Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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16

Pentax D645 K-x K-r K-5 K-5 II K-7 K-30 K-50 K-500 K-3 Q Q10 K-01 MX-1 K10D (u) K20D (u) K200D (u) K2000 (u) Models marked with (u) do not support creating compressed DNGs. These older cameras create DNGs that are larger than the equivalent Pentax-proprietary PEF raw files.


15

There is something particularly conceptually wrong with throwing away the stuff that comes out of your camera. If your camera shoots in DNG, then that's what you work with. If it shoots in RAW, the same. If it shoots in either, you have to figure out what the difference is in terms of metadata that is supported, as well as all of your workflow. When your ...


12

Your answer can be found at this forum site, but the short is, you will lose some EXIF information, the lens id in particular, but the normal EXIF will be there (IE, aperture, focal length, exposure time, flash firing).


11

Whatever you do, do not throw away your original RAW files. DNG is not a replacement for them. Perhaps your workflow requires you to convert into DNG's, but for the love of god do not throw away the originals. If you do, then one day you will find that you will want to use a piece of software that doesn't support the DNG format as input.


10

Ricoh supports DNG in the Ricoh Digital GR, considered a professional compact, the Ricoh Caplio GX100 the Ricoh GR Digital series


9

DNG can be a rather complex beast. The file format is similar to TIFF, in that it is not specifically an image format itself, but more of a container. A "normal" DNG image will store metadata, the primary image in TIFF format, and possibly a thumbnail image. Depending on how DNG is used by any given program, the reality may differ. It is possible to store ...


9

All image previews are stored as JPEG files of various sizes inside of a .lrprev file. The loading speed of the preview images will likely not change much if you switch to DNG. The benefit of DNG is that it is an open standard format, and can keep the metadata in the same file as the image data, which simplifies portability. On the flip side, you would incur ...


8

You missed some Casio models: FH100 & FH25 For a list of current DNG supporting cameras, it is any easy search on Neocamera, just select the DNG check box. Here are the results.


7

All digital Leicas support DNG, including M8, M8.2, M9, S2 and X1.


7

agreed on not throwing away the original raw; Many import systems allow you to embed the RAW inside the DNG, so it's there if you need it; I personally do that on all of my images. I use DNG primarily because that format includes the metadata sidecar as part of the DNG, where for RAW files, the metadata sidecar is generally a separate file. Bundling this ...


7

Fast Picture Viewer is $9.99 and works just fine on 64-bit Windows 7 (I'm using it myself). You can also install the 32-bit codec and then view the folder with Windows Live Photo Gallery, which will generate the thumbnails for you. Other applications, like Explorer, will then be able to use these thumbnails - but you'll have to reopen WLPG every time you ...


7

Disclaimer: this is what I recall from having read about the prospect of going all-DNG for file archives. I might be a bit fuzzy or off. DNG is a standard format, with specific properties. The raw files produced by a camera have a unique format, which does not precisely map to the DNG spec - camera manufacturers are being a bit cagey about file formats. ...


6

DNG files are based on the TIFF/EP standard, ISO 12234-2, (they're essentially bitmaps with extra metadata) so if you start out with an appropriate TIFF I/O library that will get you part way, but you'll need to fill in the extra data required by DNG, which could be tricky. Raw converters need to know more than just the pixel intensities. Other relevant ...


5

I guess technically speaking, DNG (although it is called a raw file or raw file archive) is not really raw in the truest sense. A "RAW" file is one that is essentially a direct dump of data from a camera's image sensor and image processors (i.e. Digic 4 in Canon), without any format conversion or processing applied. Such raw files are tuned to the hardware ...


5

Adobe maintains a list of native DNG compatible cameras here (for the purposes of seeing whats compatible with Adobe Camera Raw): http://www.adobe.com/products/photoshop/extend.html#dngcompatible The list consists mainly of Casio, Leica, Pentax, Ricoh and several Samsung cameras. It might be worth checking the page however as more cameras are added, and ...


