or sensor moves to counteract camera shake and perhaps just IS for the software kind, where software techniques are used to remove the effect of shake. However, Canon's stabilised lenses have ...


0

Did you consider that smartphone cameras are usually much wider (lower apparent focal length) than dslr VR/IS lenses? Wide lense at f<50mm will not benefit from stabilization, because linear distance of image movement is much smaller than with something like f=200mm on FX for same camera tilt caused by of hand tremor. And many smartphone cameras have ...


0

I recently picked up an SLR Zoom with the ball head to use with my Canon T5i for taking macro photos outside. It's not perfect, and it can get pretty finicky for stability if you have the camera too much off level. It's good in a pinch (and infinitely better than hand-holding for macro work), but using either a long timer or a remote becomes critical, and ...



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