Sunset in Kruger

by MrFrench

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0

You might check with any local university archives, historical societies, or libraries with historical documents for advice. You might also check with any local hobbyist photography groups in the area. There might be someone who can walk you through the first few photos then set you loose. You get good at photography by taking lots of photos, it's a simple ...


0

No, it won't. As modern DSLRs doesn't actually do analog binning, reducing resolution won't make up for the signal-to-noise ratio loss from underexposing. Underexposing When you underexpose one stop, the signal-to-noise ratio roughly halves. When the singal halves, the signal induced noise is reduced with the square root of that (ref), but the readout ...


3

My 2 cents. 1) Use the longest focal range you can, the longest lens and/or the furthest distance you can setup. This is to reduce perspective distortion and chromatic aberrations. 2) You can construct a "table" made of MDF or something similar. You can set it at an angle so you can be far away with your camera but at the same time the document stays in ...


7

I've taken pictures of documents recently. While in my case there was no requirement to have high quality pictures, I decided to try to aim for the most detailed and noise free pictures possible. To get the most detail, you should use the largest focal length available and take pictures from as close as possible, but such that you can still focus on the ...


1

I recommend you follow Metadata Working Group guidelines. They build on and in some cases override the older exif and especially IPTC standards. MWG Location Guidelines


2

For embedding standard metadata in images, EXIF is considered the primary standard, which provides well understood fields for time and location information. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exchangeable_image_file_format In addition, EXIF has a tag known as 'maker data' that allows 3rd parties to embed custom tags. This is typically where a Canon or Nikon ...


0

Perceived handsomeness is tightly tied to proportions, so I doubt you could alter one while keeping the other intact. A simple horizontal flip will probably still keep you too recognizable, and exchanging chin with top of head might distort more than you'd like. Replacing one side of face with flipped version of other side seems to match the criteria. For ...


0

I find it helpful (at times) in composition. Color can be distracting both visually and emotionally. Other times, e.g. wildflower photography it helps to be able to see the image in color while arranging the various elements in the scene. I shoot RAW, and I have a camera (Sony a7R) with an electronic viewfinder.


0

That depends on how much freedom you need/want. Somebody using a large format view camera might be asking a DSLR user how it's even remotely possible to take half decent images with such a limited device. Why would you use a telephoto lens giving up the freedom to crop a wide shot in post processing? And why would anybody take images with a wide open ...


0

You can use your usb cable and connect your camera to the PC, and then use Shell script to shoot with. I used this to shoot HDR timelapse ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQFYTRffuPc&spfreload=10 : I was just playing around ). What you need is an unix like OS, then library like Gphoto, cable which came with your camera, tripod, and simple shell script ...


10

Long exposure astrophotography is often done with a monochrome sensor to maximize the number of photons captured from a faint source. Relatively short exposures with separate Red, Green, and Blue filters are sufficient to color the image, but the longer unfiltered channel provides more detail in the structure of what's being imaged. You can replicate the ...


14

Yes. If you have difficulty visualizing an image in B&W, shooting in B&W gives you a good approximation of the final image at the time of shooting so you can adjust; many digital cameras can even process B&W with color filters, so if you have a particular type of processing in mind, such as using a red filter to darken skies (ala Ansel Adams's ...


0

I guess shooting color images is always the right option, 'reversibility' is the key. A color image could be turned B&W, but with a B&W shot, there's no option. We all know that more or less the appeal of a photo lies in the post production, so why not shoot color and then decide. Anyway, there won't be any difference in energy or information ...


2

There is no benefit to shooting in a monochrome mode as the camera will just be taking a colour image and converting it to monochrome using built in settings. The closest you could argue as reasons to enable a monochrome mode are either to place an artificial inflexibility as part of a creative process or to view monochrome images in the camera display ...


0

In principle, yes, because unless the camera processing software is written in a very poor way, it will not first do the demosaicing to render a full color image and then use that image to compute the black and white image. Rather it will do a dedicated demosaicing to compute the black and white image directly from the raw data, the two processes are not ...



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