Spring 2012

Spring 2012
by ani

Submit your Photo
Hall of Fame

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

New answers tagged

0

Conform to practice. Do what reality suggests. If you know the conditions under which your work will be shown and you can't control the conditions, adapt your work to show to its best advantage. For example: I won't (knowingly) suggest a low-key image with shadow detail in a dimly lit environment.


0

It's a perception thing. Under certain dim lighting conditions, the "Purkinje shift" allows some colours that look the same under normal conditions to appear lighter or darker. It's due to the different luminosity response (apparent brightness) of the rods and cones in the retina. It's the actual colours in your print. Everything will look normal as the ...


0

Provide sufficient light where you hang your print. A dedicated soft spot light source for example will work wonders. Photoshop can do a lot, but it cannot make your print glow in the dark. If you think about it, that's what you are doing on your monitor as well. If you had an uncalibrated monitor that displayed your image too dark, would adjust the image ...


0

I haven't had a problem of images feeling dramatically different. But there is a different feel, and some do seem to led to backlight better and some feel better in print. I don't think it's just a matter of some adjustments as much as it is the nature of the media. I think print lends itself better to higher contrast content. You can adjust the brightness ...



Top 50 recent answers are included