Napioa - Wind Origins

Napioa - Wind Origins
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3

Whether this is where you found it or not, the definition you give for "Unity Gain ISO" comes from the Clarkvision web site's section on digital sensor performance. As an updated version of that page explains, it's a silly concept. To quote: The fundamental reason Unity Gain is not relevant is because the sensor in a digital camera is an analog system, ...


1

Unity gain is such ISO number at which camera outputs pixel values roughly equal to numbers of electrons in cells. Native ISO is such ISO value at which the maximum number of electrons in cell is matched to saturation point. It is almost always division instead of multiplication for sensors with big enough electron capacity per cell. Native ISO is as unique ...


2

Both approaches are correct. At least as I understand what I think you are trying to say. I'm not sure, though, what you mean by, "(4 time bigger)". Raw luminance values are monochromatic in the sense that there is only one intensity value for each sensel (what we call a pixel well). But every one of those monochromatic luminance values is the result of ...


0

Yes, it is possible to program a specific number of shots with EOS Utility. It is also possible to define the interval between shots and the shutter speed and aperture value for each shot. You can also set it to do exposure bracketing as well. For more about the capabilities of EOS Utility, please see Getting the Most From EOS Utility. Here's a direct link ...


0

Here's how with a different Camera, explains things to consider: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svY2NOEBEQA .


1

This thread appeared when I searched whether sensors lose their sensitivity . . so FWIW my lovely 10 year old high-end compact camera (CCD sensor) still shoots correctly exposed pictures but then quotes abnormal f stop/shutter speed combinations for the fixed ISO in the EXIF info. I've checked back on my earlier pictures and then the quoted exposure ...


0

There is a noticeable difference if you are shooting in a wide light range. An example would be a bright sunny day with high contrast. I have a sony a7r. The native iso is 100 but I can shoot the iso at 50. I started shooting most photos at 50 to have as little grain in my images as possible and have that crystal clear image. On most photos I didn't ...


0

Being able to do this over USB is unlikely but not impossible. My Nikon D750 has 7-9V 2.5A stamped on the bottom of it. That's a draw between 18W and 22W. This is significant because you can buy USB step-up converters to get to 9V. The problem is most of these (one example) are limited in terms of current output to around ~5W... And 7W before they start ...


0

I put together a homemade solution using an 8V 1A power supply and a capacitor in the old battery housings. I'd recommend this approach if you're confident in your electronics ability, in particular in your ability to do it all patiently and carefully. You could easily fry the camera if you get it wrong. Access to a bench supply, combined with a camera ...


22

Is there really no way automate a DSLR to shoot every 24 hours without having to pick it up, charge/replace its battery, and put in back on the same spot ? Canon and Nikon cameras can be connected to AC power by means of an adapter that fits in the battery slot. For example, Canon DSLRs that take an LB-E6 battery (like the 5D II, 6D, and 7D) can use an ...


5

No, cameras can not be powered by a USB port because they typically require more than The 5 volts maximun available from the USB port.


1

Many DSLRs have external power jack (it is often cylindrical, like those which are used in laptops). Some others might use an AC adapter which fits into the battery compartment. Most DSLRs cannot be powered through their USB port (in fact, I have not seen any that can).


2

Short Answer: No, I do not believe you can force the camera's spot metering point (which is the focusing array's central focus point, proved below) to become visible while spot metering and using the auto-area AF mode. To find out more about how I came to this conclusion, continue reading. Long Answer: I was recently wondering how spot metering worked with ...


1

From the D7000 manual page (link to manual), you can read page 105 : Spot: Camera meters circle 3.5 mm (0.14 in.) in diameter (approximately 2.5% of frame). Circle is centered on current focus point, making it possible to meter off-center subjects (if non-CPU lens is used or if auto-area AF is in effect, camera will meter center focus point). Ensures ...


0

So in short, do I basically need a DSLR for "optimum" image quality? You want to optimize more than just image quality -- you want an optimal balance of image quality and portability/convenience, i.e. something that provides image quality that's significantly better than your phone provides, but as small as possible. Control and ease of use are two ...


1

Why do SLRs and DSLRs use different flash gels? They don't. I have heard that the full CTG works well with film SLR, but something about the color sensitivity of DSLR means that they require ½CTG instead, and likewise for ½CTO. Is that correct? No it's not about the sensor vs film. Different film did however had some slight colour renditions ...



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