Shadowy Daisy

Shadowy Daisy
by damned-truths

Submit your Photo
Hall of Fame

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Hot answers tagged

17

Because in cinema, it's common to change lenses within a shoot while preserving identical exposure. This is rarely important in still photography (and even less so with the flexibility of digital). You might say But t-stops are more accurate, allowing me to be more precise! — and that's basically right, but the main thing is that precision is overrated in ...


14

To add to mattdm's great answer: In addition to the added exposure precision, which is not important to photography, T-Stops are LESS precise in other ways which ARE important to still photography. F-stop is the literal proportion of the aperture to focal length. T-stop adjusts this for exposure, but this raw value is important to depth of field. Depth of ...


13

F-Stops matter most when you care about knowing your composition and depth of field, T-Stops matter most when you care about knowing your exposure. Photographers want to control composition first and adjust exposure as needed. Cinematographers need to control exposure first and then compose as needed. The critical difference with photography is that we can ...


8

Crop sensors are indeed used for wildlife to get more reach without sacrificing megapixels. And, you can get closer images without spending as much money. Sure, you could crop, but then your printing dimensions will be reduced. For display on the web, at 72dpi or so, it wouldn't matter if you cropped. All that said, remember that to get the same image as a ...


7

In general I'd recommend charging the battery fully before 'playing'. However this probably isn't necessary with modern lithium ion batteries, which don't suffer from memory effects. The idea of battery memory and long first charges is a hangover from the day's of NiCd batteries. When in doubt though read the manual.


7

Not necessarily. The APS-C sensor merely crops the image that would have been captured on a full frame sensor, so you end up with what you'd get if you used a full frame and cropped in post (see: Does my crop sensor camera actually turn my lenses into a longer focal length? and Is crop-factor a bad thing?) But given a full-frame and a crop sensor of the ...


6

DoF scales on lenses is pretty much of thing of the past (see: Why did manufactures stop including DOF scales on lenses?), mostly due to the fact that zoom lenses and autofocus are ubiquitous and commonly used. A DoF scale changes with focal length, and autofocus has made the focus "throw" of a lens much much smaller than in manual focus days, so using a ...


5

I would like to purchase my first DSLR camera with similar features and experience to my AE1 Canon film camera. It's going to be a very apples and oranges kind of comparison. When Canon introduced the AE-1 Program in 1976, it was very advanced and made it a lot easier to take correctly exposed photos. But today's cameras have more and different features. ...


5

There can definitely be some benefit to be gained by using a crop sensor camera when longer focal length is desireable. It is one of the reasons compact "superzoom" cameras can give fields of view equivalent to 1000mm+ focal lengths on a full frame camera with a much smaller lens than would be required to get that same FoV using a full frame sensor camera. ...


4

It really all depends upon exactly which part of the AE-1 experience you most wish to replicate. How the controls with which you set the camera look and feel? What you see when you look through the viewfinder? Size and weight? Image quality? A sensor size that preserves what you have learned regarding focal length, field of view, aperture and depth of field? ...


4

The battery charger that comes with your camera indicates when the battery is fully charged. After this point is reached, it will stop charging the battery, so leaving the battery in the charger any longer than this will have no effect. My recommendation is to simply charge the battery until the charger indicates that it is fully charged before using it for ...


3

There's no universal answer. Cameras are different, with differing resolutions, pixel pitch, and noise performance. A newer camera can trump a bigger camera. Does the bigger one have bigger pixels, more pixels the same pitch, or something in between, which makes them harder to compare? Also, you might be able to afford a much better lens (or only use the ...


3

Ignore our answers. We don't have a clue. Get whatever you want. It's your life. Nobody here knows what the future will bring or what will make you happy. As far as professional photographers goes, a pro earns money and that's the only difference between an amateur and a professional. It says NOTHING about talent, equipment, or ability. Practically every ...


2

Can you put a small piece of gaffer's tape over it? Should be easy to cleanly remove when you want to. For some controls I've used a dab of hot glue, sometimes with a piece of teflon tape covering the knob surface itself. If you build up some glue against the teflon tape, then remove the tape, you can sometimes create a "semi-protected" state where it can ...


2

You could remove it altogether. Set the diopter wheel at the adjustment you desire. While holding the adjustment wheel to prevent moving it use a (correct size & type) screwdriver to remove the screw in the center of the wheel. Lift the wheel straight out of the housing. Replace the screw to close up the opening. If you don't want to do anything ...


1

Is there a way to permanently disable/fixate the diopter knob on pre-set value? I doubt it. The knob seems to be mechanical, and there's nothing like a "locked" setting. I don't think you'd want to remove it entirely because you'd have no way to fix it if it ever went out of adjustment, or if your eyes change. Perhaps the best solution is to arrange your ...


1

Chris Walton already answered how to use a single circular polarizer for your two lenses of different sizes. But I want to address the implicit question "why are there such different prices in circular polarizers?" One of the reasons for the large difference in price between polarizer filters is quality. More expensive filters probably have better coatings ...


1

These two lenses have different filter sizes. This means you will either need two filters (55mm and 62mm) or a 62mm filter with a 55-62 step up adaptor. (If you use a step up ring, the smaller filter size lens will not be able to use its lens hood when the filter is in place.) The filter is useful in landscape work in some circumstances: removing reflections,...


1

I'd stop worrying too much about the technical details, go to a shop or find friends with modern cameras and just try them out. There are excellent cameras at a variety of price and feature points, which can all take good pictures. Don't go for a simple 'point and shoot' only type of camera if you want to explore more. And don't go for one that has every ...


1

Similar experience will be a problem. AE1 is a fairly small camera for todays DSLR standards. If you want something that has similar size, you will have to get a camera with smaller sensor and this is again changing the experience, because the lenses do not behave the same way as on 24x36mm frame. With regards to the DOF scale, this is a feature of the ...


1

I'm looking for my first DSLR and I want it to be sharp (I mean, 5DsR is really sharp but it has low dynamic range), has high dynamic range (like the D810) and has low iso noise. This contradicts following: Canon is the one and only brand I can consider, mostly because they lenses feels much more solid in the hand and they have nice wide-angle lenses. ...


1

I wouldn't exclude Nikon. I have a D750 and a 20mm 1.8 prime lens and I absolutely love it. You could also consider something like the A7 Mark II. It's what a lot of people are going for nowadays.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible