It's a bird

by Vian Esterhuizen

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There is no one tripod that does everything. (just like there's no such camera, lens, ...) it was recommended that I get a tripod that is set to my height The only reason for that is convenience. Tthe intuition behind this is clear: take images from eye level. But compositionally, that's what every point&shoot user does. It is more interesting (in ...


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I have these legs (Manfrotto 055CXPRO3) combined with this head (Manfrotto 468MGRC4). The maximum height, fully extended, is 1.86m to the quick release plate. That puts the eyepiece of my Canon at 1.99m (comically out of reach for me, at 1.77m tall). The legs can lock at 4 different angles and the centre column can also be rotated through 90 degrees or ...


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My advice is to get the size of tripod you need, and then add a 2 head "Manfrotto Lateral Side Arm", to use that with whatever head you like. http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/554331-REG/Manfrotto_131DB_131D_Lateral_Side_Arm.html


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There may be some psychological and human perception factors involved, but, fundamentally, objects in photographs are as big as you make them. That may sound a little over-simplified, but, really, it's all there is to it. If you have an image of a mountain, and you hold it in your arm and look at the real mountain in the distance right next to it, the ...


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The only way to simulate with a camera and lens what our brain does when we look at distant objects is to use a much longer focal length. This, of course, also reduces the field of view in a dramatic way. If you want a foreground object to remain the same size in your photo while increasing the size of objects in the background you can back away from the ...


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I guess it depends how accurately you want to measure, but this is how I would do it: Wikipedia has a formula for calculating the horizontal/vertical angles of view of a lens from the lens' focal length and sensor dimensions: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angle_of_view#Calculating_a_camera.27s_angle_of_view In the case of the Sigma DP1, the focal length ...


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Unfortunately there is not much point to applying a fisheye effect digitally unless you happen to like the specific effect that a digital fisheye filter has. For example, it can sort of simulate the effect of looking through a glass ball. Actual fisheye lenses exist because they can get a very wide angle of view, and don't need to worry about keeping ...


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This can be derived from the basic lens formulas. The lens divides the entire system in two halves: the subject side, with two variables S the real size of the subject, this is what you are looking for s the distance between the subject and the lens, this is the altitude the image side, also with two variables I the size of the subject in the image, ...


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A term for this kind of pictures is "high-key"-photography. These Pics are overexposed, and in post-production contrast is added (via Lightroom, Photoshop, GIMP - whatever you want.) Also, there is a lot of white (background) space (e.g. the sky), which also emphasizes the contrast. If you want to go about making such pictures on your own, I'd suggest ...


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Notice the blown highlights, and in the top example at least, the clipped shadow detail. This indicates the contrast was increased to the point that both the dark and light ends, but particularly the light end, was clipped. It helps to start with subjects that have large light areas that you actually want to have clipped to full white. Examples are the ...


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Yes you can. The technique you use depends on 2 things. If you need a high resolution option or you want a realtime one. For the high resolution option you can take a series of shoots rotating the camera and after that stilching it on a special program. You can use Hugin that its free. You need some technique to do this. Here are some notes I did ...


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It is possible to create spherical 3D views with a lot of cameras in precise arrangement, post processing and a VR headset. See this blog post by the esteemed Vi Hart for the gritty details: http://elevr.com/stereo-polygons/


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It is possible to capture a full 360 x 180 degree panorama (allowing you to see in every possible direction), using either multiple cameras or specialized reflectors. However it will not be "3-D" in the sense that the image will contain no depth information, you couldn't turn it into a 3D model of a room and rotate it etc.



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