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31

There are probably a few things you should look for. Color range is probably the most important factor, and a monitor that is at least capable of representing the Adobe RGB Wide Gamut color space (or color gamut) is important. Most professional cameras will generate images in the Adobe RGB space, while many printers, such as Epson's Stylus Pro line, support ...


21

The 27" LED mac displays are "full gamut" displays, ones that cover around 98% of the Adobe RGB gamut. These are full 8 bit/channel (24bit) screens and offer a full 178° viewing angle. They are much higher quality displays than your average LCD screen, and specifically designed to output high quality, rich, saturated graphics. Additionally, Safari, which I ...


17

ColorHug is the Best Answer Linux developer Richard Hughes has designed and sells an open source colorimeter called the ColorHug. If you are running Linux, and don't have other hardware available already, this is simple, cheap, and fast. (In fact, it's about 50× faster than the old GretagMacbeth I was using before.) The current price is £60 plus shipping ...


17

This can be a complex answer, and quite often, the outcome is that it depends what you print on, meaning you might need to change it or recalibrate often. On White Point White point from the perspective of the human eye is a very subjective thing, as the eye automatically "recalibrates" itself to differing white points depending on the kind of light that ...


14

This has bothered me for years, especially on laptop screens that have no hardware calibration option. Here's an instant fix: Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Control Panel\Mouse] "MouseTrails"="-1" Save that as a .reg, merge it and then Log Off/On. With mouse trails enabled windows uses a different render for the cursor which in ...


11

There are a three types of flat-panel monitors (IPS, VA, and TN) and IPS will give you the best results for photography. It's often difficult to figure out the exact type of panel a given monitor uses; here's a list. Install it somewhere you can provide consistent lighting, and calibrate it with a hardware colorimeter.


11

The short answer is that yes, essentially all monitors need calibrating if you're going to do photoediting. Apple makes some decent monitors, but they're not particularly different from others, nor (specifically) any less in need of calibration than others. Keep in mind, however, that calibration isn't magic -- it won't suddenly make a really cheap monitor ...


11

I have one. You're right — it's a good value for the money, and there's basically no catch except that if you're running under Mac or Windows you'll need to know a little more about what you're doing than you might if you just bought one of the big-name devices. That's because there's only software for Linux. If you are using Linux (any modern ...


9

Essentially your web page is correct. Display Calibration depends on your operating system. By far the easiest, least error prone way is to use a colorimeter, like the Eye-One or Spider systems. These plug into your computer, then you place the sensor on your montior, run it's software, wait a minute or too, and it'll generate a proper color profile for ...


9

It looks like the ZR30W uses a fluorescent backlight. Although it's a cold-cathode fluorescent, the color still changes a little with the temperature. You want to be sure you let the display warm up for quite a while before profiling it to be sure the temperature is stable. The usual recommendation is something like 20 minutes as a minimum, but from what ...


8

The 27" iMac has a pretty mid-high end LED backlit S-IPS LCD panel. Your low end Dell laptop and LCD monitors probably use TN panels which are inferior in color reproduction, angel of viewing, saturation, etc. Most TN panels are only 18 bit displays, so they will interpolate the 24 bit color your graphics card is putting out, while IPS panels will give you ...


8

No, you do not... Unless you did something wrong of course ;) The importance is to calibrate your monitor to sRGB color space. Once it is setup that way, then giving it a known input will result in a known color. My setup is OpenSUSE with Parallels Desktop and only the monitor needed to be calibrated. Some people calibrate their graphics cards instead of ...


8

The obvious problem (or an obvious problem, anyway) is that relatively few cameras have (even very close to) the degree of accuracy and repeatability of exposures to make it work at all well. Back when magazine review budgets allowed it, some of them included graphs of camera shutter speed accuracy. Especially in faster shutter speeds, it was pretty routine ...


8

Some monitors need more calibration than others and their color-gamut limits how close they can actually get to showing accurate colors. For example, if a monitor can only has 80% coverage of sRGB, then even after the best calibration it will at most show 80% of colors right. Good monitors now cover 100% (at least 98%) of sRGB and a good percentage (92%+) ...


