Orquid "Phoenix"

Orquid "Phoenix"

by ceinmart

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23

Having finished scanning 40 year old film I can assure you that you need to think longer term than 10 years, in fact at least 40 years. To know whether there is an answer one must understand the problem. These things can happen: proprietary software makers stop supporting old formats, very possible after 40 years. proprietary operating systems stop ...


12

A modern scanner of typical resolution should be able to do a reasonably good job on old photos if well used. Method of use can make a difference. See references at end for some tips and guidance. A 6" x 4" print at 300 dpi corresponds to 1800 x 1200 pixels ~=.... 2.5 megapixels A 6" x 4" print at 600 dpi corresponds to 3600 x 2400 pixels ~=..... 9 ...


8

There are a number of important details missing from your question: What resolution do you require? Color or black and white? Does the scanner have to be able to handle a mix of sizes simultaneously, or can you sort them ahead of time so that all the photos in a given stack are the same? (Sheet feeders typically work best when the sheets are about the same ...


8

Adobe's Digital Negative format is an attempt to create a free open "universal" format explicitly to solve the issue of long term digital archiving. It is used natively by some cameras but not yet by the big two (Nikon/Canon). It is however easy to convert from Nikon/Canon Raw to DNG. It make take a little more time to see if DNG will gain traction in the ...


5

The file format is basically irrelevant What's much more important is the physical medium. Look at seven inch floppies, three inch, qic, sun scsi, pata, ... All these and more have gone and it will be more and more difficult to get drives, and even if you have drives, the interconnects for them. You will need to periodically update the physical media, then ...


5

While file formats may become obsolete it is not going to happen in one moment. After new format is introduced software will continue to support old one for some years - so you will have plenty of time to convert all your photos. Also in worst case you can always install old software (and if software no longer works on your system you can use virtual ...


5

First, I strongly recommend Ctein's book on photo restoration. It's got all of the gory detail work and techniques in it that are needed for this: Photo repair .com site Not sure what scanner you are using, but modern scanners, even really inexpensive ones, are pretty good. I've done a fair amount of recovery work of family photos using under $100 Canon ...


4

Let me answer your direct question first: The document imaging folks have been doing this for ages. They typically are used for huge image scanning projects, like the US Census form processing. I've never seen one for photos, but that is really just a difference in pixel density -- everything else would be the same. These are insanely expensive to buy, and ...


2

To be honest, I think this is a non-issue and the RAW formats will be supported a long time in to the future. Canon/Nikon RAW formats may be proprietary but there are many programs that can read and convert them into other formats, and I think there always will due to the shear number of files as @Ken stated. I think I would be more concerned whether the ...


2

This is a good question, unfortunately I do not know a good answer. My guess is that you are safe as long as Nikon exists and as long as they do not force you to buy a new camera or software ;-) However, since NEF, Nikons RAW file format, is proprietary and Nikon's software does not offer DNG export - as far as I know - you will not have a 1:1 copy of the ...


2

To scan transparent material (such as a negative, or your lantern slide) you need to reveal the light source in the lid of the scanner, by removing the cover that provides the white background for reflective scanning. I think that is what the error message is telling you. Check the instructions in the manual. You can simply rest the lantern slide on the ...


2

I wouldn't worry about it for several reasons. The history of computing shows an extremely strong tendency for backwards compatibility and the status quo. x86, a 33 year old computing architecture, has actually gained market share over time in personal computing despite many superior competitors. As long as this is the case, old software and operating ...


2

I would stay away from using the word "always" as exceptions certainly exist. I would assume that the quality of scanners in most shops is much higher quality then your basic negative scanner, but why don't you just ask them what quality the scans are? Most shops that are legitimate have different levels of scans depending all on what you want(and price of ...


1

The color channels are not properly aligned, so you need to break the image into color channel layers, information on how to do that can be found here. Then you can independently align the channels and remix.


1

Wait, are you saying your images are already digital but only in the wrong resolution? In that case you should really skip the printing-to-rescan part and directly use e.g. ImageMagick's convert which can easily batch-convert all images to your desired resolution. Assuming you're using Linux and all images reside in a directory original (including ...


1

I worked in a professional lab for 15 years. With a modern high quality scanner (like the Epson Perfection V600 Photo Scanner) there will be very little difference between what you get at home and what you get from the lab. The real area where the difference exists is the final product. At Miller's (the lab I worked at), we had every scan cleaned up by a ...


1

As long as open source software exists which can read it now, you'll be fine. If your files can be read by open source RAW software such as dcraw (or software that depends on it, like ufraw of RawTherapee), then you can breathe easily. As open source, it can never be withdrawn by its vendor, and its source code is always available to others to build into ...


1

One photo file format with good longevity prospects is PNG. PNG files can store images with 16-bit-per-channel color depth and lossless compression. Unlike the raw formats, PNG is an open standard, implemented by freely available software libraries and supported even by very basic editors like Windows Paint. Unlike TIFF, PNG is a relatively simple format ...


1

The only constant in life is change, so planning for that change is very important. I have some negatives I inherited from my grandparents that are over 60 years old (circa 1948-1949). These negatives are on a non-standard film (by today's standards), larger than 35mm but not quite medium format--127 format. My scanner can still read the format, although ...


1

TIFF is far more timeless. In 10 (or 40 or 100) years it's just as likely software would be able to read your Nikon RAW file as a DNG file, so to expend the effort in conversion makes little sense to me as any conversion to a more homogenized format risks losing some data from the original file. Conversion into 16-bit TIFF files is your best option, to ...



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