Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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0

One possible reason that has nothing to do with autofocus is that the image sensor must be cleared of all charge before an image is taken. Using the main image sensor for AF/composition, as is done with all liveview cameras (most of mirrorless), does require that the sensor be turned off and cleared of charge before the image is taken, otherwise you'd have ...


3

You are comparing two lenses in different price ranges. Some of the price difference naturally comes from the focus motor, but most of it comes from the more expensive one having: Vibration Reduction (VR) More advanced optics (17 lens elements compared to 13) Extra-low Dispersion glass (ED) Internal Focusing (IF) There are certainly cheaper lenses with ...


4

The problem with putting something between the lens and the camera is that you've moved the lens farther away from the sensor than it was designed to be. If your attachment doesn't have any optics in it, you've basically added an extension tube, and the lens will only be able to focus at close distances (possibly very close distances, like macro ...


8

This not a thing that can happen. Cameras just don't work that way. For that matter, light doesn't work that way. Specifically, for digital cameras: every "photosite" — each individual pixel-level sensor — is just a counter of photons. It doesn't have any sense of the wavelength of the light received, and correspondingly no perception of color. In order to ...


1

Take a Computational Photography or "Computer Vision" course, or read a book, and see in which of its subfields you can contribute to the greater good, earn money and have fun. There are also cameras forming parts of other systems, e.g. on microscopes, on assembly lines , on satellites; and software for these devices needs to be written, but this is not ...


4

Learn (if you don't know already) C/C++ - it is THE language for embedded systems (no, I don't like it, but this is the way it is) Learn how a (dSLR) camera works as a machine. Of course, you need to buy one - highly recommended a Canon (recommended 5D Mk2 or, better, 5D Mk3) because of the latest point in my list. Learn to be a photographer - learn his/her ...


3

First ask the lecturer/course co-ordinator! After that, assuming your course suggests/requires a DSLR: I'd recommmend that you physically handle the various options and find something that feels good to you (comfortable etc.) Don't spend too much money on a camera body and neglect the lenses, rather spend more on good lenses than the body. You may ...


-5

Buy the most expensive Canon DSLR you can afford. Although Canon's are not suitable for professional use, they do have two distinct advantages over other brands for newcomers: They are simple to use (and there is vast troubleshooting literature on the internet) and They are are relatively inexpensive and tend to provide a good "bang for your buck". On ...


1

You have to make a distinction between mixing lights and mixing ink. When you take a picture, whatever camera you have (Digital, Analog, iPad, iPhone...) you are capturing lights. And according to physics laws, in the lights, the white is the mix of all other colors. The rainbow is a good example of lights diffraction. It's simply a separation of the white ...


8

It sounds like you are describing mirrorless system cameras. They have the interchangeable lenses and some of them have larger sensors, but they always use the sensor directly to an LCD or OLED display rather than using a viewfinder (or in rare case, use a viewfinder that doesn't go through the lens), which saves on size and weight (while giving up a few ...


2

Cameras are RGB because of the color filters over each of the pixels (photosites) on the sensor. There are a couple of rare cameras with a filter that instead samples cyan, magenta and yellow (not sure about luminance (black)), however this then would require a conversion to RGB to work with most screens and even a lot of photo printers which are RGB based. ...


11

Inherently, no. The RGB model is natural for recording light, and the CMYK model is natural for printing (where reflected light is subtracted). But see Are RGB numeric values equal to CMYK percentages? — the loss in conversation isn't inherently because RGB to CMYK is inherently lossy, but because the actual color spaces of the devices used are different, ...


4

So, the vast majority of sensors are RGB (the array is usually 1 red, 1 blue, and 2 greens or Foveon), so right off the bat you're working with handicap with respect to CMYK. However, that's not really the reason why this doesn't work... CMYK is a subtractive color model, it works by subtracting from white which is the presence of all colors. RGB is ...


2

Considering the price factor, a cheap entry level DSLR with its kit lens alone is not producing much better quality than a point&shoot from the same price group is. The Sony QX10 is among the Point&shoots here. Only with a more compact size than is usual. Difference in depth of field is one major difference. It means that a focusing mistake will be ...


7

The QX10 and QX100 aren't actually lenses for your phone, they are a miniature point and shoot camera that uses your phone for control and display of the images. (Think of it kind of like a remote controlled digital camera with no screen.) It has its own sensor and is basically the same as buying a point and shoot that copies the photos to your phone. ...


3

The main benefit of a mobile phone is that it fits in your pants pocket so you can take pictures anywhere you go without too much discomfort. With the QX10, it increases the bulk of your mobile phone to be comparable to a point-and-shoot camera, so why not get an actual point-and-shoot for a lot less? (In both cases, it will be difficult to fit in a pants ...



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