Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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1

Your iMac display is a high quality, IPS display, and can be calibrated quite easily. Any of the top colorimeters will do: Sypder, XRite, etc. The only downside of the iMac is that it does not allow the display to be dimmed to the same degree as some external monitors. Brightness is a critical part of calibration, so this is a well known limitation. So if ...


0

If ambient light reading suggests you 180-200 cd/m2 then your ambient light is definitely too high. Try to lower your ambient light to a point where it suggests 80-120 cd/m2. Furthermore, your monitor seems to have a big color gamut, so it's normal that it seems to have more saturation than your MacBook Air. Be sure you calibrate both screens and that, ...


1

Taking an image "Outside" does not guarantee you D65 color temperature, unless measured. Also without having drivers adjusted to provide a D65 simulation on your monitor, the results can not be accurate enough to be called calibration. Even with the cheap calibration devices available it is difficult to sometimes get an accurate match between monitor and ...


2

In theory, this seems fine, but a cheap color calibration device gives you steps 1 and 2 already done, plus 3 done with many, many more samples than a color chart, and 4 done automatically. I'm willing to bet that inaccuracies in the first steps plus the limited number of samples add up to less-than-ideal results. With a "real" colorimeter costing under ...


0

After connecting the computer to my tv and back to this monitor the issue was gone. Nothing of what I've tried work and seriously had no clue as to what happened. Sorry I could not provide any good solution if anyone out there eventually will face this problem.


1

Saturation and Luminosity are tied together when using RGB. If you want your prints to look good then I think you want a similar amount of light coming out of your monitor as light bouncing off a piece of paper. I use 100 for my brightness and I don't think that is too far off the mark. Also you mentioned a warm cast... definitely check out black and white ...


1

Native mode is correct, don't dumb down the color space to sRGB if the monitor can produce a greater gamut. Calibrate your printer or get prints made that you can check you monitors calibration with. Don't go by opinion. Here's a link to a free tool I created that you can use to check color from print to display. There's a link at the bottom of the page ...


2

Probably you did not use color calibration on your old laptop monitor, so when you adjusted the images in Lightroom, they looked right, but in an unmanaged environment. Consequently, bringing those images to the color-managed Viewsonic will create no good at all. And finally, probably you do not have a correct color management flow from your monitor to the ...


1

In theory, DisplayPort enables you to get the most out of your monitor. How much you will notice the improvement depends on a lot of factors; proper calibration, ambient lighting, your own colo(u)r perception and so on. Thath being said, the image certainly won't get worse. Maybe your pics will look worse, because minor details suddenly become more ...



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