Moonlight

by Jakub

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0

There is no detail because the red channel was clipped (too much exposure). White Balance (Daylight and Flash and Cloudy and Shade) shifts the data to the right in the histogram. These shift red right and blue left, which can cause bright red to clip. It's just kinda how things are. You can monitor this result in the camera histogram, specifically looking ...


0

Red has the lowest of the color temperatures. Back in the days of film, it was possible to use a red light in a darkroom, because the color temperature was so low, the paper didn't pick up on it in the time it took to expose and process the photograph (sometimes up to several minutes). So it's very easy to blow out your reds. Too easy, even with 47 years' ...


1

Like null said, you don't want a tripod. In a studio environment it's just in the way too much. What you want is a camera stand. A camera stand has a small base with wheels to move it easily and a vertical pole that a platform and/or arm hangs off of to which you can mount your camera. Takes up little space, is very maneuverable in the tight spaces of a ...


2

I don't think that you want to use a tripod at all. For easier work, you want to place the product on some kind of table. Adjusting a tripod to point the camera on something on the table can be hard. Even if the middle column of the arm can act as a boom and be adjusted at an angle. A tripod provides a sturdy base at the cost of the space for three legs, ...


1

So I've been using Lightroom CC recently as a test - it turns out that this sort of syncing does not work well. Adobe Lightroom stores absolute paths to files and folders. If you open Lightroom in Windows and save that to the cloud, then download your Lightroom library from the cloud to a Mac and open Lightroom on the Mac - everything will break. There's an ...


0

It's possible with multiple cameras taking a shot at the same time. One option is a ball with cameras facing outwards in all directions. https://youtu.be/c8xjXqC9m2A?t=56


0

I've seen a piece of equipment that helps work around the problem of having to open the books flat. It was pretty fancy but you might be able to make something up yourself. It consisted of a pair of glass sheets set at 90 degrees to each other and mounted so that the joining edge was uppermost (like an inverted V). The book is opened and placed face down on ...


0

Other answers are generally good. This is intended to be complementary. I photographed old but not ancient documents (1900 on) in a library. These were for a church 100 year anniversary so quality had to be good but not utterly archival. For practical purposes the results were indistinguishable from originals by mere mortals. I could set up equipment in a ...


0

You might check with any local university archives, historical societies, or libraries with historical documents for advice. You might also check with any local hobbyist photography groups in the area. There might be someone who can walk you through the first few photos then set you loose. You get good at photography by taking lots of photos, it's a simple ...


0

No, it won't. As modern DSLRs doesn't actually do analog binning, reducing resolution won't make up for the signal-to-noise ratio loss from underexposing. Underexposing When you underexpose one stop, the signal-to-noise ratio roughly halves. When the singal halves, the signal induced noise is reduced with the square root of that (ref), but the readout ...


3

My 2 cents. 1) Use the longest focal range you can, the longest lens and/or the furthest distance you can setup. This is to reduce perspective distortion and chromatic aberrations. 2) You can construct a "table" made of MDF or something similar. You can set it at an angle so you can be far away with your camera but at the same time the document stays in ...


8

I've taken pictures of documents recently. While in my case there was no requirement to have high quality pictures, I decided to try to aim for the most detailed and noise free pictures possible. To get the most detail, you should use the largest focal length available and take pictures from as close as possible, but such that you can still focus on the ...



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