Forgotten in its old age

by Aditya

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2

To clarify what the people above said, the pattern you are seeing probably comes from photographing the gaps between pixels. For various reasons (e.g. camera tilt) they won't be perfectly aligned with the pixels on your CCD and in the resulting image. When downscaling, the algorithm has to decide what color will be a resulting pixel based on colors of ...


3

As other answers state, the effect is called Moire. But why does it happen when you downscale or zoom-out? As prevoiusly stated Moire happens when two patterns interact, specially if the two patterns have a "frequency" (read size of the repeating characteristic) close enough to each other. What happens next is a mathematic relationship between the patterns, ...


3

If the problem only happens when scaling, then that means the scaling is bad. A simple/low quality algorithm was used and therefore the scaled image looks differently than the original. With a quality scaling this does not happen. It would help if you would make the original image available. What software did you use to scale the image? For a quick check ...


7

As your existing (+1) answer says, it's a Moiré pattern. But you see it particularly when the image is scaled. You don't say what does the scaling, but I'm guessing you're just zooming the display, or pasting into Word/Powerpoint/etc., in which case you may benefit from scaling the image using a different method in the GIMP (free), Photoshop (expensive) or ...


25

This is moire. It occurs because a screen is actually a grid of squares that are being used to make the image. When it ends up trying to be mapped to another grid of pixels (either by being captured by a sensor or by scaling) points of light or pixel data don't line up exactly. Some pixels get 2 pixels of information, some get the border between pixels. ...


2

The best way to find out if a cell phone is using an anti-aliasing filter is to ask the manufacture. There is no way to control it. The filter is a physical object, not a program. It sits in front of the sensor. That being said, I would guess that there is no AA filter because of the small size of the pixels. But that's just a guess. Someone who knows for ...


0

It might be, that OpenGL deacitvated. This happened to me, whenever I did a selection and I would have to restart Photoshop CS5. I had to install a much older driver version for my AMD Radeon HD 4600, that did not have those issues.


0

Not all brushes have hardness control. I have just checked in PS 5.1, and with normal, round brushes, I see the red size/hardness indicator, but with other types, e.g. those with many small simultaneous strokes, I neither see the size nor hardness indicator as red, just a simple circle to indicate the target area. You should select the brush, then the ...


0

Check out hi-speed synch photography: http://photography.tutsplus.com/articles/using-high-speed-sync-flash-for-great-flower-photos--photo-8773


0

Since you mentioned that shadows are getting lost in the background, you can add bright colored 'glows' instead (if you're working on Photoshop). Or try some reflections like this. Pick brighter pictures if you have the option, and try to have images of the same size/aspect ratio There are many JS image carousel libraries like this which come with built ...


3

To achieve what you describe requires 3 separate exposures - these can all be achieved within the same frame with due care. To get a clear but ghostly image the ghost either needs to remain in one place for part of the exposure or be flash-lit at the point where it needs to be clear. To get a blurred moving ghosts image the ghost needs to move through the ...


1

It depends on whether you want the ghost to appear as if it's moving or is still. If you want it to look like it's moving then use long exposure & let the ghost move and use a flash on the normal person so they would get propper exposure. If you want the ghost to appear as if it's just standing there then you can either have soft edges & ghostly ...


0

This is two exposures combined. Both the "ghost" walking across the street and the "ghost" sitting on the bench are the same person in different costuming. larger size If you want one person to be a "non-ghost", they would need to sit perfectly still in the same pose for both exposures. In this one the "ghost" behind the bar was in only one exposure of ...


1

I'd suggest combining a long exposure with flash/strobe if you have access to it. This will give you a sharp exposure of the non-ghostly subject. You'll still need to get them to sit still but the result will be much sharper than just using ambient light. Alternatively if your camera supports it you might be able to double expose a frame. A long exposure ...


2

Exactly as you say, a long exposure will do the trick... You should use a filter if you are shooting at daytime, otherwise you will perhaps need to compensate the exposure in postprocessing... Your subject (the real one) needs to be very steady so it is sharp while the ghost who is moving will be blurred... Good luck! P.S.: tripod is a must!


0

It seems that no-one have touched on the issue of light-sensitive area. Sensors can either be front- or back-illuminated and this will result in different effects when increasing the number of pixels. Front-illuminated sensor A Front-illuminated sensor will have transistors and electrical paths on the light-sensitive side of the sensor. These components ...


0

I fully agree with Matt's and Steve's answers, but I think one also needs to consider the enormous advantages of having a higher resolution when doing post processing on images. In general, more megapixels will yield much better images if you try to get the most out of post-processing (provided, of course, you are not comparing a bad camera with a large ...


2

I like the term Radial Motion Blur as it describes both the appearance of the effect and how to achieve it in post processing (most Photoshop editors have a "radial blur" function). Zoom Blur does describe how to achieve the effect, though.


7

Zoom Burst, or Zoom Blur are a couple of variations of names of the effect you're talking about. More info on how to achieve it here, here, or here.


3

Lets go to the extreme case so that we can think about what the filter does. Lets take an arbitrary image and then try to reconstruct what the image would have been if there was an R72 filter on the camera. These are IR longpass filters. You really can't take what the sensor recorded and backwards from there to try to reconstruct the actual wavelengths ...



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