7

It's impossible to validate your color calibration without a 'real world' calibration source... Literally something that you're able to hold up to your monitor and saying 'yep, those colors on the screen are matching what I'm holding in my hand.' If you don't have a (reliable) printer in order to check your calibration, you can buy a calibrated color checker ...


7

The ambient light temperature will effect how you perceive colours on your monitor --- since unlike a reflective medium the colour of light falling on it has no effect on the colour reflected. The colours of everything else you see around your monitor, and when you look away will differ though, and your eyes will adjust to the ambient colour. Hence the need ...


7

You've accidentally turned on Onscreen Proofing, which is used to simulate the colors of a final output medium like CMYK ink on paper. Turn it off by going to the View menu and clicking Onscreen Proofing, or hitting Option-Shift-P


7

Color management is an annoyance that I've recently been learning about; it is not completely accurate to say that just because your monitor can only display sRGB that it's meaningless for your photos to be edited in the AdobeRGB or ProPhotoRGB space. What is actually happening is that Lightroom is translating colors from ProPhotoRGB into the sRGB space ...


6

Yes, I have a Spyder 2, and I experience the same on all screens that I have calibrated, although not as strongly as you as I calibrate to 6500K. As the mouse cursor is drawn using a hardware sprite rather than drawn as regular graphics, if the graphics hardware supports it, it's not affected by the color profile. You might consider changing the color ...


6

In addition to what others said about the display quality, I would like to mention that there is no need to switch to iMac to see nice colors. Dell itself manufactures several display models widely considered as good for color-sensitive work. They also have IPS panels and wide gamut at a lower price than the Apple product. See for example DELL UltraSharp ...


6

These hardware calibration devices work by running a piece of software on the computer that displays a series of colors and grey levels. By placing the spyder reading device on the computer monitor, it is able to "see" what the computer is displaying. By taking a series of measurements, a profile of the total system including video drivers and monitor ...


6

Yes, there is a point. It will let you see your own photos more accurately. Since you do not print them, I assume you look at them on your own monitor. Even if it is only for others, non-calibrated monitors differ widely but they are improving at least in the mid-range with the advent of LEDs (and eventually OLEDs), so over time people will see your images ...


6

Normally you would use sRGB mode. It is the most common denominator. Keep in mind that this mode is not calibrated, so your sRGB colors will be different from other sRGB colors. They should be closer. Once in sRGB mode your monitor may not be able to show colors which are outside of sRGB color-space which is why sRGB is not the default mode. The truly odd ...


6

Yes - you need to calibrate your monitor. One option, which is what I did, is to buy a relatively cheap colorimeter, at the time the Huey Pro was generally available. I used it as a travel colorimeter. Later, when I wasn't traveling as much, I bought a more expensive colorimeter (Lacie Blue-Eye Pro) for my home IPS monitor. I found that the cheaper ...


5

I've been using ArgyllCMS plus a Pantone Huey on Linux and it works. Argyll is no walk in the park usability wise (run a bunch of obscure command line programs in the proper order) but it does work and it claims to be more accurate than friendlier solutions.


5

Jerry Coffin's answer was excellent, and I can't add a whole lot more. One other possibility may be the calibration hardware itself. There are two fundamental types of calibration devices: Colorimiters and Spectrophotometers. A Colorimiter is a "scientifically subjective" device. It uses an approach to calibration called "tristimulus", and is designed to ...


5

For me, the best way to determine if I had properly calibrated my monitor was to print something. If you have a printer that's been properly calibrated, or isn't too far off from what the manufacturer expects, then you should be able to 'just print', and the print should look like the monitor screen (at least, in the same light that you calibrated the ...


5

You don't say what operating system you're using but assuming it's Windows I would recommend using RealWorld Cursor Editor to create yourself a custom cursor. http://www.rw-designer.com/cursor-maker It's freeware and will allow you to design a dimmer cursor with a custom colour that will appear white on your monitor. If you're familiar with Photoshop or ...


5

To calibrate your monitor you need a calibration device like a DataColor Spyder or X-Rite DTP94, or a monitor with inbuild calibration device like the Eizo CG245w. These will calibrate the colors of your monitor, but usually not the brightness. To really calibrate brightness you need to take the lighting of your working place into account, you need ...



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