Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

Actually, Even if there were a camera with the capabilities of your eyes, the photos you could take with it would be really shitty. What makes your eyes awesome is the software, i.e. your brain that does a ridiculous amount of incredibly sophisticated post-processing that uses time sequences of sensory input to simulate a much higher resolution and dynamic ...


1

On modern DSLRs, the dynamic range increased, sometimes significantly. But there is a theoretical limit to "highlight recovery": If the (digital) value read from the sensor is all "1111" (e. g. the highest possible number), there is nothing that can be recovered, because all pixels which have the max. value are effectively "the same". A film on the other ...


2

IMO, The fastest way to earn cash in photography is to shoot portraiture, this will also help you in building your profile, if you have $500 to spend there are lots of strobe kits that will be in this budget and will serve you great. It may be hard to get your first clients to pay you money so what you can do is you offer for free at the beginning till you ...


1

There are lots of sites where aspiring and professional models, photographers and make-up artists can find each other and arrange shoots. You'll almost certainly be able to find someone who is willing to work for free and in the evenings or at weekends because they're in the same boat as you - in full time work and wanting to put a portfolio together. Have ...


1

This question is an enormous can of worms, in a good way. Of course, different people will have different understandings of what makes a "good" photograph. But this judgement will be based on the specific knowledge the person has, cultural expectations, and where the judgement is located historically. A "wedding" photographer and an art historian will have ...


2

I say for purely evaluating quality of a photograph exposure is the only measure. Oh... and resolution. But without considering the subject this can get silly... I can make a perfectly exposed image of a pitch black night sky or I could create a portrait with beautiful bokeh that completely covers my subjects face. So, for viewer enjoyment (if you want ...


2

You can't really rank them in any meaningful way because each photo is different and will have a different ranking. That being said, the ones I can think of off hand are: composition, good exposure, global contrast, local contrast, sharpness, saturation, depth of field, color balance, and noise.


0

One advantage of film is you an get everything you need really cheap. I recently acquired material from an estate for simply taking it away. 100 per lot cases of Ilford B&W 120 film, over 1000 sheets of 4x5, hundreds of feet of 35 with new film cartridges and loaders, hundreds of rolls each of 10 different 35mm B&W films. Cases if NIB 4x5 film ...


0

One of the most important advantages of digital is that it allows you to adjust on the fly. That instant feedback means you don't have to wait for the film to be developed to know what you have...and, more importantly, what you DON'T have. Even mid-range digital cameras have gotten so with low light and high dynamic range that you can shoot photos that you ...


0

I specialise in photographing paintings and most of the above are good suggestions. Definitely start with a white balance for the lighting you are using and for super accurate colours a Q card OR colour checker passport would be essential. BUT all this is out of the window and a complete waste of time unless your monitor is calibrated. The mention of ...


1

Traditionally the technique for photographing prints and paintings is called "cross polarization", where you have polarizing filters on both the lens and the light sources. This helps prevent glare (which washes out detail and color). The setup is a little complicated, but you want two lights set at 45 degree angles from the artwork, and the camera set back ...


2

Filters will definitely help, contrary to the other answers. Let me explain this (and I assume that you shoot in RAW. the only proper way to go.) Let's say you have an average RGB value of (95%, 25%, 10%) through the entire picture. This is basically a heavy red color cast over the image. Now, RED is being digitized using the ~95-100% of the dynamic range ...


2

The problem is most likely white balance. Your camera can't tell the different between a grey painting in red light and a red painting in white light. If it sees a lot of red, it'll probably assume it's in red-ish light and will "correct" away some of the redness. A simple solution is to photograph a piece of white paper or plastic (make sure it really is ...


3

I'd recommend getting a colour swatch such as the X-Rite Color Checker Passport. If you take a photo of your painting with the device in shot, this acts as a reference for all other photos taken with the same lens and lighting conditions, and ensures the colours are as accurate as possible. The device comes with a stand-alone application and a Lightroom ...


9

Probably not. Color filters can be useful when you want to get a certain look in a black and white photograph, but usually don't enhance color. That's because they are inherently restrictive — they subtract colors from the scene. Probably what you need is a) better lighting on the painting and b) to shoot in Raw so you can make careful adjustments to bring ...



Top 50 recent answers are included