5

The preview image tends to be used as a thumbnail in the computer, it can be used to quickly glance at a bunch of files and figure out which is the one you want. It's up to you, but I recommend keeping the preview image. It doesn't need to be full sized, but the small image should be worth it.


5

RAW is RAW. If you convert it to anything else, it is no longer RAW. Sure, you have more bit-depth than converting to an 8-bit format and you don't have an image yet (not all color channels are present at all pixels) but if you really want to keep your originals, you should keep your originals. Sorry if this goes against common lore but it can't be any other ...


5

Fast Picture Viewer has an extensive pack for the low price of $9.99 and it appears to cover them all. They used to give the DNG one away for free (I'm using it), but I'm not sure if that is still the case.


5

The DNG documentation is freely available from Adobe and they include an SDK, though I haven't checked the SDK for language options, very likely something like C or C++, but you never know these days... :) In any case, the specification is open and freely usable.


4

All you need do is install the relevent codecs, which are available from Canon for CR2/CRW (32-bit only), Nikon for NEF (32-bit only), Olympus (32-bit only), Panasonic (32-bit only), Pentax (32-bit only) & Sony (32-bit and 64-bit) The hack to run the 32-bit version of Windows Explorer (even on a 64-bit OS) no longer works on Windows 7, in my experience. ...


4

Benefits or disadvantages aside, you can't import JPEG as DNG in Lightroom (to my knowledge). If you import a JPEG file in "Copy as DNG" mode, LR will prompt an error dialog saying, in substance: "Non-raw files were not converted to DNG". What you can do, however, is select your JPEG file in LR, and export it as DNG, then re-import that DNG file. DNG is ...


3

The only real gain is the ability to apply non-destructive edits to the image and to reset them inside the file, as you noted in your message. Bear in mind that it can't totally put you in the same position as the RAW source format since the actual sensor data is lost along with anything discarded during the JPEG compression phase. Beyond that, there really ...


3

The biggest advantage to me, is that it's an extra step in my workflow to convert my 5D2 raw files to DNG. That extra step translates into more time in the post processing step. I'm going through 20GB of photos I just took while in spain, and converting them to DNG before I got started with it, would be a pain. I could save the resultant images as DNG, or ...


3

Think this way: maybe in the near future Capture NX may have a nice interface. You start using it but all your original NEF files are gone. To my acknowledge Capture NX is one of the best sharpener for NEF files. Don't throw away your NEF files. I was in the same situation as you. I converted all my NEFs to DNG. You know, DNG is "universal", smaller files ...


3

Adding to jrista's answer, you can always embed your original RAW file to the DNG file (in the Preferences dialog, under the tab File Handling). This way you can keep your original RAW files. Or you keep them separated, it is up to you.


3

According to Attila Acs: You can compress new DNGs: if I import them using the Lightroom “convert to DNG” command, they are compressed You can also compress DNGs already in your Lightroom database: Select the photos in your catalog and choose “Metadata -> Update DNG Previews & Metadata”


3

Apparently there is a more recent build of CHDK for this type of camera that can be found on the forums: http://chdk.setepontos.com/index.php?topic=7864.0 Downloaded & installed it and works fine now. The newly generated DNGs are free of dead/stuck pixels now...


3

There may be a work around using Adobe DNG Converter. I don't have a Mac to try it on, but it can convert many DNGs to a more generic type.


3

On the import tab choose "Copy" instead of "Copy as DNG", then you will retain the large data amount. One of the benefits of using DNG is that it uses less space. But normally it is only a 20% improvement. It would be helpful to know your camera model, so we can see waht raw format it is (compression or not, number of previews, etc.. The raws contains ...


3

I think you should be able to do it using "exiftool" --- I tested on a Linux PC, via commandline, and with a Sony ARW image, so your mileage may vary --- I have no DNG to test with. The command is basically: exiftool '-previewImage<=myown.jpg' test.arw (the quotes are needed in Unix to prevent the shell interpretation of <=). I have a bit of ...



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