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by Jakub

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-1

Check out CameraLends, they are the largest peer-to-peer gear sharing network in the country, so there's likely a local who has what you need to rent. Although it's not guaranteed you'll have what you need nearby, their community of pros are quick to respond and offer more affordable rates and flexibility than traditional and online rental houses. Here are ...


0

If you only switch between P, A, S and M, the drive mode should stay unchanged. Practically everything can be achieved in these modes (hence you may not need the auto modes), it just may need a bit more time for setting up for some scenes.


1

You don't need anything beyond a lens, body, and a memory card/film. If you are looking to buy more things, look beyond equipment and invest in learning the craft. Books, in person training, and 1 on 1 sessions with more experienced photographers are well worth the price.


0

My short but sweet answer? You need a body, battery, and lens. The rest is all up to you, your feet, your creativity and determination. Photography is a fantastic creative outlet. It is about you and how you can convey your view of the world through photography. Cameras and lenses are only a tool. The best advice I received when starting out was to buy the ...


0

As mentioned you will need a memory card and thats about it. It is worth it to make sure that your body only comes with a battery (It should but if its used or a strange deal there is always a chance it may not). For a DSLR all you really need is the body, a lens, a battery and a memory card. Yes that pairing is great. I have the D3300 (a great camera). ...


1

If you consider buying a tripod as many have suggested here, then you should also consider buying a wireless remote control for your camera. The tripod is used to eliminate camera movement to allow for long exposure shots or to allow images to be aligned more accurately for doing image processing involving multiple images (e.g. making HDR pictures or doing ...


3

What you'll need depends on what/how you plan to shoot, so waiting until you've had the camera for a while before thinking about buying more stuff for it is probably worth trying. But the things every digital shooter wants in addition to a body/lens or kit to get started is a relatively short list: a computer of some kind. Because, otherwise, how are you ...


2

What you'll need will depend on what you want to shoot. For portraits, you're gonna need ways to control the light. Just about everything you'll need to get started on lighting can be found on Strobist. Landscapes can be improved with a good tripod. Get one that's good and stable because you don't want it falling down and breaking your camera. You'll also ...


6

You will need a memory card — and to just get started, that's basically it. Sometimes a memory card is included in a camera store bundle, but such bundles are usually a bad deal (see Does it make sense getting any of these "extra" lens packages?). As far as I know, a memory card is never included with an interchangeable lens camera or official ...


4

The single best thing you can get after a body, lens and cards is a nice bag. The best camera in the world is no use to anyone on a shelf at home. Steer clear of any that come free with the camera, they're universally ugly and poorly made. Go to some shops and have a play with what's there. Bags are quite a personal item, but you're looking for something ...


1

Here are some suggestions (with sample price from Amazon; look to B&H Photo, as well). You certainly will need memory card(s), and probably a spare battery or two. You also should get a case or protective bag, if you do not have one. A tripod is useful for close-ups, night photography and studio work. There are many types, from inexpensive ones that ...


2

Unfortunately most (if not all) DSLRs have no onboard memory so your out of luck the shutter clicked but no photo was actually taken or saved anywhere


3

By "internal automatic eyepiece cover" I assume you mean something to block the light instead of something to protect the eyepiece glass from scratches. There are no cameras with an "Automatic Eyepiece Cover" but some Pro level cameras have a manual eyepiece shutter to block off light during long exposures when your eye is not covering the viewfinder. ...


4

Because it would add expense and complexity, and most consumers don't request it.


0

DSLRs don't have electronic shutters. I can't think of any stop-motion artists that were paralyzed by concern over shutter actuations. A camera sitting on a tripod in a studio seems an ideal candidate for longetivity. While you could go mirrorless, I think it would be much more important to have completely manual settings (especially focus). You would have ...


1

You can get some general figures in the 60–80% range by looking up transmission rates of materials like frosted glass. DSLRs often use laser-etched glass that may have higher transmission. But a camera is not like a set of binoculars. A DSLR lens focuses light onto the focusing screen (when the reflex mirror is down), and the viewfinder flips the image ...


-1

If you know how to quickly meter and light an unfolding scene, then you can shoot using a set, low iso, just like in the good old days of film, which were about 16 years ago. If you came of age with digital and auto settings, then you will probably always rely on automatic tricks like constantly changing auto iso. I like more control than that in all ...


0

From the sound of it you should honestly just invest in a nice point and shoot. If you buy a DSLR for the trip you're going to want a zoom that's 200mm or so which can get pricey. And unless you know what you're doing with the camera and can quickly adjust ISO, Shutter, f. stop, etc... you're going to be shooting it in auto mode anyway which would ...


1

For me, when you go on a safari is really not the time to a) learn a brand new type of camera, b) learn all about wildlife photography technique and field craft, and c) gain supertelephoto photography skillz. That's a lot of knowledge to gain that most of us get only from years of experience. Wildlife photography, like sports photography, is one of the ...


1

This screen also known as a "ground glass screen" (though it's not always made of glass) has a very fine etched pattern on one side of it to facilitate the way it scatters light. Cleaning the side of it with this surface is not practical as it's likely to both deposit small particles into this etched surface and possibly damage the etched surface (think ...


0

If you are looking for equipment to shoot short films with, you may want to put maximum priority on auto-focus and smooth focusing. For example, if you need good focus tracking and not jerky focusing, you need a good body and also a good lens, preferably STM lens. If you plan on using wide angles mostly, like within 18-35mm range, then focusing will not ...


0

I also have the 3100 and have recently had the same problem. If you take off the lens and look at the edge of the screen, you'll see a rectangular wire that holds it in. Just push it free from the clip it's tucked under at the front and the screen will fall right out. Be careful: the focusing screen scratches really easily and then your view will always look ...



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